Plasma, DLP, LCD which one is best?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-25-06, 07:56 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 155
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Plasma, DLP, LCD which one is best?

Hey:
Need some help about the newest HDTV's out there.

I am looking for a new set, 50" and do not know which is best.. I hear "Plasma" burns in and is high in repair cost.. I want to mount it on th ewall in the family room, watch some sports but mostly regular TV an dhave HD available.
How about some basic thoughts and recomendations?
Thanks in advance for any help offered.
Take care
Dan
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-25-06, 08:08 PM
diyplank's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Williamsport
Posts: 732
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Well a lot of debate on the Plasma vs. LCD vs. DLP. When I bought my 42" DLP in Oct. 05, Plasma was not the way to go. I have read and heard some good things about Plasma recently. But if you wanna be safe, I would go LCD. The prices have dropped considerably and also you can't mount a DLP on the wall. I love my tv, I spent 3 hours at Circuit City deciding on what to buy. At the time LCD's at that time were around 2300 for a 40". I saw one the other day in a black friday sale 50" for 1400. That is 500 less than what I paid for my DLP. So your best bet is LCD. My opinion though. Good luck
 
  #3  
Old 11-26-06, 06:26 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 155
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the input.. Looks like Daddy is going shopping!
Take care

Dan
 
  #4  
Old 11-26-06, 08:08 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: United States
Posts: 2,535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK - first tell me which is better - coke or pepsi. Not really a choice - then which is better - Ford or Chevy?

Since you want to hang it on the wall, you are limited to plasma and lcd.

Each technology has its advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" for everybody. That's why all both are for sale and why sales are great for both.

Plasma has gotten better over the past few years. Flat panel technology is expensive to repair, period.

Visit 2 or 3 tv shops and view the choices. Make sure the clerk puts on an analog channel. Analog channels look horrible on some tvs.
 
  #5  
Old 11-26-06, 08:51 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,767
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
JMO, in that size range you might want to consider plasma.
 
  #6  
Old 11-26-06, 09:20 AM
HotxxxxxxxOKC's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 8,044
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
TV repair guys LOVE plasmas cause they make ALOT of money of them. I just had my projection repaired and asked him specifically about plasmas and reliablilty. He said plasmas are junk and the technology and manufacturing processes are not good yet. He said plasmas will work for about 3-4 yrs then you have to get it replaced which will cost in access of $800. He said LCD's are the way to go right now. Also, Mitsubishi is the best brand of TV to get since they are made in Atlanta and are more reliable.
 
  #7  
Old 11-29-06, 03:57 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 304
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You might try loking at two articles ,one from PCWORLD and the other from PC MAGAZINE. They give a little insight in to picking one
 
  #8  
Old 11-29-06, 11:33 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 70
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If budget is your primary concern go with DLP. You'll get a much bigger viewing area vs. price. The value option is big here if you have the 18-20in to spare to account for the footprint in thickness. Samsung DLP, JVC HD-ILA and Sony SXRD (HD-ILA and SXRD are not DLP but a similar tech called LCoS - Liquid Crystal on Silicon) are the cream of the crop here. For true value I'd go with the JVC HD-ILA or Samsung DLP. If picture quality is most important in this area, go with the Sony SXRD. The category term for all of these types is Micro-Display or RPTV (including the older CRT rear projection).

To pick between LCD and Plasma is a bit more difficult; many of the shortcomings of both flat-screen technologies have been resolved in the last 2 generations and the prices are very close (LCDs larger than 40" are still a tad more, you'll pay about the same for a 45 or 46 LCD as a 50 plasma).

Really the difference between these two flat panel technologies now is how dark your room is. Since plasma has a glass panel it will cause more reflections in a bright-moderately bright room. LCD has a matte panel that absorbs more of the reflections. For plasmas, Panasonic is a great buy. For large LCD's Sharp, Samsung and Sony are the leaders.

In my case I went LCD (Samsung LN-S4692D) because footprint was a consideration (vs. DLP) and our living room has several large windows (vs. plasma).

Now 720p vs. 1080p is a TOTALLY different subject. Cross that bridge once you've decided which technology you're going with.
 

Last edited by jganyard; 11-29-06 at 11:43 AM.
  #9  
Old 11-30-06, 06:47 AM
HotxxxxxxxOKC's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 8,044
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Only thing capable of running 1080P is BlueRay. Wanting to get 1080P at this point is useless. By the time 1080P is actually being used, the tv would have died (about 5 yrs).
 
  #10  
Old 12-01-06, 08:02 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 43
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smile Two Types of LCD

Not to confuse things even further, but there are 2 basic technologies for LCD. One is flat-panel and the other is rear-projection. The flat-panel type is as it sounds...flat and similar to plasma. The price difference between the Flat-panel LCD and Plasma can be a little or a lot. For a bigger TV, I'd probably go with Plasma here.

The rear-projection LCD is most comparable to DLP in size and feel. They are usually much thinner than "Tube-style" TV's, but larger than flat-panels and plasmas. The thickness is usually about 14" at the bottom and 6" at the top. So they are still reasonably light and "movable". My 42" Sony Grand Wega LCD is 45lbs. I believe the 50" version is only about 60lbs. I am partial to these TV's because the cost is much more reasonable, the quality is, IMO, as good as anything out there. In some cases, these TV's are even mountable, though not quite as easily. It took me over a year to pull the trigger on my Sony and I've had it for a year. If I had it to do all over again, I'd have gotten the exact same TV, just the 50" one instead of the 42". The beauty of the DLP and Rear-projection LCD, is that they are reasonably inexpensive to fix. You get x # of hours of bulb life (approx 3-4 years) and then you can simply replace the bulb for a few hundred bucks and it is like you have a brand new TV again. The bulb slides out like a cartridge and can be replaced yourself.

Just my two cents. Good luck!
 
  #11  
Old 12-02-06, 08:59 PM
diyplank's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Williamsport
Posts: 732
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I have a DLP Samsung, when I bought the 4 yr warranty, the sales guy told me that even though the bulb may not be burnt up before my 4 warr. expires to say it is starting to and bring it in b4 the warr expires. They are right now around 300 bucks which still is way better than buying a plasma for the price and then buying a new one in 5 yrs or so when your first one dies.
 
  #12  
Old 12-12-06, 06:26 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've seen many people here say that plasma tv's will not last. Has anyone making these statements experienced this? I'm not a tv-tech guru but I do know this, i've had both LCD and plasma. My most recent purchase is a plasma. In my experience the HD picture quality is far superior with my plasma tv. Yes it's not true 1080p but you can't find anything broadcast in 1080p in this day and age. The only thing that gives you true 1080p is BlueRay or HD DVD. Yes there's some glare but there's going to be glare with any tv, and yes I did have glare with my LCD tv. If you're going to get a large flat panel, plasma is definitely the way to go. Yes it's more expensive but the picture quality is by far superior. I've visited many websites and i've come to a conclusion that Pioneer makes the best plasma (specifically the Elite model). For all those that think the plasma will "die" in a few years I say...If you're going to spend thousands on a large screen flat panel then invest in the 5 year extended warranty so you don't have to worry about those costly repairs if it does break down. That's just my 2 cents. Best of luck with your search.
 
  #13  
Old 12-15-06, 12:14 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Talking Ah, the choices...

I remember not too long ago that TVs were easy to shop for. Those days are obviously over.

I think that going forward, HDTVs will be judged on longevity and maintenance and not so much picture quality. Tube televisions can last 10, 15, 20 years. None of the new HDTV TVS are projected to last for more than 3-5 years before something goes bad and will need to be fixed. Pretty annoying when you are shelling out thousands to begin with.

I just bought my first HDTV and got a great deal. An RCA 50" HDTV DLP 720P rear projection microdisplay. Sure, sounds basic and for the most part, it is. However, I have to tell you that the picture quality is incredible...at 9 feet, as it should be. I will address my attention to the distance reference later. In addition, to address the previous post, one of the main reasons why I did buy this TV was the matte screen as there is no glare. There is nothing more annoying than being able to see a reflection of anything on an HDTV. Matte is the way to go...

Here is my 2 cents on 1080p - 1080p units are pretty incredible. However, unless your a gamer (PS3) or heavy DVD watcher (Blu-Ray and HD-DVD), its not worth it yet. Don't expect 1080P broadcast for quite some time because of the increased bandwith. Also, by default, higher definition is more noticable the closer you get to the TV and who really wants to watch a 65" screen at 4-5 feet? If you look at a 1080p next to a 720p from 10 feet, although there is a slight difference, its not something that would create the "WOW!" yet. Get at 4-5 feet, the difference becomes more apparant but, again, too close for me.
 
  #14  
Old 12-16-06, 05:22 AM
Pendragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,852
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
What about the classic rear projection? Yes, it's a larger footprint, but the picture quality on a properly adjusted set rivals plasma and LCD, but without the shortcomings of either. No backlight to burn out, no refresh rate concerns (important for sports fans), no pixels to die.

Best of all, they are still cheaper.

The 65" Mitsubishi I bought 2 years ago was about $2700. Yes, it's a large TV, but it's in a large room, so who cares? Slap a bookcase or media center on each side and it will look right in place.

Sets with matte screens trade glare for picture clarity, the difference is like looking through a foggy window.
 
  #15  
Old 12-18-06, 08:02 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northport, NY
Posts: 92
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smile I have to comment here!!

It bothers me to constantly read about how bad Plasma technology is. How it WILL burn, break down, need refilling etc etc etc.

Plasma offers the BEST picture quality out there today bar none. They have a stated HALF life on 60000 hrs. That is until they lose half their brightness.....60 THOUSAND hours!
They are extremely reliable as My Panasonic is a 6th generation and is 5 years old. The only other technology that compares in picture quality is a CRT Television. LCD, DLP, Rear Projection of all kinds have some strengths but they cannot deliver the type of picture a Plasma will. Rich colors, vibrant detail, and deep blacks.

LCD's offer an alternative but cannot produce the same detail (often the picture looks soft) and LCD simply cannot produce the blacks required for a picture to "jump" out at you. Contrary to popular belief , LCD's do and will retain an image as proven repeatedly by anyone using one as a security monitor. A few years back, Dell had a big recall on their laptops because oif this.

Now, Yes, there are a few drawbacks to Plasma technology, burn in being the biggest.
Very early plasma displays were EXTREMELY susceptible to burn in. That has rapidly changed. Today, a plasma television is as susceptible as your ordinary CRT television AFTER the first 200 hours. Let me explain, a Plasma Phosphor (ths is what makes up the reg green or blue in a Plasma) is a small gas cell. When that phosper is new it acts slightly erratic and needs to "age" to burn evenly. Once it ages, it becomes less erratic and there is a less chance of uneven wear. It takes roughly 200 hours to have a Plasma panel burn evenly. During this time, I recomend that all Plasma owners simply lower their Contrast and Brightness settings just to ensure even phospher wear. When a bunch of phosphers burns unevenly (usually from static image being displayed for a length of time) you get "Burn In".

Is it necessary to do this? Most manufacturers today tell you to use caution the first 100 hours, I say 200, regardless I would say yes please take caution for the first 100-200 hours. Turn on all manufacturer installed "burn-in" prevention mechanisms and lower your settings.

As I stated earlier, I have had my Plasma for 5 years. I have been gaming on it since I originally bought it. I watch DVDs and television with 4:3 format images and NEVER experienced any type Burn-in. I have used and installed hundreds of LCD's and Plasmas alike. I have worked with both Sharp and LG on major projects (Hotel Installations). Plasma is a terrific technology. It's sad to hear all the BS floating around about it although more and more, people are becoming more aware of its benefits and all the falicies are starting to die down. If you buy a Plasma, follow the simple steps laid out above and you will be EXTREMELY happy.........thats is until SED's or LASER TV's start coming out!!!!
 
  #16  
Old 12-28-06, 05:30 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: North Texas
Posts: 2,345
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Love my Sony

Just bought a high end 46 inch Sony flat screen LCD 1080P and I love it No reflection problems even with a large window in the back. I also got a Sony DVD with progressive scan and upconverts to 1080 hooked it up with a HDMI cable and I am glued to the TV.
When you watch a show like disscovery HD and see every little hair on the seals face you got to marvel at how far technolagy as come.
LCD is lighter if you want to hang it on the wall (mine is not). LCD screens become a little warm (not real bad) but you will notice as you walk by.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: