video tape repair

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-14-01, 12:27 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
My vcr "ate" one of my tapes. How do I repair the tape so that it is watchable again? The tape is pretty torn up toward the beginning, but the rest seems to be okay.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-14-01, 12:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 1,165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You really only have 2 choices here, scrap the tape, or to open the case throw out the beginning portion of the tape up to past the portion that is damaged, and attach the new beginning to the spool being carefull that is threaded properly and everything is in place. You could quickly become frustrated enough that you end up scraping it anyway.

Depending how precious the tape , my first thought is that it is not worth the effort , throw the tape out. Don't try to slice the tape, you will end up damaging the video heads, and if that happens , it won't be worth repair.

I work at a broadcast tv station, and the only time that it even be considered to splice a tape, is if it is a hot news story that was shot by a eng camera, and there is simply no other copy of it in existance, then and only then would it be splcied with professional splicing tape, and played only once to copy it.

The first issue here is to find out why it wa eaten in the first place and to correct the issue before it happens again. I have only dealt you with in this post your question about the tape.



[Edited by dkerr on 04-14-01 at 02:58]
 
  #3  
Old 04-24-01, 10:19 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks. I think I'm just going to get a new tape and pitch the old one.
I don't know a lot about VCR's. What should I do to check out my vcr so that it doesn't devour any more tapes?
-Filo
 
  #4  
Old 04-26-01, 10:23 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 1,165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Assuming this is only an occassional occurance and not a permanent problem with your vcr. Just make sure everything along the threading path is clean, any stickyness or buildup here could pull the tape around the capstan and "eating" the tape.

http://www.fixer.com/

http://www.fixer.com/osm/cleaning.html

http://www.fixer.com/osm/index.html

http://www.fixer.com/dbase/index.html

This is a site that will give you an unstanding on how your vcr works, the first link is the home page to this site and the other links are inportant pages within the site, including one that gives an explanation on how to clean your machine, there is also a database that you can get specific information about your perticular make and model of vcr.
 
  #5  
Old 04-26-01, 04:00 PM
Smokey
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thumbs up

All good advice from my Canadian counterpart.

One thing to consider about a VCR that has "ate" a tape, though, is to why it ate the tape.

If a VCR has had prolonged use, oxides build up on the tape path. There are pressure (pinch) rollers in the tape path that are made from a composite rubber. These have a tendency to accumulate oxide and get "gummy". As a result, they can adhere themselves to the tape and cause the tape to wrap up in the mechanism.

Today we have a new breed of VCRs that call themselves "self cleaning". This term pertains to the video heads on the machine and has nothing to do with the tape path and guides. A periodic cleaning every 8 -24 hours of running with a "WET" video tape cleaner will minimize this problem.

When I say "WET", VCR tape cleaners come in either a "WET" or "DRY" type. The WET type requires that you add a few drops of cleaning fluid to the tape, put it in the machine, and run it for a short time. The DRY type does not use fluid. The DRY type is extremely abrasive and causes undue wear on the video heads, themselves. I DO NOT recommend using the DRY version.

Also, dkerr made mention of "eng tapes". That term means "electronic news gathering". In broadcast, they send a team out with anywhere from one to five videotape recording units to record as much information as they can for any one situation. The Production Engineer takes all the taped information and edits it into a useable broadcast tape. Hence, a clean tape path and a functioning videotape recorder are a definite asset to this type of situation.
I will not bore you with Beta and Digital recording, though.

Just clean your VCR now and then and avoid the tape wraps.


Smokey
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: