Best connections

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Old 01-23-07, 12:48 PM
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Best connections

I have a basic cable set up with a Sony 46 inch TV (see page 12 of the PDF for inputs) and I bought a Sony DVP-NC85H and a Onkyo HT-S790. After going over all three manuals I'm a little overwelmed with info and would like some professionals to help guide me with my set up. The TV and DVD player have HDMI and all three (TV, DVD and stereo) have component video inputs. I would like to know the best set up that will produce the best picture and sound. Any advice is greatly appreciated!! http://www.docs.sony.com/release/KP46WT520.pdf

Thanks in advance,

Flanders
 
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Old 01-23-07, 01:18 PM
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HDMI will give you the best picture. But, component cables will work fine for most anything you will watch. The jump from Composite (yellow) or S-Video to Component is a big one. The jump from Component to HDMI is not quite so drastic. This is all assuming you are watching something in HD. You may see very little difference in programming that is analog or just plain Digital Cable.

As for sound, HDMI also does well with sound, but you'd need to go through your receiver with it if you want surround sound. You'll get great digital sound quality with the digital optical cable or coaxial audio cable (not to be confused with coax cable). If you use stereo sound (red/white), you will get standard sound that will be nothing special.

Again, it all depends what your watching.

Good luck!
 
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Old 01-25-07, 12:59 PM
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Actually you would almost certainly not see any difference between HDMI and component video, but HDMI has the advantage of being a single cable solution, and there is another reason why you need to use HDMI as I will explain. To get surround sound, as slacey99 says, you need the sound to be processed by your home theater receiver.
The Onkyo does component video switching but not HDMI. And your DVD player will only upconvert to 1080i if you use HDMI, so you should not use component connections.
So logically you should connect the Sony DVD directly to the TV using HDMI, and also connect it via a optical audio cable to your Onkyo. Then just make sure your TV speakers are switched off; you should get a great picture using the direct HDMI connection and excellent sound using the optical audio cable thru your Onkyo.
Don't pay a lot for cables. The only difference between a $100 HDMI cable and a $15 HDMI cable is $85 less in your wallet. Try monoprice.com or bluejeanscable for great HDMI cables at great prices, with very fast delivery.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 02:37 PM
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Don't pay a lot for cables. The only difference between a $100 HDMI cable and a $15 HDMI cable is $85 less in your wallet. Try monoprice.com or bluejeanscable for great HDMI cables at great prices, with very fast delivery.

Thanks for the tip on the HDMI cables, does the same go for optical cables? Monster costs an arm and a leg. One more thing, are composite cables the same as RCA cables?
 
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Old 02-04-07, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Flanders View Post
Don't pay a lot for cables. The only difference between a $100 HDMI cable and a $15 HDMI cable is $85 less in your wallet. Try monoprice.com or bluejeanscable for great HDMI cables at great prices, with very fast delivery.

Thanks for the tip on the HDMI cables, does the same go for optical cables? Monster costs an arm and a leg. One more thing, are composite cables the same as RCA cables?
That's an overly broad statement. that's like saying a car is a car, any car will get you from point A to Point B. But a Cadillac is not a Yugo. The higher end/ higher priced cables have higher quality copper, or silver wire. more sheilding and better construction connections. with HDMI the signal either gets there or it doesn't so you won't notice a visible picture if you get one, BUT most HDMI outputs on cable boxes are extremely low signal, just enough to meet standards (which are always changing) so your cables under 6' should be ok, but over that and you might start running into problems. Signal loss due to wire resistance causes a choppy signal, studdery audio, or complete loss of signal. I agree Monster Cables are overpriced Radio Shack Cables. But like most things, you get what you pay for. Cheap cables are that, Cheap.
 
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