Heat Pump With Low Air Flow and Dust Everywhere


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Old 10-25-20, 07:54 PM
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Heat Pump With Low Air Flow and Dust Everywhere

Hello,

I have recently purchased a 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom condo built in 2003 which has a Heat Pump. I have never owned a home with a heat pump and I have a questions about air flow, etc.

- When I turned on the 'cool' or AC over the weekend, I noticed there was not very much air flow out of all of the ducts in the entire condo. I am not sure if this is the nature of a heat pump, etc? Basically I am trying to determine if I need a professional to come out to my home to measure air flow pressure, etc? Since there is a condo unit above me, it appears there is no access to the ducts if the ducts are 'leaky'.

- Also, if you look at the attached pictures, it looks like this system is very poorly designed (I think). I have checked all of the vents around my condo and it looks the only 'return' is through this louvered door. From the pictures, the problem with this is that everything behind this door including the hot water tank is full of dust because it 'sucks' air through the louvers and into the system.

I am not sure what I should ask or have my local HVAC repair company come out to address. Basically should I look for a company that can measure airflow, etc? Also, is there something that should be done to the door / system to prevent dust from getting everywhere? The filter is on the bottom of the unit as you can see.

Thanks in advance!




 
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Old 10-25-20, 08:03 PM
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The filter looks to be ill fitted. Have you inspected it to determine if there is a problem with it?
 
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Old 10-25-20, 11:17 PM
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Really not much your going to be able to do, there may be a multi speed blower motor in there that could be adjusted, maybe!

Dust has nothing to do with the furnace, it just distributes what is in the house!
 
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Old 10-26-20, 01:39 AM
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In a small area that is a typical setup with the air handler mounted in a closet and drawing return air thru the louvered door. Have you pulled the filter out and checked its condition ?
 
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Old 10-26-20, 06:59 AM
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It'd be helpful to know make and M/N of indoor and outdoor units, as well as type and condition of filter.
 
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Old 10-30-20, 04:39 AM
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SandburRanch - you are correct about the filter. It is the correct size, but poor fitting.

Marq1 - I plan to have my local HVAC tech come out to my home to take a look.

PJmax - the filter looks like it was changed at regular intervals (an older gentlemen had a small calendar tapped to the unit) and was in fact clean when I purchased the condo.

ferd42 - I'll try to post the M/N of the indoor and outdoor unit. As far as the filter goes, as mentioned, it was in good shape. That being said, after a little digging around and re-reading my home inspection report, I first need to have the coils cleaned. I have an appointment with my local HVAC guy to come out and take a look.
 
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Old 10-31-20, 01:17 AM
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Thanks. There appear to be four bricks supporting the unit AND obstructing the unit's intake opening. I'm curious to see how high the velocity is across the unobstructed part of the filter.
 
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Old 10-31-20, 01:21 AM
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Also, the type of filter - Pleated or conventional "Throwaway Filter"? Manufacturer make and model if possible.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 04:50 AM
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Vacuum out as much dist and dirt out in the open within the closet as you can. It is worth owning a vacuum cleaner with a hose and various attachments to put on the end.

Furnace and heat pump manufactureres recommend having a professional do the cleaning inside the unit because it is important not to bend or move the tubes or other parts inside.

That dust probably took several months as opposed to several days to accumulate.

Typical furnace filters come in coarse, medium coarse, fine, and hepa (superfine). Use the coarse or mediium except when your furnace is designed for the better grades or you slow down the blower motor.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 12:43 PM
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ferd42 - The model of the indoor unit is a Carrier FA4ANF024 and the outdoor unit is a Bryant 661CJ024-E. As far as the filter is concerned, I have attached a picture, but it looks like they are just your standard pleated filter. I have also attached a picture of the underneath area where the bricks are indeed blocking part of the filter.

Allanj - I have tried vacuuming as much of the dust as I can (I'm still working on that part). As mentioned, I am currently using a standard pleated filter, but I guess I should switch to a coarse or medium filter which incidentally will be cheaper :-)
 
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Old 11-02-20, 02:43 AM
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That's 2 tons, 800 CFM (cubic feet per minute). Filter face velocity is 412 FPM (feet per minute), which is quite high for a pleated filter without considering the bricks. You should lose the pleated and provide a "throwaway filter" w/ MERV 4 or lower rating. And find another way to support the unit to eliminate the restriction created by the bricks. You should notice improved airflow.
 
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Old 11-02-20, 07:34 AM
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Thanks so much @ferd42! That is great info
 
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Old 11-05-20, 02:10 PM
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AND if you can live the aesthetics of a higher door undercut (another 1/2" or so) knock yourself out. Louvered doors don't have a lot of "Free Area" what with the thick blades.
 
 

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