Can the vibration from a wall-mounted heat pump damage old brickwork?

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-11-19, 09:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Canada
Posts: 2
Can the vibration from a wall-mounted heat pump damage old brickwork?

I wonder if someone knowledgeable could give me their opinion. My question is, in your opinion, can a heat pump be mounted on an old brick wall? The brick is not collapsing or anything like that, but it is old with some flaking. Can the vibration damage the old brick?

I've just had installed a Fujitsu airconditiong heat pump. I live in an old (100 years old) apartment block of three apartments. I'm on the top floor. The company installed the device on the back balcony. The balcony sits on top of an enclosed structure the neighbor on the second floor built on their balcony directly below. It forms a little room. It adjoins their bedroom. The neighbor is complaining of vibration from the unit in her balcony enclosed-room and in the connecting bedroom. I have yet to confirm it. I will check this out first. I have contacted the installer and they will come tomorrow and install a rubber pad underneath the heat pump. They have stated clearly there is nothing else they can do.

Before the unit was installed, I asked if the pump could be mounted on the brick wall on the side of the building. They said they couldn't do it because the vibration from the unit can damage old masonry / brick. I got the impression they just didn't want to do it because it's high up. I let it go. I didn't want to make unnecessary work. However, I now fear it might be the only option. I have looked on the internet and I can't find any mention of mounting a heat pump on old brick being a problem. In your opinion, can a heat pump be mounted on old brick without the vibration damaging the brick? I don't want to be difficult with the installer, but if the vibration the neighbor is experiencing is extreme and cannot be insulated against, then...I don't know what I can do other than mount it on the side wall.

We also have a sort of external enclosed wall next to the balcony. It has a wooden wall. Could the pump be mounted on the wood wall. I'm not sure it's solid enough to support the pump. It's quite large. And it might cause the same type of vibration being over the neighbor's balcony-room.

Finally, could it be installed on the roof of the building? I live in Canada. We get lots of snow and wind and the roof is also hard to access.

Thanks in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-11-19, 11:47 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 49,430
Welcome to the forums.

In your opinion, can a heat pump be mounted on old brick without the vibration damaging the brick?
In my opinion..... yes..... it can be mounted to old brickwork. With that being said..... only an inspection of the actual brickwork could determine its integrity.

Wherever it's mounted to a building you will hear some vibration from it.
Doesn't sound like the roof would be a viable location.
 
  #3  
Old 04-12-19, 04:17 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3,566
Hi, is there space on the ground where the unit could be placed on a pad and piped up the outside wall, 3 stories might be a bit much, we do 2 stories in Fl.
Just a thought
Geo
 
  #4  
Old 04-13-19, 06:11 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,867
As far as mouning an AC on a brick wall in my circles it is not a good practice to actually fasten to the brick itself.
Bricks are fairly small and only held in place with mortar.
Good practice would have you drill through the brick and fasten the load to the structuren not a thin veneer like brick.

As far as roof and ground mounting locations the answer to that question is located in the installation manual.
Many units have extended distances between indoor and outdoor units but you must follow mfr's instructions carefully.
To me the roof would seem like the best option considering it is closer and more secure than ground level.

Post the make and exact model of the indoor and outdoor units and maybe someone knows what the location limitations are for your unit.
 
  #5  
Old 04-14-19, 09:20 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Canada
Posts: 2
The installer already supplied some mats, and they have installed more. We went down and listened in the neighbor's before and after. The sound / vibration was faint before, and even fainter after. The neighbor has converted her balcony (directly below mine) into a very small external room. It is in there she can hear a faint vibration. It's audible, but barely. I can understand she can hear it if she's sitting in their quietly, but really I think she's being unreasonable.

I don't really see any alternative. We could mount the pump on the wooden wall which is above and to the die of and part of the structure of her balcony-room, but it could be louder there. Ultimately I don't think there is an alternative to the position, and the sound is not significant.

I don't believe installing the unit on the ground. That would hardly be fair on the ground-floor owner (!), and there is lots of snow there in the winter. The snow is very exposed to wind and snow in the winter, and hard to access. The model is Fujitsu. I'll have to look up the model.

Thanks for your comments. I greatly appreciate it. The information will be useful for the future.
 
  #6  
Old 04-14-19, 10:51 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 19,274
It sounds like you are going above and beyond to be a good neighbor. At some point I hope your downstairs neighbor realizes that living in a city comes with a bit of noise.
 
  #7  
Old 04-14-19, 01:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,076
Originally Posted by rainbowman
My question is, in your opinion, can a heat pump be mounted on an old brick wall? The brick is not collapsing or anything like that, but it is old with some flaking. Can the vibration damage the old brick?
For old brick, I'd be more concerned about the weight of the unit and the condensation/humidity than the vibration.

Yes, you can mount an A/C unit on a brick wall, but remember
you're NOT mounting "on" individual brickS, you're mounting on the entire wall

You'll want something to spread the load - old fashioned "star bolts"


Oh, BTW, a dripping A/C unit will annoy the heck out of downstairs tenants.
A little drip irrigation hose to repurpose that water,



and your downstairs neighbors may shift from annoyance to envy.

Also works for vegetables
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 04-14-19 at 01:25 PM.
  #8  
Old 04-15-19, 11:55 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,076
Forgot to mention - you always want to span the load across multiple bricks.

Notice the fire escape with the "A" bracket at the middle-leftmost-window supporting the ladder by spreading the load across multiple rows of bricks.

The green wall shows modern "half-I-beam" tiebacks that span the loads across multiple bricks.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes