Hooking up Honeywell TH8320WF In place of Trane XT500 (old) Thermostat

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-30-13, 02:16 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hooking up Honeywell TH8320WF In place of Trane XT500 (old) Thermostat

I need help hooking up thermostat. Have hooked up a few and this one is throwing me for a loop. This is how I have somewhat configured if you see anything that doesn't look right let me know these are kind statements and questions as one. I also have a light blue wire wrapped around all of these wires coming out of the wall.


Trane hook up

Red wire went to R on trane thermostat

Off colored white with white paint went to B on Trane

Orange wire went to O on trane

Yellow wire went to Y on Trane

Black wire went to X2 on Trane

White wire went to W1 on Trane.


Honeywell thermostat TH8320WF

Red wire went to R on Honeywell with Jumper to RC.

Orange wire not sure on one side of terminal it has an W for white? conventional side then on the other side of terminal it says O/B Heat Pump side.

Yellow wire goes to Y yellow

Green wire goes to G for green

Off white wire (maybe very very light Brown) goes to C as I have read Trane does things a little different. This is also the off white wire with white paint strip as described above that went to B on the Trane Thermostat.

Black wire which was in X2(on Trane thermostat ) goes to the terminal marked E/Aux on the heat pump side and W2 on the conventional side?.

That leaves white wire from Trane thermostat slot W1 goes where on Honeywell Thermostat as I have Orange wire in the O/B terminal(heat pump side which also has W for white on conventional.
 
Attached Images    
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-30-13, 05:11 AM
Houston204's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,426
Received 17 Votes on 14 Posts
Your old thermostat supports more stages of heat than your new stat.
I would tape it off and push it back into the wall.

Honeywell recently discontinued separate Aux and E terminals on their 8000 series. Now you are stuck with the question of too much electric heat for stage 2 or not enough electric heat for emergency heat should the heat pump fail.
 
  #3  
Old 08-30-13, 06:22 AM
firedawgsatx's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,727
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
On a Trane system the light blue wire normally is connected to the common terminal on the thermostat. This wire comes directly from the transformer low voltage common wire. On your Trane thermostat the B terminal is the common. On your Honeywell 'stat it is the C terminal. This wire provides constant 24VAC to power your thermostat so it does not have to run off batteries. Batteries are then only for backup. Color codes on wires do not really mean a whole lot because some installers use different methods of wire colors. There is pretty much a standard but not always followed. You need to go to the air handler and see where the off colored white wire with paint is connected. Here is the normal wiring for a Trane heat pump:

Red- (R) jumpered to RC (R is heating power and comes from low voltage side of transformer)
(RC) is cooling power (jumpered to R)
Yellow (Y)is 1st stage compressor contactor
Green (G)is fan relay
Blue (C) is common wire from low voltage side of transformer
Orange (O/B) is to energize reversing valve for heat pumps. Trane energizes in cool.
White (W1) is 1st stage heat
Black (X2) is emergency heat

As Houston204 stated your new thermostat does not have separate terminals for auxiliary and emergency heat. On the old Honeywell 'stats the white wire went to the Aux terminal and the black wire (X2) went to E terminal. So on your new thermostat anytime your condenser goes into defrost mode or call for auxiliary/emergency heat your heat strips/ (if you have them) back-up heat source are going to be energized to temper the air (in defrost mode) or to supplement your heat.

So at this point, the question is:

Is your blue wire the common wire that should power your thermostat? How is the off-colored white wire with paint connected at the air handler.

Check the transformer and follow the blue wire leaving the secondary side to see where it connects with the thermostat wire bundle going to the thermostat.

Locate the off-color white wire in the air handle and see which wire it is connected to. You said it was connected to the B terminal on the Trane 'stat.

As far as the White wire and Black wire for Aux and Emergency heat you will have to decide how you want those to be wired. As Houston 204 said, "it will question of too much electric heat for stage 2 or not enough electric heat for emergency heat should the heat pump fail".

You also need to ensure you have the new thermostat properly configured for your system using the installer's setup.
 
  #4  
Old 08-30-13, 10:36 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks so much for your feedback I will check it in a little bit. I'll post pictures of the air handle ect
 
  #5  
Old 08-30-13, 07:17 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What should I do if I don't want or care about emergency heat only regular heat. I have a wood stove for heat. The off white wire with paint is defiantly the constant power as the thermostate works with no battery. should the orange wire go to terminal O/B? And the white wire in E/Aux as I have it?
 
  #6  
Old 08-30-13, 07:41 PM
firedawgsatx's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,727
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, the orange wire normally goes to O/B to energize the reversing valve and the white wire is for auxiliary heat. The auxiliary heat normally comes on during the defrost mode and when the heat pump can't maintain the temperature and drops by 2 degrees below the set temperature. If the off-white wire works as a constant 24V source to power your thermostat that is fine. What is the blue wire connected to in the air handler?
 
  #7  
Old 08-30-13, 08:13 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The light blue wire that is on some of the first pictures goes to nothing. Their is a dark blue wire that can be seen in the picture attached.
 
Attached Images  
  #8  
Old 08-30-13, 08:20 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So I don't need black wire.
 
  #9  
Old 08-31-13, 07:29 AM
firedawgsatx's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,727
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sometimes installers don't follow the normal wiring. He apparently used the off-white wire instead of the light blue wire normally used on Trane to power the 'stat. What is the dark blue connected to? As far as the black wire it is normally for emergency heat. There should be a black wire at the condenser that ties in at the air handler. Without knowing how your system is wired/configured for auxiliary/emergency heat for the defrost mode and to supplement the heat pump it is difficult to say if you "need" it.
 
  #10  
Old 08-31-13, 12:09 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've hooked the wiring up to thermostat and have turned the system on cool but their is no cool air it's actually very warm what could that mean. Ill get into the air handle tonight and take a serious look at wiring and get back to you thanks for your help
 
  #11  
Old 08-31-13, 05:49 PM
Houston204's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,426
Received 17 Votes on 14 Posts
Set option 170 to 7 (heat pump with Aux heat)



 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: