Electric baseboard heater that works with Nest thermostat?

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Old 12-04-12, 10:23 AM
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Electric baseboard heater that works with Nest thermostat?

I have three 240V baseboard heaters in my home and would like to use three Nest thermostats to control them. The heaters are old and ugly, so I'm ready to replace them.

I understand that the Nest only works with low voltage wiring, but every baseboard heater I find wants a high voltage thermostat.

Does anyone here know of a 240V baseboard heater that can be controlled with a Nest? Or is there an easy way to adapt high-voltage wiring to low voltage, then control with a Nest?

Thanks in advance.

Mike
 
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Old 12-04-12, 10:36 AM
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Hi Mike,

is there an easy way to adapt high-voltage wiring to low voltage, then control with a Nest?
There's always a way, sometimes not so easy. In your case, to run electric baseboard with a low voltage thermostat would require an electrician to install heavy duty 'contactors' that would accept the low voltage from the Nest and control the electric baseboards... but...

Since this forum "Boilers - Home Heating Steam and Hot Water Systems" isn't really the place to talk about electric heating and more specifically a thermostat, I'm moving your post to a more appropriate area.
 
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Old 12-04-12, 11:03 AM
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Thanks for moving the thread.

I've since found that adding a relay such as THIS ONE with a baseboard heater might allow me to control it with a low-voltage thermostat, such as the Nest. Can anyone confirm this?

If so, I'll need to find a heater with room in its enclosure for the relay . . .

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-04-12, 02:11 PM
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They seem to be made to order for what you need...

The spec sheet for that relay says it 'replaces the Honeywell R841'

https://customer.honeywell.com/en-US...ath=1.2.10.1.8

So that's another option as well.

What I'm a little puzzled about is the fact that they are saying it's a SPST (Single Pole Single Throw) relay and I've always thought and wired 240VAC circuits with DOUBLE pole switches and relays.

I would think that one would want to switch BOTH of the HOT wires when turning on or off a 240VAC appliance. Maybe the National Electric Code has some exception for electric heat... I'm not an electrician and haven't looked at NEC in years!
 
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Old 12-04-12, 11:59 PM
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The wall type thermostats switch both hot feeds but it seems that most of those self-contained ones like you mentioned only switch one of the hot legs.
 
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Old 12-05-12, 04:22 PM
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That's what I find kinda strange PJ... I was hoping someone with a current copy of NEC might let us know if there's an exception for electric heat in that regard. Maybe a Q in the electrical forum might clear it up!
 
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Old 12-05-12, 05:04 PM
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Why spend the big money for the nest when you can get a pro 600 or any good stat for a lot less money.
 
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Old 12-05-12, 07:39 PM
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NEC does not require that all leads be broken by a control device. Some 240 volt thermostats DO break all leads and when they do they can also be considered as the disconnecting means for the downstream load when they have a positive OFF position.

OR to put it a bit differently...

A thermostat that breaks only one lead is a control only device; a thermostat that has a positive off position AND breaks all leads is both a control device and a disconnecting device.
 
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Old 12-06-12, 09:17 AM
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Thanks Furd, I understand it now...

And a disconnecting device is not needed for control because there is (or must be) a proper disconnecting device in the form of a 2 pole circuit breaker at the service panel.
 
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Old 12-14-12, 04:25 PM
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There are cheaper and better programmable t-stats out there which are specifically made for 240v baseboards.

The nest is over-priced for what it.
 
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Old 12-14-12, 04:38 PM
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Hey.....to each his own.

It may be overpriced but it certainly is cool looking
 
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Old 12-15-12, 06:05 AM
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Honeywell has a wireless t-stat for 240V baseboards and can also be made wifi by adding an internet gateway. http://www.forwardthinking.honeywell...ct/50-1784.pdf
 
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Old 12-15-12, 09:11 AM
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Looks pretty sharp Kevin. It's amazing the technology. Wireless thermostat too
 
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