Smart plug on a hot water tank-is it safe?


  #1  
Old 11-20-22, 04:41 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Smart plug on a hot water tank-is it safe?

Hello all, I have a Watts 500800 recirculating system on my water tank. I am unsure if adding a smart plug is safe as far as amps or volts. This Watts is on a shelf in the garage with the set pins turned away from me when on a ladder. Can you advise on safety, a type of smart plug you have has success with as I only have an iPad to use an app. Thank you all.
 
  #2  
Old 11-20-22, 05:22 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: US
Posts: 988
Received 120 Likes on 104 Posts
After a quick look on the web, I find no mention of how much current the device requires. So there is no way to determine if the smart switch will supply current and not fail. The instructions state the pump is for use only with specific models of water heaters.

Why would you put a device with a timer on an outlet you can turn on and off? When you remove power you mess up any timming you programmed.

I'm no plumber, but I thought recirculating pumps went at the point of use.​​​​​​​
 
  #3  
Old 11-20-22, 06:19 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: SE Iowa
Posts: 144
Received 8 Likes on 8 Posts
From the Amazon webpage on the product, the pump is 0.22A.

https://www.amazon.com/Watts-500800-...000E78XHG?th=1

How many amps is the pump?
Answer:
The pump runs at .22 Amps, and recommended supply current of 2.5 Amps. A standard 15 Amp wall socket is all that you need to plug it into. The .22 Amps the pump indicates maximum start up current, actual running current will be somewhat lower. Inrush current is always higher, when the motor has to start up, actual running current will be lower, example a 1 HP motor will have an inrush current of about 34 Amps, just until the motor reaching normal operating speed then it drops down to around 7.5 Amps, quite a bit lower, but the breaker needs to be able to handle the inrush currents.

https://www.amazon.com/ask/questions...dp_dpmw_al_hza

There is even a review from a user that does use it with a smart plug. Looking at the manual you can leave the switch in ON (vs. Timer) to bypass the built in timer.
 
  #4  
Old 11-20-22, 06:39 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,726
Received 996 Likes on 905 Posts
I thought recirculating pumps went at the point of use.​​​​​​​
Kind of, they are typ on a given circuit but location can vary.

I am also unsure why you would want the switch controlled, if like my recirc it's a set and forget, at least until power goes off or daylight savings. Controlling the switch wont turn it on or off unless it set to run constant but that seems to be a real PITA switching it on/off when needed.
 
  #5  
Old 11-20-22, 06:46 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you for researching this. The main reason for a smart plug is my safety. I can avoid climbing a ladder. I am not able to see the tiny pins very well to adjust which control run times as they face away from me. I never turn on or off the outlet with the Watts unit as it is intended to have control via the unit settings. The recirculating pump is located at the point of use piped into the water tank line and the Watts unit is plugged into an outlet. Sorry if I did not explain this well enough.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: