500 watt pc speakers for overseas

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-23-15, 03:38 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 247
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
500 watt pc speakers for overseas

I have the logitech z-680 5.1 speakers and they are from the US so it uses the 110V. But I want to use it overseas for 220V. What kind of step-down transformer will I need? I'm not sure if 2K VA step down transformer is enough power or more than enough. How about 1K VA?

What if I don't use the speakers full blast and keep it down to low volume, will that ensure the wattage won't go over say a 200 or 300 watt transformer? I'm assuming that 500 watts means if I were to blast it 100% then it would use 500 watts. But for everyday normal levels, should it be okay using a 200 watt step down transformer?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-23-15, 04:04 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,512
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
While we wait for the pros, just want to comment that 2 watts of sound from any speaker would break your ear drums. To control the speaker and provide a better frequency response, a speaker may have as low as a 2% efficiency rating. Drive it with 20 watts and the sound delivered would be closer to 0.4 watts and that is loud.

The 500 watt rating is for the electronics, not the sound in the room. Others will correct me as needed.

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 03-23-15, 04:44 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,481
Received 599 Votes on 553 Posts
Where are you taking the speakers? Make sure they also use 60hz.
 
  #4  
Old 03-23-15, 04:46 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Near Buffalo, NY
Posts: 4,239
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
The speakers' RMS power is rated at 505 watts, but the (unpublished) power supply requirements are no doubt higher. Look for a label on the back of the subwoofer near the AC power cord. If there isn't one, look for a circuit breaker or fuse rating (in amps). Use a step-down that's rated for the proper voltage and watts.

You should never use a power supply that's rated less than the device.

(Edit: Changed "step-up" to "step-down")
 

Last edited by Rick Johnston; 03-25-15 at 04:07 AM.
  #5  
Old 03-23-15, 05:23 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 247
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry, I'm confused now. Do I need to buy a "step down" transformer or "step up" transformer? I thought it was a step-down I needed since the overseas country is using 220V and this speaker system is made for 110V, so I would need to buy a transformer that 'steps-down' from 220V to 110V right?

Yes, its 60Hz also. I was looking online and found a step-down transfomer rated at 1000W. The price is only $18. Is this about right? I wouldn't need a 2000W transformer (more than I would need?) i think?
 
  #6  
Old 03-23-15, 05:38 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 247
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
@Bud, oh good point! Yes, I think I see the difference now about watts and volume.
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-15, 06:10 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 247
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
oh another thing, the step down transformer i'm looking at buying says 220V to 110V but the voltage rating on the back of my speaker says 120V 60Hz. Will it work fine on a 110V?
 
  #8  
Old 03-25-15, 04:10 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Near Buffalo, NY
Posts: 4,239
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
You're correct, it's a step-down. Thanks for the catch.

Is there a label on the back of the sub? The manual says it's capable of 1000w peak output (at 10% distortion), which means it could draw more power than that since it's not 100% efficient.

For the record, Bud is talking about acoustical watts, not electrical watts.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: