How many splitters for 1 cable modem + 3 TVs

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Old 01-05-13, 10:35 PM
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How many splitters for 1 cable modem + 3 TVs

I am rewiring my home and I'm not really sure how I should split the cable signal. I was going to go with a 4 way splitter because I have 4 devices consisting of 1 cable modem and 3 TVs, but I've heard that the cable modem should get like 50% of the signal.

Is there a good way to go about splitting the signal? How many cable splitters should I use?
 
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Old 01-06-13, 12:58 AM
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Based on your wiring......you can run a two way splitter with one port going to the modem and the other port feeding a three way splitter.

Or you can simply run a four port splitter. (my choice)

Remember these must be splitters good up to 1 Ghz and dual direction
 
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Old 01-06-13, 01:40 AM
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I was told by the cable guy the modem must be split first on the line as soon as it comes into the home for max single to the modem. From there you can split what you what.
 
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Old 01-06-13, 02:11 AM
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I spent a little time working as a cable guy, and best practices were to put a two way splitter in with the cable modem on one leg and a second 2, 3 or 4 way spliter on the other for the televisions (as mentioned above).

If all you have is a four split there's no harm in trying it that way, the worst that happens is that the cable modem doesn't sync up right, or you get intermittant drops in connectivity (and then you know you need to change it to the other configuration).

Don't go cheap on the splitters though, you don't have to buy gold plated stuff but the dollar store stuff is genuine junk.
 
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Old 01-06-13, 03:39 PM
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Great advice. I think I might go with a 2-way splitter and put the modem on one leg and then the other leg run a 3-way splitter for the 3 TVs in the house.

I'm just concerned about any signal losses. What about using an amplifier? Do you think I should get an amplifier? Would I put it before the 1st splitter or the 2nd splitter?
 
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Old 01-06-13, 03:46 PM
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Amp??? After the modem splitter I have mine split 5 times after that. Never a issue with signal on the TVs that I ever had.
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 01-07-13 at 05:25 AM.
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Old 01-06-13, 03:55 PM
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I was wondering where all my signal was going
 
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Old 01-07-13, 03:36 AM
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You should have PLENTY of signal to feed three TVs and a cable modem. Again it's impossible to be more specific without knowing the signal strength at the CSE, but generally a two split will take 3.5db from the signal and a three split will take 3.5db, 7db and 7db so your loss at the cable modem is 3.5db, and at the TVs it's 7db, 10.5db an 10.5db - as long as you're getting a pretty standard strength signal from your cable co you should be fine.

If you are experiencing reception problems you can install a drop amp on the television leg of the 2 split (it's a simple inline device available on ebay for cheap - but depending on age might not function well with newer digital devices PVRs and Digital Cable boxes and cable modems etc), but a drop amp is considered a temporary fix and is meant to bridge the gap to keep the customer on service while the signal is increased on the cable companies side (usually by running a second drop or line in to the customer to avoid that first splitter).

If you're getting enough signal to use the cable modem, then the TVs (which require far less signal) should be fine. Just be conscious that you're starting with a finite value for signal strength and that each splitter subtracts some from that value (as does the length of the cable runs, F81s and so forth).
 
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Old 01-07-13, 05:47 AM
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I always use the two way splitter with one leg going to the modem and the other leg into the splitter for the TVs. When cable was originally hooked up to my house, it was just one big splitter and I did not have enough signal strength at the modem.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 05:57 AM
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I would split the incoming feed for (1) the modem, and (2) everything else.

For the record, they make two different types of 3-way splitters: Balanced and unbalanced. An unbalanced splitter will have two ports at -7dB loss and one at -3.5. This is because internally it splits the signal in two, then splits one of the splits. A balanced 3-way is a true 3-way splitter that has an equal loss across all three ports: -5.5dB.

Also for the record, an amp can be added to increase signal but the real purpose of an amplifier is to make up insertion loss and cable attenuation. In this case you'd be looking to make up around 10 or 11 dB of loss, so an inline 11dB amp would work like a champ on the TV side only.
(It's not a good idea to insert an amp in the modem's path.) They're available at the local RS.
 
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