Heat Pumps


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Old 01-20-21, 10:44 AM
I
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Heat Pumps

Hello all,

Looking for some professional advise...

Currently I have a hot water base board system, and I am looking to reduce my cost of oil by installing a heat pump.

I live in Nova Scotia, so it can get pretty cold up here, and my worry is that with a heat pump, it will supplement to keep my house nice and warm, but my concern is the freezing of pipes due to lack of water circulation if a particular room(s) is maintained above the furnace cut in temp.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 
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Old 01-20-21, 10:55 AM
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Hot water systems can have anit-freeze added.
 
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Old 01-20-21, 11:47 AM
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This is true Grady, but I found that the anti-freeze does not actually keep the water liquid, but instead allows it to just 'slush' up as opposed to freezing.

I had anti-freeze in my last house and froze a pipe....or should I say the water slushed up and even raising the pressure slightly above 15 psi did not allow the (slush) to move around bends and corners etc...

I was forced to put space heaters and close off the room in an attempt to get the water moving again...
 
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Old 01-20-21, 05:35 PM
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my concern is the freezing of pipes due to lack of water circulation if a particular room(s) is maintained above the furnace cut in temp.
In a multizone system that is always a problem. It doesn't matter what is used to heat the water.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 06:42 AM
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In Maine, I have a heat pump (you'll love it) and keep my furnace about 55 degrees. You may want to run the furnace near normal when it gets below 20 outside since the hp loses efficiency about that point.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 07:20 AM
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Have you investigated air source to hot water heat pumps ? Since you have hydronic heating that might fit nicely.

I note a company called Maritime Geothermal (located in NewBrunswick) who sells a Nordic air to water system and seems to have several dealers in NovaScotia..

The air to water heatpumps seem to be the main ones sold in Europe ... maybe because, until recent years with global warming, airconditioning wasn't much needed ?
 
 

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