ELECTRIC toe kick heater install

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Old 03-27-11, 07:22 AM
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ELECTRIC toe kick heater install

I need to replace a baseboard 6' long heater with a toe kick heater, as this area will now have cabinets in it.
The question I have is whether or not it will still be possible to install such a long heater, when the cabinets themselves are like 33" wide. (let's say I go with a 5' one now). In order to install a heater that long, this would mean that I would have to cut the right "foot" of one cabinet, and the left foot of the other one, as far to the rear of the cabinets as the toe kick is deep, otherwise it would be in the way.
Is this OK to do, does it destabilize the cabinets?
 

Last edited by NJT; 03-27-11 at 11:04 AM.
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Old 03-27-11, 07:41 AM
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I don't think you will be getting good performance out of a baseboard heater that is tucked in under your cabinets. Check out these units designed for such a space: Beacon Morris Kickspace Heaters , Kickspace Heaters , Beacon Morris Heaters - PexSupply.com
 
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Old 03-27-11, 07:49 AM
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The toe kick

I dont think you have to put in that big of a heater. I replaced 6' of baseboard with Beacon/Morris heater that is approx 12"wide, and it is more than enough heat ror the space. You can look up the co's data & spec. sheets to get the heat equivlent heat values. When you install it in your cabinet make shure you make a access hatch on your cab floor to be able to get at your heater, and also put service "ts" on the inlet and outlet, so yoy can easily bleed your unit. Also use flow "ts" on both the supply and return lines to get a good flow through your unit. There are a few threads discussing kick space heaters, and there is quite a bit to learn there.
Sid
 
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Old 03-27-11, 07:56 AM
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I will be replacing the 240V electric baseboard heater with 240V toe kick heater(s). The kitchen was expanded significantly a few years ago and I guess due to expense, the owner at that time decided to put in a 6' electric baseboard heater instead of plumbng another hot water baseboard heater like the rest of the house has.
I'd be afraid to downsize, as I feel this heater is doing a good job and I cant imagine a 12" one being able to keep up.
Any thoughts on the original question though, about cutting into the cabinet feet. or should I get two heaters that fit nicely under each 33" cabinet? (like two 24" ones).
 
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Old 03-27-11, 08:42 AM
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Do you have hot water heat in the rest of the house?

Kick space heaters have fan blowers in them. You have to look at the BTU output of each particular model to size it properly. The 12" one puts out over 4,000 BTU's. I don't know what 6' of electric baseboard does, but a hot water baseboard would be about 3300 BTU's.
 
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Old 03-27-11, 11:02 AM
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For starters, you are talking about electric heat, and this ain't the forum for that, so I'll probably be moving this thread if I can find an appropriate one.

It's all about BTUs ... if you feel that the existing heat is adequate, then you need to know how many BTU it puts out now, and replace with something with equivalent output. Often it has little to do with physical size.

As for questions about ruining the cabinet by hacking it apart, this is also not the place for that, although at least one of our members can probably give you some advice about that... in a private message... right droo?
 
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Old 03-28-11, 07:08 PM
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You need to look at the wattage of the heaters. The voltage doesn't tell you the amount of heat put out. 3414 Btu/hr = 1000 W
 
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