Receiver Question


  #1  
Old 03-31-05, 07:52 AM
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Receiver Question

I have a Sony Receiver about 6 yrs old. Not sure of the Watts but it was a fairly high end of the Receivers at the time.

This Receiver has an A and B switch.

I have had attached to the B Switch a 4 channel selector switch so I can play music in different areas of the house.

My Question: Is there any reason that I can't do the same thing on the A Switch on the receiver? And then set the receiver to A and B so that I would be sending this signal to two Selector Switches that each have 3 or 4 speakers attached.

I just want to be sure that I don't harm the Receiver.

Thanks for any information.

Harlan.
 
  #2  
Old 03-31-05, 09:35 AM
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The main thing to look for is what the minimum impedence the amplifier can drive. This is usually printed on the back of the receiver near where the speaker connections are. If not, it will definitely be in the manual. When you use the A and B speakers together, you parallel the speakers so the impedence is less than either set by itself. As long as the amp can drive that load, you shouldn't have any problems.

That is the true answer, in reality, if you never listen to the music at very loud levels, a good quality amp can probably drive even a very low impedence load without a problem, but you just have to be very careful the amp doesn't overheat and burn up the power supply from the extra current it needs to put out.
 
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Old 04-01-05, 02:16 PM
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Blizzard - I've never heard that about A and B selectors. Why would they be in parallel and not independant?
 
  #4  
Old 04-04-05, 05:11 AM
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That is the way all commercial stereo receivers are designed. A stereo amp only has two channels (a right amp and a left amp), so when you run four speakers (A+B) off the two channels, the speakers have to be in parallel since they share the same connections - same supply (postive connection) and same ground (negative connection) on each channel of the amp. If they were independent, there would have to be another set of left and right power amplifier sections at the very least and that would be cost prohibitive (especially for something that may never be used).
 
 

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