Stereo Speaker Cabinets


  #1  
Old 07-31-04, 12:10 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Stereo Speaker Cabinets

I have a customer who wants me to make some new new speaker boxes. The old boxes are veneered particleboard with a recessed panel with circular cutouts for the speakers and crossovers. A cloth cover fits in the front to hide the speaker cones. Building nice boxes is a simple thing but what else should I be thinking of?

Anyone know of a good resource of basic do's and don'ts regarding making speaker boxes? The customer isn't an audiophile and his interest is mostly appearance.

Any input will be appreciated.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 07-31-04, 09:44 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 387
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You can get things like veneer, speaker jacks, grill cloth and drivers at www.partexpress.com. Look there or at radio shack for books on builkding speaker enclosures.

If you're building small speakers there isn't that much too it if you don't care about acoustics. Build the box as simple or complicated as you want. Make sure it is air tight.
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-04, 07:46 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,235
Received 65 Likes on 60 Posts
Dave_D1945,

Another idea is to build the enclosure to the same dimensions as the old one.
Woofers need specific enclosure volume, dampening material and dimensions to operate as designed.
However, you may alter the cabinet slightly to fine tune the sound.
You also have to ensure that if the old cabinet is a bass reflex design and has an opening, that you duplicate the diameter and lenght of the tuning extension.
Or, if an acoustic suspension box, that it be made completely airtight.

Building speakers was an enjoyable past-time, but although components are still available, are not as inexpensive and plentiful as they once were.
I recently discovered that Radio Shack in Canada has dropped speaker components, except for sub-woofers, from their store inventory.
They show a few online but can't be orderd in-store.
 
  #4  
Old 08-01-04, 02:51 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
I'm planning to build the new boxes the same size as the old ones. The customer's interest is appearance only. I just want to make sure I don't inadvertently build something that sounds like doggy-doo.

As it happens, I have another customer who manufactures high end stereo components and I make the cases for him. I asked him this question and got a virtual data dump. He's also planning to design some high end speakers so this project is a good learning curve. It's a good thing I remember my Mechanical Engineering schooling. I sorta remember stuff like resonance, dampening, and acoustic coupling.

These speakers are starting to look like a fun project.
 
  #5  
Old 08-01-04, 03:07 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,235
Received 65 Likes on 60 Posts
If you don't want information overload there are two things to keep in mind.

1. Make the new cabinet to roughly the same size as the old one.

2. The most important thing to remember is that there are two main types of cabinets. Sealed and ported.
It's important because the woofer can be damaged if you mix them up.
A speaker designed for a sealed cabinet will overextend and pop the cone if used in a ported enclosure and a ported speaker would produce less bass if you built a sealed box.

Once the boxes are built you can play around with the port length if ported and dampening material to fine tune the sound.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: