York Affinity 3S question?


  #1  
Old 03-25-09, 05:56 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
York Affinity 3S question?

I had my home built around a year and a half ago. We have a York Affinity 3S heater\AC unit. I dont know anything about heaters or AC units but I have been having problems the whole time. They have come out to replace parts, add freon, and even changed the thermostat out. Last time they came out they reset the compressor outside and it started working again. I tried it today and at first it didnt work but then I put the thermostat to emergency heat and its working now so far. He told me to make sure its working correctly I could touch the pipe outside that goes from the compressor to the house and it should be hot after awhile. I went outside and the compressor is not blowing at all(is it suppose to?) and the pipe is cold, but for some reason hot air is blowing in the house. Is this correct? Thanks, I have lost my confidence in the AC\Heater company.
 
  #2  
Old 03-25-09, 07:01 PM
hvachelp's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: illinois
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by thomas975 View Post
I had my home built around a year and a half ago. We have a York Affinity 3S heater\AC unit. I dont know anything about heaters or AC units but I have been having problems the whole time. They have come out to replace parts, add freon, and even changed the thermostat out. Last time they came out they reset the compressor outside and it started working again. I tried it today and at first it didnt work but then I put the thermostat to emergency heat and its working now so far. He told me to make sure its working correctly I could touch the pipe outside that goes from the compressor to the house and it should be hot after awhile. I went outside and the compressor is not blowing at all(is it suppose to?) and the pipe is cold, but for some reason hot air is blowing in the house. Is this correct? Thanks, I have lost my confidence in the AC\Heater company.
compressor does not blow anything, condenser fan does in your outside unit. Yes it should be blowing warm air as it cools your condenser coil. Warm air because its geting rid of heat. Your compressor should be on alone with your condenser fan. You should be able to hear compressor. Really if I were you I would have them comeout again obviously something is not rite here. And if you dont know much about your system there are way too many reasons of why its not working. Just call them up and open up a ***** session. Year and a half, they better fixe it.
 
  #3  
Old 03-25-09, 09:21 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the info. Even during emergency heat the fan should be blowing outside? I wonder how I am getting heat if its not blowing.

Originally Posted by hvachelp View Post
compressor does not blow anything, condenser fan does in your outside unit. Yes it should be blowing warm air as it cools your condenser coil. Warm air because its geting rid of heat. Your compressor should be on alone with your condenser fan. You should be able to hear compressor. Really if I were you I would have them comeout again obviously something is not rite here. And if you dont know much about your system there are way too many reasons of why its not working. Just call them up and open up a ***** session. Year and a half, they better fixe it.
 
  #4  
Old 03-25-09, 09:34 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 94
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
When you switched to emergency heat you cut off the outdoor unit. You are now heating on elect strip heat in your air handler.
The outdoor unit will not run in this state..

And I take it that this is a Heatpump system?
In the Heat mode your outside fan and compressor should be running, the large copper line should be warm to hot and it should be blowing cold air from the fan,

In the cool mode the fan and compressor should be running and the large copper line should be cool to cold to the touch and blowing warm to hot air from the fan.

In the heat mode does the unit run at all.
If not first start with the breakers.

And if you could please provide a model number from the unit.. located on data plate on the outdoor unit.
 
  #5  
Old 03-26-09, 09:42 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ah thank you for the good info. So when its in emergency heat is there any reason why I shouldnt use this all the time? Will it eventually just cool down once the elect strip runs out of heat?

Model is YZB03011A. I hope thats the right one. Thanks

13 seer split system and yes its a heatpump. I have no gas at my house.

Originally Posted by cyberdead View Post
When you switched to emergency heat you cut off the outdoor unit. You are now heating on elect strip heat in your air handler.
The outdoor unit will not run in this state..

And I take it that this is a Heatpump system?
In the Heat mode your outside fan and compressor should be running, the large copper line should be warm to hot and it should be blowing cold air from the fan,

In the cool mode the fan and compressor should be running and the large copper line should be cool to cold to the touch and blowing warm to hot air from the fan.

In the heat mode does the unit run at all.
If not first start with the breakers.

And if you could please provide a model number from the unit.. located on data plate on the outdoor unit.
 
  #6  
Old 03-26-09, 09:59 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"In the heat mode does the unit run at all.
If not first start with the breakers."

In the heat mode the outside unit does not run at all. When you say start with the breakers- do you mean to just turn it off then on again?
 
  #7  
Old 04-02-09, 06:51 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 94
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes the outdoor unit should run in the heat mode... does your ac run?

Yes and reset the breakers, it sounds as if you have a control problem though.
 
  #8  
Old 04-04-09, 12:48 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
yes the AC runs. I was told not to turn it off and on again immediately (wait up to 5 min to do it), cause it may turn off the heat on the outside unit and it has to get reset or something. Correct?

Originally Posted by cyberdead View Post
Yes the outdoor unit should run in the heat mode... does your ac run?

Yes and reset the breakers, it sounds as if you have a control problem though.
 
  #9  
Old 04-18-09, 03:10 PM
I
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As CyberDead said, the emergency heat setting at the thermostat shuts off the outdoor unit.
The emergency heat consists of electric heating coils/strips located in the indoor unit. These do not "run out of heat" - the reason not to use emergency heat all the time is the expense: about 2 to 3 times as expensive as heat pump operation.

The advice to wait 5 minutes before switching off and on is bogus. The outdoor unit has a timer so that it will not cycle on / off / on in less than four minutes to protect the compressor. So if you switch the thermostat from off to on, don't expect the outdoor unit to start up immediately - be patient for five minutes (make it ten minutes to be sure) and if the outdoor unit doesn't start then there is some sort of fault.

To check your system:
-set the thermostat to OFF.
-Go to your electric circuit breaker panel, you should find two circuit breakers, one for the indoor unit, one for the outdoor. Just turn them both off and then back on ... this should not be necessary, but at least you'll know that both the control boards have been reset.

Switch the thermostatat to ON=heat, set the desired temperature to one degree above the indicateed temperature - i.e. if the temperature is shown as 68 set the desired temperature to 69 (or greater)

The indoor fan should run immediately - it may blow unheated air
After at most five minutes the outdoor fan should run - you can see it; and the outdoor compressor should run, you can usually hear it - or feel it if you put your hand on the tubing connecting the outdoor and indoor units (York says the compressor is quiet but my YZB unit is plenty loud).
If not both of these, there's a fault.

If the outdoor unit is running, the larger tubing should be hot to the touch after five minutes (just as Cyberdead said) - if not, there's a fault.

There is a fault signalling signal that the York YZB unit provides that should be wired to your thermostat - if it is, then some faults are signalled at the thermostat by flashing a pattern - e.g. flash,flash,flash, pause - signals the condition described by three flashes - which the repair folk should know to interpret. If you don't see the thermostat fault light flashing, either there is no fault detected or the installer didn't bother to connect the fault signal wiring to the thermostat.

As luck would have it, I have a York YZB heat pump system, similar to yours, only a little larger, and regret to tell you that I've had trouble after trouble with it since it was installed a year ago. I think the design is poor, the manufacture worse, and the field support is very weak - a big disappointment and headache to be sure.
 
  #10  
Old 04-19-09, 09:06 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks Idler for all the information. The AC tech came out and reset the outside unit somehow. I dont know if he just turned off the on the breaker but thats what he said. he told me he could not tell me how to do it cause a authorized tech needs to do it. Is this true? I tend to not believe what he tells me anymore. But since then it has worked so far *knock on wood* I have turned on the AC and then the heater(I still wait a few minutes to do it just in case) and it has been working. So I hope thats all it needed. Thanks again.


Originally Posted by idler View Post
As CyberDead said, the emergency heat setting at the thermostat shuts off the outdoor unit.
The emergency heat consists of electric heating coils/strips located in the indoor unit. These do not "run out of heat" - the reason not to use emergency heat all the time is the expense: about 2 to 3 times as expensive as heat pump operation.

The advice to wait 5 minutes before switching off and on is bogus. The outdoor unit has a timer so that it will not cycle on / off / on in less than four minutes to protect the compressor. So if you switch the thermostat from off to on, don't expect the outdoor unit to start up immediately - be patient for five minutes (make it ten minutes to be sure) and if the outdoor unit doesn't start then there is some sort of fault.

To check your system:
-set the thermostat to OFF.
-Go to your electric circuit breaker panel, you should find two circuit breakers, one for the indoor unit, one for the outdoor. Just turn them both off and then back on ... this should not be necessary, but at least you'll know that both the control boards have been reset.

Switch the thermostatat to ON=heat, set the desired temperature to one degree above the indicateed temperature - i.e. if the temperature is shown as 68 set the desired temperature to 69 (or greater)

The indoor fan should run immediately - it may blow unheated air
After at most five minutes the outdoor fan should run - you can see it; and the outdoor compressor should run, you can usually hear it - or feel it if you put your hand on the tubing connecting the outdoor and indoor units (York says the compressor is quiet but my YZB unit is plenty loud).
If not both of these, there's a fault.

If the outdoor unit is running, the larger tubing should be hot to the touch after five minutes (just as Cyberdead said) - if not, there's a fault.

There is a fault signalling signal that the York YZB unit provides that should be wired to your thermostat - if it is, then some faults are signalled at the thermostat by flashing a pattern - e.g. flash,flash,flash, pause - signals the condition described by three flashes - which the repair folk should know to interpret. If you don't see the thermostat fault light flashing, either there is no fault detected or the installer didn't bother to connect the fault signal wiring to the thermostat.

As luck would have it, I have a York YZB heat pump system, similar to yours, only a little larger, and regret to tell you that I've had trouble after trouble with it since it was installed a year ago. I think the design is poor, the manufacture worse, and the field support is very weak - a big disappointment and headache to be sure.
 
  #11  
Old 04-20-09, 08:36 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If the technician removed the access panel to either the outdoor or indoor unit in order to perform his "reset" then he is probably correct to say that this is something you shouldn't do.
If he did have to remove the access panel(s) to "reset" it's hard to imagine what he could have done other than change some settings on the control board - which were either wrong before, or are wrong now but the unit will run and you'll never know that it's misswired or misconfigured. That sounds cynical I know - but the technician could well be untrained or not have your best interests at heart.

But, if not, then the "reset" was probably just cycling the power from on to off to on ... or maybe a circuit breaker had "popped" so it just needed to be turned on.

This power cycling reset seems to overcome a lot of electronics faults these days - no doubt you've had to reboot your PC to get it working again for example

If you do not already know, you should find out where the circuit breakers are for your equipment.
I would expect to find two breaker/switches at the main electrical panel for your house: one for the indoor (air handler), one for the outdoor (heat pump).

Presumably, the installation electrical work was done by an electrician, so one would expect to see labels identifying the circuits. If they aren't labeled, then take the time to experiment to discover which breaker / switches control which circuits in your house. If you aren't comfortable switching your circuit breakers off and on, then it'd be worth it to hire an electrician to come and label the breakers for you and instruct you in turning them off and on ... something that you really want to know for all of your appliances and electrical circuits anyway.

There should also be a "disconnect" mounted near the outdoor unit; this is just a switch to allow turning off the high voltage power to the outdoor unit - this is required in most places so that a technician can be absolutely sure that the power is off when doing maintenance. Take the time to find this, because depending on how it was installed, it may contain a circuit breaker that you would want to be able to know is ON.

If you have a newer York air handler (the indoor unit) you will see one or two circuit breaker / switches on the front panel (possible covered by a flexible plastic to prevent air intrusion) ... the control circuitry for the both indoor and outdoor is energized through one of these, so a "reset" can also be conveniently done by just turning these breaker(s) off /pause a minute/on.

You are probably wondering how it is that there are 5 circuit breakers that you have to think about - but they each serve a purpose ... and there's more:

The thermostat is also probably a digital / electronic beauty. It too can cause trouble and need to be reset. Since it gets its power from the same place as the indoor unit, if you reset that (as described above), then the thermostat is mostly reset too.
But if you want to absolutely reset many modern thermostats, you have to press the magic reset button on the thermostat itself - in order to clear memory and restore factory settings. You can spot this if you remove the thermostat cover (which you should know how to do, because one day you'll want to replace the batteries).
Some thermostats can be reset just by turning them to the off position for a minute, some by removing the batteries for a minute ...

Are you having fun yet ?

For the long run, the best thing is to find a competent service person that you feel you can trust - easier said than done.
 
  #12  
Old 04-21-09, 07:02 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: round rock
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thanks idler, I will have to give that a shot once(if) the heater goes out again. I dont know if I will know until next year since I live in tx and its already getting warm. This York heater is so much fun
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: