Re-locate a Dish receiver?

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Old 03-04-14, 10:06 AM
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Re-locate a Dish receiver?

I think the installer took the path of least resistance when he installed my Dish satellite receiver a few years back.

I have a Rhododendron that will soon be crowding the receiver. How hard would it be to move the dish myself? Obviously taking the exact alignment angles into consideration...
 
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Old 03-04-14, 11:49 AM
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I used to have DIRECTV and installed the dish myself - it's not that difficult BUT doesn't Dish own your equipment? I suspect you need to contact them first.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 12:25 PM
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We have Dish, which I moved about 5 years ago, and it works fine. Can't recall the particulars, but remember that the way they originally set it up did not match the supposed location of their satellite(s), and using that information did not work for me either, so I oriented it the same as what they had, using a compass and level.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 01:44 PM
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Do you want to move the receiver or the dish? You mention receiver a couple times but then also ask about moving the dish. Both the dish and the receiver can be moved.

Dish & Direct are in such competition that they would probably have a tech come out for free to relocate your receiver or dish to keep you as a customer. If you want to do it yourself either is not a bad job. How far you want to move will partially determine how difficult it will be. Quite often installers leave some extra slack in the cables if it passes through your crawl space. You might be able to gently pull on the cable and get extra slack to move the receiver or dish where needed.
 

Last edited by Pilot Dane; 03-04-14 at 04:02 PM.
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Old 03-04-14, 06:02 PM
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Before you move it..... make sure you have a clear shot to the southwest sky. Sometimes the installers have a tricky time placing the dish as there may not be a clear shot to the satellite.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 04:27 AM
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I would echo PD's comment. I would be pretty surprised if Dish wouldn't relocate it for free; we've been very pleased with their customer service.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 09:53 AM
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Dish and Directv both charge for service calls unless you have their maintenance plans. I've had both services over the years and in my experience Directv seems to be the one that will go the extra mile for the customer, while Dish left me swinging in the wind more than once.

That said.. How far do you need to move it? Are you talking about moving it farther up or a different spot on the same wall? Or to a different place altogether? If it will be on the same wall (and that wall doesn't have an irregular surface like siding or weird angles), then you can simply measure the mast for plumb (you have to make sure it is plumb to start), unbolt the mounting foot from the old surface then reinstall it in the new spot, making sure it remains plumb.

There are three settings on the dish. All are set on the dish itself once the mast is leveled/plumbed.. Azimuth (compass direction), elevation (angle), and skew (how it's cocked right or left relative to level).. If the old and new foot mounting surfaces are exactly parallel (as in two different spots on the same wall), then the elevation and azimuth won't change by default. You just have to make sure the mast is plumb (or in the exact same position as it was) to preserve the skew setting.

If you need to move it to a different surface altogether (as in wall to roof or a different side of the house), then all bets are off. The mast needs to be plumbed then the dish re-aimed. It doesn't take a brain surgeon, but if you don't have a Bird Dog (satellite finder), then you'll be making a hundred trips up and down the ladder to check the signal level.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 09:56 AM
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I actually want to move it closer to the house - so cable length isn't an issue. I plan to put a new 4X4 into the ground and move the dish from where the dude mounted it on my deck.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:10 PM
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dish install

As someone said , put the 4x4 plumb back to front and side to side , high enough so when mowing etc , so the dish signal isn't interrupted.The elevation and rotation should be close to the same. The compass bearing can be determined sometimes from your receiver , if you enter you zip code.
Or get a compass and go behind the dish a few feet away and at a line of sight a right angle with the face of the dish measure the degrees.
Or put a stake in the yard at a line of sight straight to the dish .
I would suggest put the 4x4 in cement ,so it won't move when adjusting or when the wind blows.
Got to the options -signal strength menu , to fine tune.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:23 PM
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alignment

Was just searching your compass bearing .Check dish pointer .com , once you know your satellite , it probably says on you signal strength screen , enter you zip and it tells you elevation, bearing and skew.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 11:43 PM
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Satellite TV

I used to work installing both Dish Network and DirecTV. Dish Network is bad about charging for everything if a technician goes out there. DirecTV says that they will charge, but if you put up a little bit of a fuss (and they told us that in the Shop where I worked in Phoenix with 120 other techs) then they will waive the fee.

So first I would see if Dish will come out and do it for you because now you are receiving signal from 2-3 different satellites, depending on what package you have. If you have HD, it is going to be even more satellites you will be receiving your channels from, so the dishes are getting harder and harder to point. I installed quite a few DirecTV HD dishes at the end of my work as a tech, and they had 5 satellites they were pulling from. I don't think Dish is getting their channels from that many, but it is more than it used to be.

The whole point I am trying to make is that it isn't as easy as it used to be to repoint the dish. So I would first try to get Dish to send someone out to do it before I tried it unless you are experienced in doing so. One thing that I found out when installing Satellite Tv is a lot of times if Dish Or DirecTV wants to charge you to do something like that, you can threaten them with changing to the other company and many times they would give in so you didn't change. I don't know if it is the same now though, it has been about 2 years since I was working with them.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 03:52 AM
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... I love "insider" information. Thanks
 
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Old 03-06-14, 04:03 AM
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Perhaps the service call $ (and maybe the level of service) is flexible - pretty sure the installers/servicers are essentially sub-contractors - I've had Dish out a couple of times with no service charge. Recently upgraded to the Hopper and no charge for the upgrade install which included replacing the dish.

As to the pole, I think I would opt for a galvanized steel pole in cement. Problem with the 4x4 is you run the risk of it warping/twisting which could affect the azimuth/elevation.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 11:24 AM
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Yeah they didn't charge you for the trip to install the hopper because that upgrade locked you in for another 2 years and the free install and new hopper-compatible dish was part of the deal.

If the call is for a legit repair, like your receiver stopped working or the LNB on the dish failed, then yeah you can sometimes talk them into waiving the trip charge. But for a voluntary dish move when you still have line of sight and the issue is a growing bush on your property that *might* eventually block the signal? No. That they WILL charge you for. If you argue they will tell you to prune the bush if you are concerned about it.

And yes, mounting it on a 4x4 is a bad idea. You will need to sink a 1 1/2" pipe into the ground. Make sure you drill a hole and stick a long bolt (5-6") through the bottom before you pour the cement so that the pole can't rotate.

Also keep in mind, with the mini-dishes the signal comes into the dish at a REALLY high angle. It's not the same angle that the LNB arm is sticking out. I've seen them installed six feet away from the north side of a single story house - and it looks like there is no way it's getting a signal, but they do.
 

Last edited by JerseyMatt; 03-06-14 at 11:42 AM.
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