American Standard Heat Pump, House cold!

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Old 11-24-13, 07:32 PM
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American Standard Heat Pump, House cold!

The heat wont keep the inside temp when it gets really cold outside. Currently its 22 degrees outside and my unit is only heating to 66 degrees inside with the thermostat set at 73. The stat doesn't get turned off or down at all. If I turn the emergency heat on the air from the vents gets extremely warm and the unit will heat the house just fine, but obviously I don't want to pay for eheat all winter.

Last winter I replaced the defrost thermostat and defrost thermostat board because the exterior coil was icing up and not defrosting. We just come out of a decently warm summer and the unit didn't struggle at all cooling the house.

Any ideas ?

As always, thanks in advance for any help.
 
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Old 11-24-13, 07:45 PM
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Your system may require the use of emergency heat when it's 22f outside. You can only extract so much heat from cold air.

How did it perform in previous years ?
 
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Old 11-24-13, 07:50 PM
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Yes a heat pump as you most likely have will only heat to 40f or so with out door temps....

Yes we are cold here in NJ too.... 20F tonight....

Thats why they have heat strips in your neck of the woods...

use it and be warm ....
 
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Old 11-24-13, 09:26 PM
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Last year in the winter it gave me fits, exterior coil freezing up an what not. That's why I had to replace the defrost tstat an board. I ran off plug in heaters most of the winter in conjunction with whatever the heat pump put out. Just recently replaced the 2 items above hoping to not have issues this winter.

While I do understand that you can only extract so much heat from cold air, the auxiliary or emergency heat is there to help supplement I thought for when that happens?

When the inside thermostat is on emergency heat, the vents blow warm air but with it on just heat and the inside thermostat showing aux on as well, it doesn't seem to blow as warm.
 
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Old 11-24-13, 10:08 PM
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Have been running emergency heat to get the inside temp back up. With the inside thermostat set to 73, and the current inside temp at 70, the temp is dropping with just the heat on by itself, even with the thermostat showing aux on the display like its using part of the emergency heat to supplement.

Just going to have to run emergency heat tonight, planning on checking all my wiring for the inside thermostat and unit thermostat defrost board but I am pretty sure everything is hooked up right.

Is checking the heating elements as easy as throwing an ohm meter on it an either getting or not getting continuity out the elements inside the unit? Would I need to take them out of the circuit first or ?
 
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Old 11-25-13, 09:15 PM
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The heating coils are either normal or open. You can check them connected with an ohmmeter but make sure the AC power is off to the unit. There could be more than one breaker controlling those heating coils.
 
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Old 11-25-13, 09:36 PM
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This thread has some really misleading replies.

The emergency heat mode should only be used when the heatpump is broken or it's too cold for it to supply any heat. If the aux heat isn't coming on as it should, something is wrong.

In normal heat mode, the t-stat should automatically bring on the auxiliary heat when the heatpump is still supplying heat but not enough to maintain your setting.

At 22F you should still be getting heat out of the outdoor air more efficiently than heating elements, but not enough to keep the house warm without a bit of help.

You'll be in for some very high electric bills if you run the system in emergency heat mode all winter.
 
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Old 11-25-13, 09:42 PM
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Have been running emergency heat to get the inside temp back up. With the inside thermostat set to 73, and the current inside temp at 70, the temp is dropping with just the heat on by itself, even with the thermostat showing aux on the display like its using part of the emergency heat to supplement.
The next step is to see if the t-stat isn't energizing the aux heat.

Remove the t-stat from the base and tell us how it's wired. (or take a picture) Emergency heat may or may not be done through the same wire as aux heat depending how your system was installed. With that info I could tell you which terminals to jumper to rule out the t-stat.

Emergency heat works, so at least part of the heat kit (set of elements) is working.

---------------------
Traditional heatpumps btw, are not the most suitable for areas where the temp drops below freezing frequently, but still a bit better than electric alone. (poor performance in cold weather, more repairs)
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:25 PM
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same problem York

I'm having the same problem. Have had multiple HVAC pros tell me it's just the way heat pumps work (or don't work if that is true). I can't believe this. I'm laying in bed under my electric blanket with the heat pump running non-stop. Set at 72, outside temp is 9, aux is on but the temp in this house is 62 something is not right. I absolutely hate this heat pump. I would much rather pay a $250 gas bill and be comfortable than the $355 electric bill and freeze. I'm searching the internet to see if I can find a solution so I'm ready next time I pay someone to come out and they tell me that it's just the way heat pumps work.
I've had the outside unit freeze up, replaced the board and 2 switches. Not a problem now.
Had a licensed HVAC pro install a new thermostat and when I look I see that the aux is connected correctly there.
Had the unit charged last summer. (it is 5 years old and needed a little charge)

I'm not sure what to do now...keep paying these guys to tell me that is the way a heat pump works?
 
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Old 02-10-14, 04:33 PM
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heat pump blues

Original threader... Heat pumps if sized correctly, will produce approx 3.4 KW of heat for every KW used to produce it. The drawback is this is only at around 42-45F.
It looses efficiency, to what is refered to as the balance point (approx 27F). At this temperature, its even with strip heat. This is where strip heaters are sized to add the additional heat required for lower temperatures to the design temp required in your neck of the woods. Only 3 days a year should it fail to keep 65F, if properly sized (never seen it yet, most lack the confidence in the numbers and starting adding 10%).
Many condensing units have a outdoor limit that disables the outdoor unit at 10F.
When the outdoor unit is in heating mode it energizes a reversing valve, this in turn sends discharge line hot gas to the indoor unit.
Step one, when the unit is in heat mode after 10 minutes feel the discharge line outside, the insulated one coming out of the unit. Question one,,,... is it hot if so, is the insulation around this pipe is good condition? Bad installers will use 3/8 wall insulation, good installers use 3/4-1" wall armorflex insulation. This will maintain that temp to the indoor units coil. If the fat pipe isnt hot, the reversing valve may not be energized ie. running ac and the strip heaters....ouch.......
 
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Old 02-11-14, 10:15 AM
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dlsheph:
This is not the way a heat pump system should work.
There could be several different things in the control wiring thermostat - handler - heat-pump , and the jumper settings on the defrost control board in the outdoor unit, that may not be configured properly.
I've had some experience fiddling with these things on my York heat pump - chances are it's similar to yours, my impression is that York does the controls different from most manufacturers.
What is the model number of the outdoor unit, of the air-handler, what are the sizes of your electric resistance auxiliary heaters in the air-handler, what thermostat do you have.
Are you up to looking at the wiring connections and jumper settings at the thermostat, air-handler, outdoor unit ?

Since this is a little off the original topic of this thread maybe the moderator will move it to a separate thread ...
 
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