what has the best picture for home theatre


  #1  
Old 09-03-04, 04:36 PM
glenn h
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Question what has the best picture for home theatre

what type of tv gives you the best picture quality,
is it dlp, lcd, lcd rear projection, or plasma ?
any unbiased opinion would be welcome.
thanks
glenn
 
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Old 09-03-04, 05:35 PM
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Only YOU can make that decision.

Plasmas are nice, but too many have a shiney protective screen that reflects terribly. I installed a Dishnet HD receiver for a plasma set a while back and the reflections were horrible. Mainly due to a Lake home with lots of windows. Not an ideal Home Theater set up.

LCD, per sq. inch, is more expensive than plasma. And no one for sure can say exactly how long they will last.

I liked both the DLP(Samsung) and LCD projection(Sony)

I'm watching Truk Lagoon on DISCHD right now on my Sony. The underwater pictures are oustanding.
I got the Sony because of it's non-reflective screen.
And the LCD projections have a consumer replaceable bulb.

I guess I am a bit biased,
fred
 
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Old 09-04-04, 03:45 AM
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A good CRT still currently delivers the best picture.
 
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Old 09-04-04, 04:38 AM
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All crt television pictures look good because the screen is smaller.
Home Theater usually means larger. And large CRT's weigh a ton.

My 50" Sony LCDRP weighs 81 poiunds, and I'd compare the pic against any 34" crt.

fred
 
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Old 09-04-04, 07:23 PM
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You're forgetting that both rear and front projection units can use CRTs. If picture quality is the #1 consideration, I'd take a CRT RPTV over LCD, DLP or plasma. The others however, look much cooler, take up less space, are lighter, and still have very good PQ.
 
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Old 09-05-04, 09:52 AM
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Here are some FAQ's from HDTVVoice.com
With permission and prepared by thier Moderator 57U

CRT-based RPTVs

Advantages:

Least expensive per inch (available in sizes 40" - 80")
Easily repairable
Excellent colour rendition, including blacks
"Known quantity" for many years

Disadvantages:

Requires initial and periodic convergence and setup
Large, "ugly" black box (typically) (takes up floor space)
Susceptible to burn in, if not properly set up, operated.

There are no CRT-based RPTVs that can natively display 720P. If the TV accepts 720P it gets converted to 1080i or 480P, depending on the set.


Direct View HDTVs (Tube TVs)

Advantages:

Smaller size for some smaller rooms/entertainment centers (maximum size 40")
No need for convergence.
Better vertical viewing angle than RPTVs

Disadvantages:

If tube goes bad, repair cost is exorbitant - equivalent to cost of new TV
Horizontal resolution typically 700-1000 lines max (100-400 lines less than RPTVs depending on model)
Can burn in if not properly set up, operated.
Very heavy in the larger sizes.

There are no "consumer" Direct View TVs that can natively display 720P. If the TV accepts 720P it gets converted to 1080i or 480P, depending on the set.


LCD-based RPTVs

Advantages:

Light/compact for its screen size
High resolution - 720P (actually typically 768/788P) (720P is considered by many to be superior to 1080i, hence the higher price for these sets)
No need for convergence.
Less sensitive to burn in than CRTs, but still some greyscale degradation possible if abused.

Disadvantages:

Periodic lamp replacement - about 2 years - ~$200-$400.
More expensive than CRT-based RPTV
Doesn't display blacks as well as CRTs.


DLP-based RPTVs

Advantages:

Light/compact for its screen size
High resolution - 720P (720P is considered by many to be superior to 1080i, hence the higher price for these sets)
No need for convergence.
No possibility of burn in

Disadvantages:

Periodic lamp replacement - about 2 years - ~$200-$400.
More expensive than CRT-based RPTV
Doesn't display blacks as well as CRTs. May have "rainbow" effect.


Plasma

Advantages:

Sexy, thin, can hang on the wall
Available in sizes to 63" (expensive) (Very expensive 70-80" units have been announced recently)
Excellent resolution (768P typical)

Disadvantages:

Expensive
Does not display blacks as well as CRTs (some very expensive units are better at blacks than the cheap ones)
Susceptible to burn in if not properly set up, operated.
Some have difficulty with multiple inputs

Be careful - inexpensive plasma displays may be 480P only.
 
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Old 09-08-04, 03:03 AM
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I agree with all of those points. Until there are alot more 720p sources (blueray?), I'll still take CRT for pure picture quality.

If cost was no option, I'd take a DLP or LCD. We bought a new set last January, and went with a 64" Hitachi CRT RPTV. If I could have bought a smaller form factor set (DLP/LCD) with the same screen size and almost the same PQ for almost the same price, I would have gone DLP or LCD. Unfortunately that beast doesn't exist yet.
 
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Old 09-08-04, 06:54 PM
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Here is my two cents worth...

But first I have two questions. How big a screen do you want, and what will you be watching mostly (tv, DVD's...)?

My home theater system is in the living room and spends 90%+ of its time used for TV viewing. I went with the biggest direct view crt I could find (40" Sony XBR800). It can display any video signal you throw at it and it's square screen format works best with what we watch most (TV). The picture is "letterboxed" when watching movies, but that is less than 10% of the time it is used. If you watch mostly TV I'd stay away from the sexy $3'000 plasma's that are everywhere now.

If you watch mostly movies (wide screen format), I'd vote for a flat screen plasma and if your theater will be in the basement with no windows I'd think of a high end front projector. If you spend most of your time watching square format TV I'd stay away from a wide screen anything.

I have not seen a rear projection anything that I would have in my home. They are good if you sit in the sweet spot, but even a high end unit's picutre quality falls off when you move around the room. In general rear projection units are cheap. They have a big screen and a low price. You get what you pay for. If you want to stand in a circle with your friends and say "mine is biggest" than go with a rear projection.

In short. Go with what you watch most. If you watch TV get a square shaped screen. If you watch widescreen buy a widescreen. I put my money on a high quality direct view CRT and I love it.
 
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Old 09-08-04, 08:13 PM
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No bias here???

But, if you have an HD signal, be it pig cable or a dish, you'll watch more HD widescreen - I guarantee it! And those that have it beg for more.
Thus if you want HD you should buy a 16:9 format vs 4:3

The 9.95 I pay for Dishnet HD is well worth it.
And I also watch OTA HD for most sports events on the weekend.
The li'l bit of old 4:3 garbage I watch is simply changed to partial zoom with one button flick.
Widescreen is the only way to go these days.

fred
 
 

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