RG59 or RG6

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  #1  
Old 11-20-10, 06:51 PM
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RG59 or RG6

Verizon recently installed FIOS TV and internet in our home. The wire that runs from outside to inside and into our computer is a white wire with these markings on it:

az3914202 9900963 f677tsuv cm c(etl)us dr catv (ft)us 18 awg

I'm simply trying to determine if it's RG59 or RG6. From what I've read, RG6 is thicker than RG6, but the RG6 Coax Cable I just bought from Home Depot is thinner than the white wire Verizon installed. I can't imagine it's anything other than RG59 or RG6.

Is there any other way I can determine what kind of wire they installed? Speaking of which - it seems everyone has this question. Why don't wire manufacturers simply list this information on the wire?

Thanks for any help.
 
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Old 11-20-10, 07:52 PM
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the 18 awg, or 18 guage wire can mean a number of things. I would figure from my experience, if the line that they ran is larger in diameter than the RG6 that you purchased, could very possibly be an RG6 quad shield, which is the same guage as an RG6, but instead, it has 2 layers of foil, and shielding, this would be quite possibly the reason in which it is larger than the RG6 that you bought. Secondly, RG59, is actually SMALLER in diameter than RG6 is. I hope this helps you.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 05:48 AM
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Cheinemann is correct. That cable is RG6/u Quad shield. The stuff you bought from HD is also 18 awg, but has dual shield (1 foil + 1 braid), making it thinner.

RG6 = 18awg. RG59 = 20awg. You can also tell by the diameter of the dielectric (white center conductor insulation): An RG59 F connector won't fit on an RG6 cable, and an RG6 F connector will fit loosely (too loose) on RG59. For the record, almost no one uses RG59 anymore except for very short jumps between devices.

The markings on the cable are the manufacturer's code and cable type. That cryptic system is generally used when installers buy 10's of thousands of feet in bulk. I'll bet the stuff you bought at HD has more traditional markings.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 09:56 PM
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They could have run RG8 (18ga) cable. That's what comcrap ran from pole to my house.

fred
 
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Old 11-22-10, 04:54 AM
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RG8 (and RG58) is used for radio and mostly obsolete ThinNet. It has a 50 ohm impedance which makes it incompatible with CATV's 75 ohm system.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 05:26 AM
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9 times outta 10, Verizon installs RG6 quad shield in there installations. Rick, actually RG59 is still used as the primary wire type for CCTV intalls.
 
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Old 11-23-10, 05:19 AM
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True, but I was talking about home installation. Also the RG59 (I always spec RG6) used in CCTV has a solid copper center conductor, not copper-clad steel.
 
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