Heat pump or no?

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Old 02-27-13, 03:47 AM
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Heat pump or no?

SEEMS LIKE THERE IS STILL MUCH CONFUSION ON WHAT ONE BASES THE DECISION TO USE A HEAT PUMP OR NOT..........: FLORIDA, AIR/HEATING IS A COMBO FOR HOMES AND THOSE SELLING THEM TEND TO OFFER HEAT PUMPS MORE THAN NOT BUT.......WITH HEAT PUMP YOU GET A SEER OF MAYBE 14, WITH OUT YOU GET A SEER OF 13, NOT A HUGE DEAL BUT THEN WHAT SUPPORTS THE COST WHEN THEY USE A HEAT PUMP?
lOVE SOME FEEDBACK
 
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Old 02-27-13, 07:16 AM
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Whoa, gotta settle down on the caps.
 
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Old 02-27-13, 07:23 AM
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Sorry about the caps, I usually type with caps because they are easier to type with, easler for people to read and never figured out why there is such a big issue with them....but do not mean to hurt anyone's feelings.
 
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Old 02-27-13, 07:50 AM
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In my opinion....they use heatpumps in the southern states because they need air conditioning more than heat. When they do need heat....a lot is not required.

Up north here we require a lot more heat. A heat pump will work but can not supply all of the heating needs.... especially when the temps are low outside.

It seems to me that a heat pump with a natural gas furnace is a good way to go.

I'm not sure what the ultimate answer is to your question and I'm sure you'll hear a lot of opinions.
 
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Old 02-27-13, 12:46 PM
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PJMAX: thanks for the input; down south, at least in Florida is is electric heat. Air units have a heating coil as part of the system, it is my understanding that using a heat pump costs less to heat a home than the coil design but......not sure what the difference would be; is it that much that it pays for itself over a few years? Your right, probably will get some feedback and always appreciate everyones input
 
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Old 02-27-13, 03:09 PM
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research Heat pump COP.

A heat pump will generally produce 2-4 units of heat per 1 unit of electricity. Electric strip heat is 1 unit of heat per 1 unit of electricity.


An air conditioner works by removing heat from the conditioned space and rejecting it outside . A HP does the EXACT same thing, but it can also reverse the refrigerant flow and work in reverse: Remove heat from the outdoor air and reject it inside.
 
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Old 02-27-13, 03:26 PM
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WITH HEAT PUMP YOU GET A SEER OF MAYBE 14, WITH OUT YOU GET A SEER OF 13
That's a misconception - standard a/c units range from 13-20 seer.

Good contractors may not offer "builder's special" 13-14 seer heatpumps, because better 14+ SEER units tend to have safety switches which cut the power when there's a problem (like a refrigerant leak) to prevent compressor failure.

----------------------
With respect choosing between a heatpump and a/c, the following should be considered:

1. Cost of electricity, gas, propane/oil, etc
2. Climate
3. Heat loss VS heat gain -> heatpumps in homes which need far more heating than cooling might struggle in cold weather. Heatpumps have to be sized for cooling in humid climates to avoid moisture problems.
4. House construction -> HPs may not do well in poorly insulated homes.
5. Ductwork -> A/Cs and heatpumps aren't as forgiving as furnaces when it comes to airflow and distribution
6. Homeowner's preference - > Some people may not like the luke-warm supply air HPs put out. Below 45F the supply air can be well below body temperature
7. Extra cost
8. Extra maintenance ->Heatpumps have more things to go wrong than normal a/c units. In colder climates, HPs run a lot and probably don't last as long as a/c units.
9. The existing heat source. A heatpump is an easy choice over an a/c in homes which have electric heat. (not so much when the primary source of heat is a furnace and it drops below freezing frequently. In that application, HPs are of limited usefulness)
 
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Old 02-27-13, 04:55 PM
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To Kevin and Muggie: Thanks for the information, now it makes some sense. Appreciate the time and information.
 
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