ID and Advice for old Payne Heat Pump


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Old 01-10-21, 01:12 PM
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ID and Advice for old Payne Heat Pump

Hi Folks,


This thing is at least 30 Years old AFAIK

Original Thermostat

Small un-provisioned pipe

Large un-provisioned pipe. Also shows the rest of the unit that has never been provisioned.

I've got an old heat pump in house I'm working on but it seems like it's only operating as a stand-alone electric furnace ($$$-gulp!). Can someone help me understand how this thing is supposed to work?

There are currently no fluid pipes connected. There's no radiator/condenser pack outside the house -- only a 40A feeder circuit. Pictures tell the story.
There's one 3/4" copper pipe that's never been provisioned, leading down out of the attic - not sure where terminated.
There's one 3/8" copper pipe that's also never been provisioned, leading the same direction.

-How would this normally be hooked up?
-What would those provisional pipes be for? (I'm assuming I'd need 2 pipes for the exterior circuit but wouldn't they be the same diameter? (or different due to pressure difference for egress/return pipes?).
-How many exterior pipes would ordinarily be required (from unit to the exterior cube) - Assuming I only need Heating, not Cooling.

-Is it worth repairing and what are my options? .. i.e. adding an external heat exchanger (compressor?), Ground source, water source (i have a well nearby) etc..?

In this application, the house is off the gas grid so all heat is electric of some sort.

Regards,
Dave
 
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Old 01-10-21, 01:28 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Not sure what you are asking.
If you're asking if an outside condenser should now be installed and connected to the air handler/electric furnace after 30 years...... the answer would be no.

You must be in a warm climate or have excellent electric rates to heat the house solely on resistive elements.
There would be two copper lines connecting the evaporator coil to the outside condenser.
There would also be at least one 3/4" PVC drain line.
A dedicated 240v 30A circuit would also be needed for the outside condenser.
 
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Old 01-11-21, 08:52 AM
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Thanks Pete,
The house is in Northern California - Electric isn't cheap but AFAIK, the folks living there previously primarily heated using a wood stove so there's very little use of the thing.

Are the external condenser pipes identically sized? at that age, I'm guessing the smaller of the two pipes was for condensate and the second condenser pipe (3/4") was never installed.

-Dave
 
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Old 01-11-21, 09:21 AM
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The two copper refrigerant lines are different sizes. They are sized based on system tonnage.
The small line is the liquid or supply line and the larger one is the vapor or return line.
 
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Old 01-11-21, 02:03 PM
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Ah, I thought that might be the case but I've never worked on a heat-pump system before.
Thanks again,

-Dave

 
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Old 01-11-21, 03:39 PM
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Heat pump or split A/C works the same way. Two refrigerant lines.
A heat pump just changes refrigeration flow direction.
 
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