Connecting Speakers

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Old 03-08-12, 02:30 PM
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Connecting Speakers

I have a Philips Hi-Def TV that does not have a connection for speakers when using HDMI Cable services. It only has a SPDIF Out (DIGITAL) ConnectionI .

I currently have a small speaker connected through the Headphone connection that works fine with one exception: The mute control does not turn off the Headphone connection speaker, only the TV mounted ones.

What is the possibility of removing the back of the TV and connecting directly to the speakers? I don't want to take back off without some idea what might happen when I do.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 02:53 PM
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Could you give the model # of your TV?

I assume you are trying to get better sound?

Why dont you use the digital out and connect through a sound system? Or they have sound bars that willl connect to that output.

Connecting to the internal speaker will change the impeadance. Not sure of the implications but the sound board will try to drive the additional speakers. Funny things can happen with todays electronics. Components dont have the tolerences they used to.

Just my opinion.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 03-08-12, 03:05 PM
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Its a Philips Model 47PLF5704D TV.

I have been using the small powered computer speaker for about 6 months.

It does what I need and it only cost $7.00. I have explored the other possibilities and don't need Stereo Speakers or a bar as I'm not concerned about music, etc., only sound.

I have bad hearing and I just need to bring up the volume by my chair without disturbing everyone else in the room. I filed the end of the male connector down so that it doesn't turn off the TV speakers when you plug it in as Headphones usually do.

Thanks for your interest.
 
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Old 03-09-12, 04:41 AM
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-- Can you take the audio feed off the cable box? (You may need a male RCA to female 3.5mm so you can plug in the computer speaker.) Because the speaker is powered you don't need a speaker output -- you can use a line-level output.

-- Does the computer speaker have a volume control that you could use to mute it?

-- Can you use a headphone extension cable and just unplug it from the extension when you need to mute it?
 
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Old 03-09-12, 08:40 AM
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The speaker has both a volume control and an on/off switch. Its just a hassle to mute TV and then power off the speaker too.

The Cable remote control is programmed to control TV volume not cable box volume. Yes, I can change, but then the volume control wouldn't work for DVD player since the cable box is bypassed.

Wiring directly to speakers on TV seems to best approach, but don't know complications when I take back off TV.
 
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Old 03-09-12, 11:49 PM
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Since you're using powered speakers you should be able to safely splice your speaker's wiring into the TV's speakers. It's not recommended because of the hassle and possibility of causing incidental damage when you open the case. Then again, this is a DIY site, so I would do the same thing to save the cost of an outboard remote-controlled volume box and a universal remote.

The impedance shouldn't affect the TV speakers because line level signals (typical of powered speakers) are usually thousands of ohms. Internal TV speakers and home stereo speakers are usually between 4 and 16 ohms.
 
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Old 03-10-12, 07:41 AM
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Thanks, Rick. I think I will try it as soon as I have a lot of peace and quiet Scares me to remove back of TV, but I'm a tinkerer.
 
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Old 04-03-12, 09:26 AM
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Connecting speakers

I’d like to chime in here, not with answers, but with a similar type of problem. I own a year old LG 47 LD520 wide screen. It has a pair of 10 Watt built-in speakers. It also provides a Head Phone Jack and an “Optical Digital Audio Out” which is supposed to connect to “digital audio input” of audio equipment. (Like sound bar I guess?)

I am older and have a hard time understanding conversations on many TV programs. Turning up the volume doesn’t really help. It’s the quality of the enunciation or of the program recording that seems to matter. To double check I watched the show “Missing” on TV and followed up on my computer which has 90 Watt speakers. I could barely understand some of the conversations, but better than the TV. Programs such as news and talk shows are easy to understand, unless they have a guest with a heavy accent. Is this at all similar to what you are experiencing?

I’m thinking about taking the Head Phone outputs, amplify, and input to HiFi stereo speakers without losing quality. I am also wondering if you can give me info on the $7 speaker(s) you got. Brand name, model, and where you purchased?

I am also leery of taking the back cover off. Just maneuvering the big box around is scary. And adding an expensive sound bar to lowest priced wide screen doesn’t make sense to me.

Thanks, Ray and anyone who would like to respond. All appreciated.
 
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Old 04-03-12, 09:59 AM
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They're real cheapos, about $7.00. Purchased from Big Lots. Kinyon Brand, Model PA 115b, 2W Amplified, 9v150mA Power Source.

Still haven't garnered enough moxey to take back off of TV.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 03:58 AM
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Go into the audio menu and turn off surround mode. Turn on the Auto Volume Leveler and set it to the highest setting.

The dialogue in drama shows and movies is handled differently than the talk shows. The sound track in a movie makes use of dynamic range to help convey the storyline. This means the softer sounds are softer, and the louder sounds are louder. This causes the level of the dialogue to vary.

By contrast, talk shows are heavily compressed with little or no dynamic range to raise the overall level and keep it at its loudest. Commercials are even more compressed, and I'll bet you have little problem hearing the announcers in a commercial.

As we get older we lose the ability to hear certain frequencies. Unfortunately the first to go are usually those where our ears are most sensitive, and they happen to be in the range where the human voice annunciates consonants and sibilants. Fortunately the brain can compensate to a certain extent.

Unfortunately the problem then shifts from not hearing certain frequencies to not being able to localize sounds that contain those frequencies. The reflections from the walls, mirrors and other hard surfaces in a typical living room can cause confusion about where the sound is coming from. Loss of articulation is one result, and that means it's difficult to understand dialogue.

In the pro sound business we have devices called "assistive listening systems" which are nothing more than wireless ear buds or headphones that carry the same program material as the house speakers. Their purpose is to remove the room reflections (and therefore the localization confusion) from the equation.

Bringing the source of the sound closer to your ears, either by using headphones or satellite speakers placed close to your seat, will accomplish the same goal. If there is no one else in the room who needs to hear the TV sound, use the headphone output.

You can also buy a Toslink to RCA audio converter and powered speakers, or connect the converter to a separate amp to drive the headphones.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 12:15 PM
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Connecting Speakers

Rick, thanks for your inputs. I will try these adjustments out. I looked at the menus before and tried a few things with no luck.

Ray, I am wondering if you noticed any loss of quality of speech using the head phone jacks on TV to drive the external speakers? I have a set of pretty good quality speakers used with my computer which I could switch out for lower cost models since I hardly ever watch a program on the computer.
 
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Old 04-05-12, 09:23 AM
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007, quality is not "stereo". However, that said it serves my purpose quite well. I have same trouble you do, difficulty understanding words. Volume might otherwise be OK, but just can't understand what they're saying. Getting it closer to my ear helps a lot.

Remember, I had to carefully file down tip of jack to prevent it from turning off internal speakers and remember the remote controle mute function does not mute the headphone speakers (a hassle and why I want to connect directly). A cheap set of powered computer speakers, with volume control, is what these are.
 
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Old 04-15-12, 07:12 AM
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The built in speakers for TV sets continue to be of poor quality on average. But I would not take the back off the TV to make additional speaker connections. Often enough just getting the back off is an ordeal and small plastic tabs could be broken in the process if you don't have precise instructions on how to do it. And also there may be metal shields that have to be undone as well. It's easy to squash a wire or slash your fingers when dealing with these metal shields.

My suggestion is to continue using the headphone jack, but feeding two sound systems, one for your chair side speaker and the other for everyone else in the room. Hopefully both systems much better than the TV built in speakers.

<<I am older and have a hard time understanding conversations on many TV programs.>>

When I was in grade school we had French lessons on TV. (This was before most folks got color let alone HD or LCD.) The speaker audio on that TV set was so bad that things like "Repetez" came out with the R sounding like an L.
 
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Old 04-27-12, 10:19 AM
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Connecting speakers

I looked at the settings again on the TV audio menus and believe they are the best I can get.

I took my quality speakers (but 15-20 years old) from the computer and plugged into headphone output jack(3.5mm) in a fashion you had done, Ray. I replayed a program that I had watched with TV built-in speakers. Much better quality of speech, but I was surprised that volume had to be set fairly high, like 75% on the speaker amplifier. When I play anything on my hi-wattage stereo set, the volume is about 1/10 of max. However, now I’m pretty sure there is a quality audio signal inside the TV and the manufacturer just saved a few bucks by installing cheap speakers. Still not ready to pull off back cover!! Have you done it, Ray?
 
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Old 01-10-13, 12:04 PM
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Connecting Speakers

I finally have a solution that appears to work pretty well at low cost and low power. After much pain, I final got a LG NB2020A SoundBar at Frys for only $60. Best Buy also had it later on close out for $50. It was a good match for my late model wide screen, Optical Digital input with provided cable, consumes only 11 W, and has auto turn off/on controlled by audio signal input. So I never fiddle with it. The TV Mute control doesn’t kill the sound, so I had turn the volume all the way down on TV because the TV speaker outputs aren’t sync’d with the SoundBar output. The sound out is 40 W which is about as much as the TV, but the quality is much better. Includes woofers and tweeters. However, only the digital optical input, so would not work with older TVs.
 
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