Upgrade to 13 SEER Heat Pump Now or Wait?

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Old 11-17-15, 12:22 PM
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Upgrade to 13 SEER Heat Pump Now or Wait?

I have a 12 year old Goodman CPLE30-1C heat pump with a SEER rating of 10. I found out today that the DOE is making it mandatory that all heat pumps manufactured after January 1, 2015 must be 14 SEER minimum. However, apparently there is a grace period of 18 months to sell and install equipment with a lesser SEER rating as long as the equipment was manufactured prior to 1/1/15. First of all, is this true, and second, should I replace my heat pump now as opposed to waiting? I'm inclined to do it now because I have a fairly new 13 SEER air handler that was replaced three years ago and I'd like to have a matching system. I found several places still selling 2014 SEER 13 Goodman heat pumps online. If I wait, I'll have no choice but to get a 14 SEER and will then have a slightly mismatched system (no, I'm not going to replace the indoor unit). However, I currently have a 10 SEER HP with 13 SEER air handler and it seems to be fine. Should I hurry and get a 13 SEER heat pump or am I over-reacting?
 
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Old 11-17-15, 07:24 PM
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If you're going to replace your heat pump, do it quick! The reason is because there's a temp threshold where it gets really had to properly charge your unit using superheat/subcool. Yes, you can do it, when it's freezing out, but the odds are, your HVAC tech will be charging by weight then come spring, they'll need to comeback once outside temps warm up.

Also, if you replace, make sure to replace your evap coil with one that matches your new condenser. Once you know which condenser you want, you can check the AHRI directory to find a matching coil. https://www.ahridirectory.org/ahridi...ultSearch.aspx

If your current system is R22, you'll want to replace your line set too. If that's not possible, make sure it's flushed really good with Rx11 or the likes. You do NOT want to contaminate your new system with mineral oil from the R22 setup.


I've got way to much info on the swap because I just did this as a DIY project, so if you have questions let me know..

BTW, unless you plan on getting EPA certified and getting all the recovery equipment and other tools, this isn't really a DIY project... And if you buy your equipment online, you might have issues finding a local HVAC company to do the install.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 06:10 AM
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I planned on having the lineset replaced and the coil flushed, since it is only four years old. If replacing the coil isn't that much more expensive, then I may consider it.

I understand the issue with getting a heat pump online and finding someone that will install it, but it's in my nature to want to get a good deal and I know there is a lot of price gouging going on in the industry. I've heard numbers like $8,000 or $9,000 for a complete Goodman or Bryant system installed, which is ludicrous. If I can find an honest and reputable contractor that will show me the price breakdown, then I would feel better about it. Handing me an estimate with some chicken scratch explanation and a grand total doesn't cut it. I want to know how much for the new heat pump, brand and model indicated, what type of coil, how much for the lineset, how much for the freon, labor, etc., etc. Wishful thinking maybe, but that's how it should be. I know someone that will do the install and I have a home warranty for any issues that may arise down the road, so I'm not really worried about it. I think I'll hold off until the spring. Everything appears to be running fine and I have a gas heater for supplemental or emergency heat if I need it.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 07:29 AM
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The only issue I see is parts. Will you still be able to find parts for a 13 SEER in 5 years? 14 SEER you will. Plus you will have the bit of energy savings.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 08:59 AM
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airman,

It's funny, but parts are the last thing I would be worried about. There are compressors 10+ years old and parts are still available. Plus, I think there's some law out there that says parts have to available for so many years after a product is discontinued... Maybe that applies to autos only, but I know there's a law about it...

mossman,

I bought my HP/coil online, even though I had access to a couple of local supply houses. pricing was similar (Wholesale vs online pricing), but I wanted what I wanted.. which happened to be Rheem. Originally I was looking at Goodman/Amanda, Ducane, Nordyne and a few other brands the local supply houses had, but I went with Rheem because of it's shape. There was a supply house not far from me that handles Rheem, but they only did special orders for Rheem, so I just went with the best price I could find online.

BTW, I don't know if you know this or not, but Goodman heat pumps don't have demand defrost. It might not matter to you, but for whatever reason, it did to me...
 
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Old 11-18-15, 09:31 AM
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BTW, I don't know if you know this or not, but Goodman heat pumps don't have demand defrost. It might not matter to you, but for whatever reason, it did to me...
Why would I need that if the HP has a defrost board? In case the board fails?
 
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Old 11-18-15, 09:46 AM
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The defrost board on the Goodman is timed.. It's not based on need. Why get a HP that's going to suck the heat from your home, to defrost the unit, when it's not needed? Especially since it's going to have to run again to put the heat back in?
 
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