Direct TV old models with new system single line system.

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Old 03-11-11, 02:23 PM
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Direct TV old models with new system single line system.

I just recently upgraded to HD Direct TV and got all new equipment, but I still have the old stuff as well sitting in boxes. Direct TV says the old stuff can't be used with the new system - but is that really true? The old equipment is about 7 years old and the DVR's need two inputs to work properly while the new ones only need one. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 03-12-11, 10:28 AM
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Well, they need access cards to operate, so I doubt they will be of any use/value.
 
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Old 03-23-11, 03:53 AM
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Originally Posted by the_tow_guy View Post
Well, they need access cards to operate, so I doubt they will be of any use/value.
It's his old equipment, so he obviously has the cards for them.. The new equipment comes with new cards. You have never moved old cards to new equipment during an upgrade.

That said, it depends on what the actual equipment is. As it stands now, no. You can't hook the old boxes to the new dish. The new dish uses a brand new communication system called SWiM (Single Wire Multiswitch - allows up to 8 separate tuners off a single cable from the dish), which is incompatible with the old boxes. There is an adapter available, which gives you 'legacy' outputs for older devices. However, the other problem is that most of the older equipment is not capable of decoding MPEG-4, which is what the newer channels are being switched over to. The old MPEG-2 equipment will just display blank screens on an MPEG-4 channel.

If you tell us the exact brand and model numbers of your receivers, we can tell you if they are compatible. But one other thing to consider, is that the adapter costs about $130, and gives you three legacy outputs (two of which would be used for the DVR).
 
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Old 03-23-11, 05:28 AM
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I misspoke; I didn't mean there were no cards installed, but rather cards that would work, i.e. be recognized. Would the system still recognize the codes from the old cards? When we had Direct (now have Dish), I once had to replace a card that they said had expired.
 
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Old 03-23-11, 05:56 AM
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Ya, I used to have DIRECTV. I remember having to replace the card once or twice and when I had to replace the receiver, I had to take the card out of the old box and insert it into the new one.
 
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Old 03-26-11, 02:05 PM
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The cards themselves don't 'expire' per se. They only change the cards when their encryption system has been publicly compromised. The system they put into place about 8 years ago is still unhackable, thus the receivers are still shipping with those cards, and any card that was active recently is still 'activatable'.

When they do need to change cards, basically what they do is introduce a new encryption stream for the new cards simulcast with the old one, send out new cards to all legitimate subscribers (with a warning that their old cards will cease to work), give a one or two month grace period to swap them, then they turn off the encryption stream for the old cards, rendering them useless.

The way their access system works, you CAN'T swap a card into a new receiver. The new receiver always comes with a new card. When you insert the new card into the receiver for the first time, the receiver permanently 'burns' it with its receiver ID. From that point on, the card will ONLY work in that receiver. This ensures that you can't take your card over to your buddy's house to watch the game. It also ensures that if you steal a card from a receiver at Hooters or Best Buy it won't work in your receiver. You will only get an "Incorrect Access Card" message.
 
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