Buying television

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Old 01-23-05, 05:06 PM
Pitto
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Buying television

Oh, just in case I decide to give up on my sony. I could use some thoughts on plasma, LCD and DLP (think that is what the new stuff is) so that I have some knowledge. Only after I bought my CRT t.v. did I find out somethings that would have made me think twice about buying it. I understand that size does matter when it comes to plasma and LCD.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 10:17 AM
B
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Plasma is a flat panel only and very expensive. If you have money to burn - buy a plasma.
LCD and DLP in a rear projection are very good. There are advantages and disadvantages to each.
Google both and read for yourself.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:48 PM
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Plasma is the most susceptible to burn-in of the 3 and the "bulbs" have a fixed lifespan similar to a lightbulb, and when they go out the TV is basicly trash. I would focus on LCD and DLP.
 
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Old 02-13-05, 09:40 AM
StuLev
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Good TV Choices

I agree with the plasma thoughts. Plasma is great if you want a cool, thin TV for a wall, but it isn't great for general watching everyday as it is limited with it's lifespan. I am personally not crazy about the LCD units I've seen. The pictures don't look as good, especially with up-converted material. DLP and the new DILA units are nice. They are relatively thin and lightweight, but have nice pictures and are fairly affordable. Good luck!
 
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Old 02-17-05, 12:23 PM
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sbd
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Originally Posted by stereoguy
Plasma is the most susceptible to burn-in of the 3 and the "bulbs" have a fixed lifespan similar to a lightbulb, and when they go out the TV is basicly trash. I would focus on LCD and DLP.
Plasma TV's do not have "bulbs", they have phosphor gases. I own a Pioneer 50" Plasma TV and it has the most vibrant picture I have ever experienced. It was well worth the price and will last just as long as most other TV lifespan.

Here is the information about Plasma TV lifespan from:
www.plasmatvbuyingguide.com

From the consumer's perspective, though, the 30,000-hour figure should be comforting, since this is about how long CRTs last. Let's put all this in perspective: Assuming the average American household watches 4 to 6 hours of television per day, a plasma display will last between 13 and 20 years. If you think about it, that's quite a bit of bang for your buck.

Following here are some guidelines you should implement to ensure that you get the most out of your plasma display:

1. Keep your BRIGHTNESS and CONTRAST levels "normalized" to actual viewing conditions. Don't jack up your CONTRAST levels unnecessarily; this only dissipates phosphors faster. In brightly lit rooms, you will probably need to boost your CONTRAST settings. At night or in other dim circumstances, you should lower these settings to extend the life of your unit.

Note: Many high quality manufacturers now have added preset options to make this adjustment possible without even going into the menu settings.

2. Do not leave static images on your display for extended periods of time (i.e., 20 minutes or longer). This will prevent burn-in, which is a permanent after-image on your screen.

3. Turn your plasma TV off when it's not being viewed.

4. Keep your plasma television in a well-ventilated area, so it will not have to work so hard to cool itself. This is one way to ensure your plasma's cooling system will remain in tip-top shape for the life of your unit.

Hope this helps,

SBD
 
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Old 02-17-05, 12:26 PM
TGroom
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Just to clear up some mis-information. Most manufacturers state the lives of plasmas at 20,000 to 30,000 hours. I wouldn't call that "limited lifespan" by any stretch of the imagination. The bulb in a DLP or LCD set will burn out before a plasma will. 42" EDTV plasmas are around the $2000 mark.

Edit: Looks like someone beat me to it.
 
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Old 02-17-05, 03:56 PM
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The bulb in an LCD or DLP is for the rear projection models. Yes, they burn out in 2-4 years, but any h/o can replace it themselves.
If you look at stereoguy's post, bulb is in quotation marks. To me, that implies using bulb as an analogy, not that plasmas literally have bulbs. The gasses glow like a light bulb - and no I don't mean a filament bulb.
 
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