Any reason to not remove baseboard heaters?

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Old 08-05-13, 08:59 AM
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Any reason to not remove baseboard heaters?

I am renting out an upper/lower duplex. The lower tenant has a gas furnace that works fine. That tenant also has baseboard heaters in all the rooms that are no longer connected to the breaker box.

Is there any reason to not ;
1) take all the baseboard heaters out,
2) Remove all stray wires to heaters (all fed from basement and easily accessible),
3) Remove all thermostats and related wires (assuming I can pull them out),
4) Remove breakers from the box (I assume I need to cover with a plate after).

The only issue I can see is #3. If I cannot remove those wires, do I need to just cap all the ends and make sure the openings are accessible?

Thank you,
 
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Old 08-05-13, 02:35 PM
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1) There not used or connected so take them out.
2) No reason not to. Personally I like to keep all my systems clean.
3) See #2 You should be able to pull them out. Cap them at both ends if you can't.
4) Not sure if you can find covers for the open spaces, you should have them covered and in that case simply leave the breakers there, turned off and identified as not used.
 
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Old 08-05-13, 02:45 PM
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Cut the wires which you can't pull too short for anyone to connect anything to them or wire nut them all together (to create a direct short), and stuff them in the wall and patch it. Do the same below where they enter the wall cavity. They don't have to remain accessible.
 
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Old 08-05-13, 03:44 PM
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wire nut them all together (to create a direct short), and stuff them in the wall and patch it. Do the same below where they enter the wall cavity. They don't have to remain accessible.
I was under the impression that all wires, even if unused, needed to be accessible. Nice to know I don't need t have silly looking plates all over the place.
 
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Old 08-05-13, 04:33 PM
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If you have a new primary source of heat (gas) then the baseboard water heat is obsolete. Chances are you will never go back so I would take it out and redeem the copper for scrap and buy yourself a dinner on the rental property.
 
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Old 08-05-13, 05:33 PM
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Not sure how much copper is in electrical baseboard heaters, but maybe I can get the little lady a taco.
 
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Old 08-05-13, 05:41 PM
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yes, I would remove them..............
 
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Old 08-06-13, 08:37 AM
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Presumably the reason for removing them is aesthetic - good housekeeping etc.
On the other side of the argument:

If they are functional and not ugly or in the way, some reasons for leaving them - and even reconnecting them might be:
1) you might get a tenant who hates gas in his home - the smell or noise or explosion risk or ...
2) when the gas furnace or gas supply fails, there is a heating backup already in place
3) you might get a tenant (e.g. elderly frail) who likes or needs it toasty - so both gas and electric heat could be used for those extra btus
4) if the tenant pays utilities why not offer the option
5) you save yourself and the tenant the hassle and effort of removal
 
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Old 08-06-13, 09:01 AM
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Thank you for the flip side.

1) you might get a tenant who hates gas in his home - the smell or noise or explosion risk or ...
2) when the gas furnace or gas supply fails, there is a heating backup already in place
3) you might get a tenant (e.g. elderly frail) who likes or needs it toasty - so both gas and electric heat could be used for those extra btus
4) if the tenant pays utilities why not offer the option
5) you save yourself and the tenant the hassle and effort of removal
Given the price difference here between natural gas and electric, I don't see anyone choosing electric (sadly, only the lower unit has NG forced air. I live in the upper and have to put up with high electric bills). I also would prefer to not have 240 lines running in the walls if I do not need them.

Personally, I find them to be in the way and unattractive. But, as you pointed out, that is just my opinion and prospective tenants might feel differently.

Given the above reasons, and my reasonable skill, I will remove them and hold onto them (was going to hold onto them anyway). I'll reinstall if requested, but I think they'll just get tossed in a couple years.
 
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Old 08-14-13, 08:30 PM
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If you think there is any possible re-installation, make sure you leave yourself enough wire to reconnect.
 
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