TV conversion to bookcase


  #1  
Old 03-30-01, 12:10 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Cool

How do you take the picture tube and all the insides out of a console television? We want to make a bookcase out of the cabinet. Thanks

LH
 
  #2  
Old 03-30-01, 01:22 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 1,149
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I will assume that since this tv is being guted that it has not been working for an extended period of time, and has been unpluged for an extended period of time, and therefore
there is no longer any concern of shocks from the inside (some components can hold a charge even after the tv is turned off).

If all of its parts is going to be thrown out , then just disconnect all wires attached to the yoke (back) of the picture tube, remove the wire on the side of the tube, find the screws or bolts that hold the main board in place remove these and push out the board. If you look closely inside the tv, I think you can easily figure out what is holding the components to the cabinet. You may have to cut wires going to the speakers, -unplug what you can, cut what you can't unplug. The picture tube handle with care , when you release it from the cabinet.

To say again, my main concern is ..

1. that there is no longer charge left on the board or tube (has not been used for an extended period of time, which I assume to be not an issue since you are throwing it out)

2. the picture tube is handled with care.

3. advice on the picture tubes disposal is sought.



 
  #3  
Old 03-30-01, 01:44 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you for your information. Actually, the tv just quit working within the past few days. About a week ago the picture faded out and all I have are narrow white horizonal lines. After it was off a while the picture would come back. That went on for several days and now all we have is a very faint picture (not clear at all). So...that's why we thought we would just make a bookcase out of it. The set is at least 8 years old. Do you think it could be the picture tube? Thanks again!
 
  #4  
Old 03-30-01, 02:14 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 1,149
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Then if that is the case just wait a day or two before deciding on anything, I was under the impression that it was already a done decision, and it hadn't recently worked.
I have a couple things that I thought of that could cause this, but we also have a couple of others that have a massive background & experience on this, and who would be better and more precise on there advice on this perticular problem. Smokey is one of those that I'm sure would be more than happy to give some advice on this, and rather it would be worth the effort to repair.
 
  #5  
Old 03-30-01, 02:54 PM
Smokey
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thumbs up

Good evening, Don (and L. Hay):

The dim picture and the narrow horizontal lines indicate a picture tube being bad. This is a classic filament to cathode short. It can occur on any one of the three guns because the cathodes are all common (connected together).

When gutting the set, the first and foremost care is with the stored high voltage (as Don said). When you take the back off the set and look at the interior, you can see the back side of the picture tube. At the top, center, of the picture tube is a heavy wire that is affixed to the glass. This is the High Voltage Lead and originally carried a voltage of 25-45,000 volts. If the set has been off for 24 hours, the chances of this voltage still being there are minimal. But, as a precaution, wrap a wire around a screw driver and hook the other end to the TV chassis. Slid the screwdriver under the rubber cap on the picture tube. If there is voltage stored, you will heard a loud "SNAP". Once it is gone, there is no electrical danger.

Second danger: implosion of the picture tube. While the glass and face of the picture tube are of substantial strength, the neck of the picture tube is fragile. If you crack the neck of the picture tube during dismounting, you will incur an implosion. This is not a pretty sight.
When removing the picture tube, do everything in the world to protect the neck of the tube. NEVER HANDLE THE PICTURE TUBE BY THE NECK.

Once you have the picture tube out, what to do with it. Put it in a cardboard box and secure it tightly. Drive a steel rod into the box (or something substantial) against the neck of the tube. A quick "WHACK" and the tube will implode inside the box. Once it is imploded, you can dispose of it as you will in the garbage. If you do not implode it, you are sending a bomb out for someone else to encounter.

The rest is unbolting and throwing away.

Have a good life and be kind to one another.

Smokey
 
  #6  
Old 03-30-01, 05:37 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you all for all the information. I really do appreciate it.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: