Heat for 4 season room

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  #1  
Old 08-28-19, 07:05 AM
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Heat for 4 season room

I'm in MA. I had always assumed I'd put electric radiant in my new 14x14 4-season room, but for $1600 for 6500 btus, the 10000 btus for $105 I get from electric baseboard is looking much more attractive. The heat loss shows I need 9500 btus for 0 deg / 70 deg.

Any advice on this?

Thanks.
 
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Old 08-28-19, 06:21 PM
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Had you planned on cooling the area too ?
Have you considered a heat pump mini split system ?

It will cost more upfront but will save energy and probably recover faster in the winter.
 
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Old 08-28-19, 10:17 PM
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How is the rest of you house heated? Personally, I can't stand to pay the cost of electric heat so I shut my sunroom down for a few months a year.
 
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Old 08-29-19, 07:45 AM
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The room is off of the living room. It will not have cooling. The house is baseboard, but in the winter months if there is a real cold streak below freezing, we use a wood stove, which is in the basement, and it is able to heat the 1st floor to 76 or 77 if we want it to. I'm thinking we can just open the door and let some of this heat go into the 4season, but also wanted it's own heat for comfort. The 3000W the room 'needs' costs about 36 / hr, which isn't too bad.
 
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Old 08-29-19, 01:32 PM
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3 seasons or 4 seasons? Wouldn't a 4 seasons room be in essence, part of your house? And if that were the case, a loop off the existing baseboard should heat it. If it's a 3 seasons room, not insulated like your house is, then you could zone that room off the boiler and control it with a t-stat when you wanted a little heat out there.
 
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Old 08-30-19, 05:22 AM
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at 36 cents an hour (ouch) Id put a ductless in that will heat to -10 and be able to cool in the summer.
 
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Old 08-30-19, 08:28 PM
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The 3000W the room 'needs' costs about 36 / hr, which isn't too bad.
Yeah..... ouch.

Baseboard heat has slow recovery so it will be running pretty much continuously
which could mean a bill of $8 a day.
 
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Old 08-31-19, 10:53 AM
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Hi, how did you get the heat loss? I believe that electric baseboard heat is figured in Watts/sq’ so that would be roughly 200 sq’ and if figured at 20 watts per Sq’ that would be 4KW , I hope this is right as I just had a Supplyhouse calculate a room for me and they used 15 watts/ sq’, in NH.
Geo
 
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