TV Mount

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-25-15, 05:44 PM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
TV Mount

Hi all,

I'm trying to get a good plan together to mount my new TV. It is a 67 pound TV, and mount is 31 pounds and articulates out 28" with swivel and tilt capabilities.

My main concern is that I believe I have metal studs on this wall. It is a wall that borders the garage on one side and living room on the other. It is going above my fireplace. I have ordered this product:
toggles which people seem to rave about.

The TV mount plate has numerous holes to attach to. Would I be alright if I use all 10 of the toggles to mount? Which locations should I use? See picture, please.Name:  IMAG0559[1].jpg
Views: 310
Size:  15.6 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-25-15, 06:12 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Having only metal studs, you don't want to use toggles. You don't just have shear,but angular pressure on the sheetrock. Your best bet would be to locate 3 studs centered on your wall, remove the sheetrock to expose the full metal stud in the middle, and half of the two to each side. Install1/2"sheetrock firmly to your metal studs. Then affix your bracket to the plywood using lag screws. You can caulk the edges and paint it to match your wall.
 
  #3  
Old 02-25-15, 06:55 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Install 1/2"sheetrock firmly to your metal studs
I'm sure Chandler meant 1/2" plywood to studs. It can be blended into the wall, and being behind the TV makes it even easier to blend in.

His advice is not only good as far as support, it also allows you to look into wall and see what's all there. You might get some good ideas on adding recessed receptacles and running other A/V cables.
 
  #4  
Old 02-26-15, 03:57 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,934
Received 227 Votes on 202 Posts
You say the mount is 31#. I assume that is the weight and not the capacity of the mount. Is the mount rated for the TV?
 
  #5  
Old 02-26-15, 05:15 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Well, duh, yeah Brian, thanks for the catch. Why cut out sheetrock to replace it with sheetrock. I meant plywood.
 
  #6  
Old 02-26-15, 06:19 AM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Haha, @Norm yes the mount weighs 31#. It's rated for the TV. Better safe than sorry, thanks for checking up. And thank you all for the advice thus far.

Though I have a handy guy willing to help me out with this project, I'm not very handy myself. I'm wondering if I wouldn't be better off paying for an insured professional to mess with this. The quote so far taking into account TV size and fireplace location, including hiding the wiring which I've decided I want, is $279. I bet they're not counting on metal studs though.
 
  #7  
Old 02-26-15, 06:33 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 750
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Why do you think they are metal studs?
 
  #8  
Old 02-26-15, 06:42 AM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My neighbor was around for the construction of his house. The same company built a bunch of similar houses in the neighborhood. He saw the studs before they were covered. I hoped to prove him wrong, and you're going to laugh at this, but... what I did is drive a trim nail through every hole in the mount template (well, in one horizontal row) looking for a stud. I hit nothing whatsoever. So, I guess I still don't know 100%. What's the recommended way to verify?
 
  #9  
Old 02-26-15, 06:52 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 750
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
There are three ways.

Some of the cheaper or older stud finders will not detect metal studs. If you happen to have one laying around, give it a try.

A better way is to use a very strong magnet and run it against the wall. If it is metal, you will get a strong attraction where the sheet rock screws are and a weaker attraction above and below that spot. If it is wood, you will only get an attraction where the sheet rock screws are.

The best way would be to take the plate cover of one of your outlets. You should be able to see what it is attached to through the holes on the sides, or around the box if the drywall was not cut really snug. Taking the outlet right out of the box might make it easier to see.
 
  #10  
Old 02-26-15, 09:42 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,934
Received 227 Votes on 202 Posts
If a pro installs he should be prepared for metal studing.
 
  #11  
Old 02-26-15, 09:56 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Whats on the back side of the wall? If a closet or some room where a patch wouldn't matter I suggest opening it up.
 
  #12  
Old 02-26-15, 11:33 AM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Behind it is a garage, but more importantly/immediately, a chimney. From putting the nails through it, it at least seems to be a complete wall depth and not just "nailer strips" as my neighbor was afraid of.
 
  #13  
Old 02-26-15, 05:12 PM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Keith, I really liked your idea about using the outlet to find a stud. However, it was too tight to see anything. There was enough space to slide my nail though and it didn't hit anything on either side...

Anyway, I think I can confirm metal studs as they are definitely being used on the wall that comprises the other side of the garage. There was a bashed drywall section and I peeked behind it.
 
  #14  
Old 02-26-15, 05:34 PM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This looks a lot like what you guys were talking about... Think it will handle my situation? Installing a TV Mount to Metal Studs - EAV Instructor Ben Engwall: http://youtu.be/Wz8xYi_5pgg
 
  #15  
Old 02-26-15, 06:25 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
They were installing a flat mount. I understand yours to be an articulating design. You will have considerably more pressure applied. But the installation is correct.
 
  #16  
Old 02-26-15, 07:29 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,934
Received 227 Votes on 202 Posts
If you go to a professional install be sure ask if they have done metal stud installation. And have them explain how they do it. If their explanation runs parallel to this video then you're OK.


My personal comment...This is why I don't like wall mount TVs. Too much hassle, once its done you're stuck with the location. If TV is to be replaced new mounting must be devised. If electrical and data cords are not set behind the mount then they show hanging down and if they are behind mount hey are a pain to get access to (articulated mounts alleviate this problem to a degree). In the rare event of an electrical circuit being out, a free standing unit is easy to relocate to another power outlet. Furniture rearranging is limited due to viewing angle. A free standing TV (especially a large one) can be quickly and easily moved on a moments notice. And last but not least not all people enjoy looking up to watch TV within their living quarters (as opposed to a movie house). Myself, I like the TV at sitting eye level. Much more comfortably and I can even lay down with out neck strain to view. Again just my opinion.
 
  #17  
Old 04-21-15, 06:00 PM
3
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks

This is a little belated, but just wanted to let you know this project came out great. I ended up having wood studs over the fireplace. Unfortunately, I figured this out after I'd already bought the plywood so it didn't span to the two on either side. But 3 big lag screws in the center and toggles holding the corners have done the trick. Very happy with my articulating mount.

Even fished wires up into the attic. Not fun - very little head room towards the periphery of the room where I wanted the outlet. Had some help from a seasoned DIYer down the street, but also stretched my handyman limits considerably (not that that's saying much)
 
  #18  
Old 04-21-15, 06:25 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Thanks for letting us know the outcome. Your experiences may help someone else.
 
  #19  
Old 04-27-15, 05:19 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,074
Received 75 Votes on 69 Posts
You would have wanted at least two toggles into metal stud(s) or two wood screws (min. #12) penetrating the stud itself at least 1-1/2 inches for wood studs, near the upper left of the mount plate or plywood all within 3 inches of the top edge. Repeat for the upper right.

For an assembly that spanned 3 studs, use two at top center, one at top left, and one at top right as a minimum.

In your case with just one stud in use, one lag screw, the one highest up, is doing almost all the work. A second lag screw would contribute a lot if it too were within 3 inches of the top of the plywood panel. The toggles going into drywall with no stud behind contribute negligible help in keeping the entire assembly from tilting and breaking off the wall where, if you telescoped the TV out from the wall, there would be substantial force from gravity trying to wrench the entire assembly free.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: