Cloth or plastic shower curtain?


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Old 03-25-11, 04:40 PM
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Cloth or plastic shower curtain?

I have no clue where to post this question but it pertains to a shower curtain.

What is the best shower curtain to use? The cloth like material curtains or the traditional plastic shower curtain?

is there any advantages to having one or the other?
 
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Old 03-25-11, 05:08 PM
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The fabric one looks nicer, but you will have to hang a liner (vinyl) behind it. I hang the liner on a separate rod for easier changing. Fabric will also cost more.
The plastic one stands alone but doesn't look as nice, however there are nicer print ones these days.
Otherwise, it's just a matter of preference.
 
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Old 03-25-11, 05:14 PM
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i figured they were more expensive but thought they may have prevented mildew or something like that......

thanks for the input
 
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Old 03-31-11, 07:20 PM
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Bed Bath & Beyond has white cloth shower liners that are mildew resistant. They hang really nicely and are easy to throw in the washer. Also, you can get them extra long for higher ceilings.
 
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Old 04-01-11, 07:02 AM
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Lots of liners are marked as "mildew resistant" but doesn't mean a thing. They're all washable.
 
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Old 04-01-11, 07:22 AM
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I'd get plastic for the liner - I have a microfiber one right now and I really hate it because it absorbs some of the water instead of shedding it all like a plastic one would

Of course, the best solution is to install doors....
 
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Old 04-26-11, 11:00 AM
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I found a beautiful shower curtain at Target that is a cross between fabric and plastic (if that makes any sense). It's a shabby chic looking design and I love it. It worked fine without a liner, but I noticed that the fabric in it would stain overtime from washing my hair after having it colored so I hung an extra liner. IMO the fabric ones look ten thousand times better and all you have to do is purchase a cheap vinyl liner. Here is the link to something similar to the one I bought (this was a few years ago so they don't sell the exact one anymore). Ruffles Shower Curtain : Target
 
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Old 05-09-11, 02:22 PM
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And, if it wuz me, I'd look in your yellow pages phone directory under "Steel, Speciality" and phone around to the places listed there to see where you can buy a standard 20 foot length of stainless steel 1 inch outside diameter tubing to replace the chrome plated steel tubing you have now. Chrome plated stainless steel tubing will soon rust when exposed to the mist of shower spray; whereas stainless steel won't. It'd be best to get together with 3 other neighbors, friends or co-workers so that you can all chip in to buy one length of tubing for about $40 and cut it into 4 five foot lengths.

Don't ask for a 5 foot length of tubing because the places that will be willing to order it for you will presume they won't sell the other 15 feet, so they'll want to charge you the full $40 for the 5 feet they sell you and will keep the remaining 15 feet hoping to sell that to someone else. That way, even if they end up throwing the other 15 feet away, they won't have lost any money by going out of their way to order the tubing for you. Better to buy a standard length and cut it into 4 rods.

A standard bathtub will be 5 feet long, but once you deduct the thickness of the drywall or plaster and ceramic tile at the front and back of the tub, you'll need a piece of tubing about 58 1/2 to 59 inches long to fit. An ordinary hack saw blade will cut stainless steel tubing.

The finish that most stainless steel tubing will come in will be called "180", meaning that it was polished to the equivalent surface smoothness of having been sanded with 180 grit sandpaper. This finish is smooth enough to be aesthetically attractive, but still has sufficient surface roughness to provide good grip if the tubing is being used to make handles or anything meant to be gripped. You can special order "polished" steel tubing it you're willing to pay extra for a smoother shinier finish.

And, of course, it's "tubing" and not "pipe" you want to be asking for. The word "pipe" implies that it's meant to be used to carry a fluid presumably under pressure, so "pipe" will have a much greater wall thickness and cost much more. You only need tubing to support a shower curtain, not pipe.

Considering you have to pay about $7 to $10 for a cheap chrome plated shower curtain rod that will rust on you in a few years, getting together with three friends to buy a 20 foot length of stainless steel tubing and making it into 4 shower curtain rods at $10 to $12 each (including sales tax) that will last indefinitely makes economic sense.
 
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Old 01-18-12, 04:53 AM
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Speaking of, I actually have used the cloth mildew resistant shower curtains from Bed, Bath and Beyond. They work really great. You could try those. Cloth looks so much better.
 
 

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