No sound from my Pioneer VSX-2000 Stereo reciever


  #1  
Old 01-03-02, 03:12 PM
mayhem8318
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Unhappy No sound from my Pioneer VSX-2000 Stereo reciever

A little while ago, I had gotten new woofers for my home stereo. I hooked them up, but when I turned on my stereo, the receiver worked for about ten minutes, then shut off all of a sudden. I then unplugged it, plugged it back in, then turned it back on. Nothing happened. So, I replaced the fuse, which had appeared to have been blown. I turned it back on, and the display worked fine, it switched funtions(tuner, cd, ect...), but no sound was produced. What could this be, and can I fix it myself? Any help would be appreciated a million times over. Thanx.
 
  #2  
Old 01-08-02, 05:36 AM
bigmike
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Was this question ever answered? I don't remember reading it...
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-02, 12:21 PM
mayhem8318
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No, it hasn't been answered. I've been waiting for a while now, and your the first person to even reply........ ya got any answers to my little dilema here?
 
  #4  
Old 01-14-02, 10:15 AM
bigmike
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Cool Type

Sorry it took so long but you slipped thru the crack… Well sounds like the finals went. For whatever reason I can’t find this unit in the net but would think this has the IC for the outputs instead of the transistors. To figure it out, look at the component that is attached to the large aluminum heat sink. If it’s one fairly larger IC and the other will be 4 to six small transistors stuck to it. If it’s the large IC it’s not that big of a deal, $50 or so. If it’s the multiple xsistors then it could get a little complicated. Let me know the type you have…
 

Last edited by bigmike; 01-14-02 at 04:27 PM.
  #5  
Old 01-15-02, 02:24 PM
mayhem8318
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I checked it out, and it's the transistor type. So, whatta ya think? What is the "complicating" solution?
 
  #6  
Old 01-15-02, 03:48 PM
bigmike
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Here we go...

Well how much electronics experience do you have? You will need a digital Ohm Meter and be able to identify a transistor. You need to “Front to Back” the xsistors to see if they are shorted. You are going to have to de-solder them from the board to do this test. The board may be marked as far as Emitter, Base and Collector. If not ECG will have the pinouts. You need to ck between the Emitter and Collector, if you get ANY kind of reading on “Diode” setting of the meter then they are shorted. No reading doesn’t necessarily mean they are bad so you if there is no reading then you need to drop back to the pre-amps and see if they went. Since I cannot find out anything about this stereo I am going to assume it’s either very new or perhaps from the UK? Still under warranty? If the unit is under say $200 US then I would consider replacing it. You also want to use the meter to ck the speakers, make sure they “OHM” out at 8 Ohms give or take 5%. It’s not so much that it’s hard to do but knowing the tolerances of the components is the key. This is not taught in any school or book per say but in experience. You can initially check the condition of the outputs by attaching the Ohm Meter to the + and – of the right channel speaker output, (Messed up here sorry 1/19/02) on the 100/200 millivolt scale. With the power on and the function selector of the unit set to like CD (not FM or AM) with nothing hooked up including speakers and Ø volume. See what the voltage is on the speaker outputs. Anything over say 450 Millivolt and the outputs are suspect. Real high reading shows a definite problem. BUT the 450 Millivolt reading may also be caused from cheap outputs, a leaky capacitor, bad ground… People never understood why it cost so much to repair components. There is a lot to learn/know and troubleshooting is the most time consuming part of the job. Changing the part out is no big deal, usually… Let’s see, I am looking at a Weller soldering station, $200. A Weller de-soldering station $300+. A Fluke meter, $375. And that’s just to start. An inexpensive dual trace say Tektronix 60 MHz scope, used, $350. A truly good oscilloscope runs around $2000 to start. Handhelds from Fluke or Sperry, $3500 to $5000. Anyway pardon the rant… (**I initally said to set the meter on the OHM scale. I was tired when I wrote this and meant to say to set meter on the 100/200 Millivolt scale. Please pardon the mistake.**)
 

Last edited by bigmike; 01-19-02 at 07:44 AM.
 

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