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  #1  
Old 04-04-14, 10:20 AM
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Question Sticky Perhaps?

In this case it looks like the OP didn't realize that the front of the screen is actually part of the LCD screen and not a protective covering. No problem..... we learn something new every day.

Exactly! I was about to attack my VIZIO with windex and paper towels. Something made me think to look it up and was surprised how delicate these tvs are. I thought they were glass front like any other tv.

It might help if someone could write up the idiosyncrasies of these tvs and what not to do. I know I'll be much more careful throwing the tennis ball for my dog from now on.

Just a thought and a question:

Anyone know how these work in the cold like a garage in winter? Tube types work fine, not sure about these.
 
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Old 04-06-14, 06:45 AM
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LCD TVs are installed under the top level at the stadium in Buffalo, New York. Outdoors. They are encased in plexiglass to protect them from rain and snow.
 
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Old 04-06-14, 06:53 AM
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I know from shopping for these types of TVs, you often see some with price tags that are absolutely out of this world. They are designed to be used as store front displays, or put on patios in sports bars and are guaranteed for outdoor use.
 
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Old 04-07-14, 03:39 AM
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For LCDs that are installed in cold - but dry - places (such as a garage), you don't need to spend huge amounts of money on "outdoor" panels. However you DO need to make sure you buy one with an LED backlight. Standard LCDs use CCFL tubes that get very dim and uneven in cold environments.
 
  #5  
Old 04-07-14, 11:39 AM
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Outdoor TVs are crazy expensive, didn't even know they made such a thing.


....make sure you buy one with an LED backlight.

Good to know that! Makes searching much easier when you know what you're looking for.

Thanks guys
 
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Old 04-07-14, 08:03 PM
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The problem with using "non" outdoor TV's (both CFL and LED back light) is condensation. If a TV is not sealed every time you turn it on it heats up. Turn it off .... cools down. Condensation occurs on the components and oxidation will eventually corrode some of the connections and components. Life expectancy of the TV is what your are loosing by using a regular TV in an uncontrolled atmosphere. So you might say " I'll just get a cheap TV and buy a new one when it goes. Unfortunately the cheaper the TV the faster it deteriorate. Don't get me wrong, it could last for years but ..... then again it might not. Out door TV's are sealed but yet have to provide a means to dissipate heat so heat sinks have to be used. Also if the temp gets TOO cold the LCD screen can freeze up and you'll just have a big black blob to look at. Screens have to be made to withstand the extreme's in temperature because the mfg's don't know if it going to a very hot or very cold environment. And obviously, since they don't make millions of them the cost per unit is much higher also.
 
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Old 04-09-14, 01:11 AM
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There's almost nothing accurate in that post.

You obviously don't know how condensation works.. Water condenses on cold surfaces in a warm, humid atmosphere. It defies the laws of thermodynamics to suggest that water is able to condense on a warm surface. Condensation is a problem when you for example bring the TV inside after it had been sitting in the cold all night. But to turn it on in the cold environment?? Absolutely not.

And while we are talking about a state that gets brutal winters, there is not a place on earth where the temperature has been so low that it can completely freeze an LCD panel to the point that it doesn't show anything. Yes, the refresh will be very sluggish when it is first turned on, but it will warm up quickly.

I've had an LCD in my (unheated) garage for years. Aside from the fact that it is CCFL and it's dim/sluggish for a while when it's first turned on in the cold, it works perfectly fine.
 
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Old 04-09-14, 12:22 PM
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And ....... there is obviously not anything but your minor and limited experience considered in this post.

I've been in the home electronics installation business for 45 years and have removed more TV's then you've ever owned.

Condensation ( ie damage due to oxidation) on components is the major cause of damage to home electronics used in uncontrolled environments. After high temperature days condensation occurs at night and during rainy days. I've had LCD screens damaged by being exposed to extreme freezing temperature. Even LCD screens on electronic equipment I decided to leave on my boat one winter.

But I can understand that you might think that your sole experience with one TV makes you the expert.
 
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Old 04-09-14, 02:46 PM
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Lol OK.. Except I also do electronics repair and installation for a living. But I also passed 6th grade earth science - AND as a storm chaser I have a grasp of meteorology.. So unlike you, I understand that condensation has absolutely nothing to do with 'high temperature days'. In fact, the higher the temperature is during the day, the LESS likely something like a TV in a garage is to develop condensation, because the outside air will always cool down faster than the inside air.

Once again, moisture can ONLY condense in a humid environment on a surface that is COLDER than the air.. Unless there is an EXTREME rapid temperature swing from cold to hot (ie: 40 degrees over the course of an hour), and a massive rapid influx of humidity (since heating the air that fast without adding moisture would cause the dewpoint to plummet), the TV - and everything else in the garage will be heating and cooling at roughly the same rate. Not only that, but even the draftiest of garages will still not have the influx of humidity required to cause problematic condensation.

Oh, and then there's the minor detail that oxidation requires.. You know.. An oxidizer. Condensation (unlike rain/snow) is distilled water. It contains no contaminants and no chemically free oxygen, therefore it can not cause oxidation on its own. Put an iron nail into distilled water, and guess what? It won't rust. Dust particles that may be present won't affect anything either when mixed with the condensation.

Now with that said, considering you can buy a 32" flat panel for less than $200, and an 'outdoor' panel of the same size runs about $1500, you'd have to replace the standard one 7 times before you break even on the price difference. And chances are, he'd probably never have to replace it. Once if anything - and odds are better that will be due to a shattered screen from a saw kickback or something . Any actuary can tell you it's a no-brainer to just use the standard one.
 

Last edited by JerseyMatt; 04-09-14 at 03:16 PM.
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Old 04-11-14, 10:10 AM
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TV's installed (not in garages but) outdoors on patios, by swimming pools, waterfront properties, on yachts, near saltwater.

Rain, dew, fog.

Electrolysis.

Lots of people have lots of money.

Through the years I would guess that on average I have replaced one or more "regular" TV's every year that clients have asked me to install outdoors. Even some TV's that have been stored inside over the winter months. Living seaside may account for my higher experienced ( versus your opinionated ) rate. As you pointed out, some people will still use a standard TV. However, some people finally get smart, bite the bullet and install an outdoor TV so that they don't have to pay me to come and change it every time it fails.

End of conversation.
 
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Old 04-11-14, 11:37 AM
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...Except we're talking about a TV in someone's garage in Minnesota, not one mounted outside on a patio exposed to the elements and sea air - which renders your entire argument moot.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 05:24 AM
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Yep ... This thread has run its course. Asked, answered, flogged and closed. Thanks for playing!
 
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