wall-mounting a big TV.

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Old 01-18-20, 12:19 PM
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wall-mounting a big TV.

I'm planning to wall mount a 75" TV. These TV's are pretty heavy. It makes me nervous, esp because TVs are ~2 grands. I would appreciate if you guys can share your experiences and tips.
Do the usual mounts hold well over the years?
 
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Old 01-18-20, 12:23 PM
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You must use a wall bracket that encompasses at least two wall studs. The holes must be pre-drilled and they MUST be in the center of the stud. Do you have wood studs ?

I mark the location of the hole and bracket and then use a small ice pic or screwdriver to actually locate the edges of the stud.

Do you have the wall bracket ? Post the make and model of it.
 
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Old 01-18-20, 12:59 PM
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The key is getting a good mounting kit, one that is designed for the size and weight of the tv being mounted,

Then as mentioned you got to get it mounted solid into the wall, what ever you have!

Do it right, it's not going anywhere!
 
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Old 01-18-20, 02:11 PM
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If you have wood wall studs there are many wall mounts available to support the weight of TVs under 130 lbs. for years to come. The need starting out, though, is two-fold. First, find the studs you'll be attaching the mount to and measure the space between them. Not all mounts fit all stud spacing, although most fit a variety of spacings. Second, check your TV manual for mounting requirements. Many TVs have specific requirements not found in all mounts. Then, make certain the mount supports more weight than your TV, preferably a lot more.
 

Last edited by Tony P.; 01-18-20 at 02:31 PM.
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Old 01-18-20, 02:22 PM
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All the mounts I use including the large ones use a slotted wall track so that stud spacing is not a concern.
 
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Old 01-18-20, 06:37 PM
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Old 01-18-20, 07:06 PM
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I like using the dual arm style. The one in the first link is the style I use. The TV hangs on the top of the bracket and locks into the bottom. Those two strings are for unlocking the TV from the bracket.

Dual arm style
Tiltable Echogear
 
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Old 01-18-20, 08:35 PM
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Thanks for sharing these.
I found another like these:
https://www.amazon.com/ECHOGEAR-Prof...es&sr=1-3&th=1

I am looking to keep the profile slim for esthetics. This last one has profile of 1.25" from the wall.
 
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Old 01-19-20, 05:57 AM
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If for any reason you cannot center the TV due to stud locations, you can mount one or two 1 x 3's to the wall and then mount the bracket to it.
 
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Old 01-19-20, 07:00 AM
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I now use the tilt mounts only~

Fixed mounts make it extremely difficult to reach the plugs/connections. Plus as you would expect if your room seating is slightly askew from the TV you can compensate!
 
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Old 01-19-20, 07:40 AM
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I would also recommend a TV mount you can tile down. Mounts that hold a TV flat to the wall will give you horrible glare if there are any lights in the room.
 
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Old 01-19-20, 09:08 AM
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Most of the mounts tilt up and down. The ones I try to shy away from with large TV's are the ones where the TV can be pulled out from the wall and turned.

With the slotted track type of mount and the two arms.... you can slide the TV on the track if it's not 100% centered.
 
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Old 01-19-20, 12:49 PM
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The ones I try to shy away from with large TV's are the ones where the TV can be pulled out from the wall and turned.
That's the ones I use, they are super solid and very easy to adjust! Sanus brand!
 
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Old 01-19-20, 01:15 PM
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To each his own. I would never attach a TV to wall. Get a cabinet and place the TV on it. Advantages?...Eye level, no neck straining, no holes in the wall or the worry that it might fall down (and a lot less work), can be easily moved from place to place or not. No wires to be hidden or crawling up or down the wall. No special electrical outlets to be installed at TV level. Very easy to adjust, fix or replace components or the TV itself (considering a TV life expectancy is about 7 years before newer tech takes it's place). If you use cable and it goes out, it's a snap to add rabbit ear antenna. Disadvantages? If you're really cramped for room and a large TV isn't really what you should be using. And it needs to be secured to prevent it from falling on top of kids if your kids are the type to let that happen.

 
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