ceilings made higher


  #1  
Old 03-24-00, 09:14 PM
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Has anyone had experience removing the ceiling and somehow making it higher. I would like any suggestions. My cottage size home needs some help in making rooms SEEM bigger. thanks cmae
 
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Old 03-24-00, 10:15 PM
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You probably don't want to know how much is involved in raising a ceiling. Basically you are looking at rebuilding the cottaage from the top of the walls , up!! (making the walls taller, trusses, roof,...). ballpark, figure between $30 and $50 per sq. ft.
 
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Old 03-25-00, 03:01 AM
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You asked the wrong question. The right question was how do I make my roof go higher. Once you raise the roof, the ceiling will follow. Big time job, big expense, big mess. My advice is don't go there. Lefty's
estimate is low. Try about $125.00 sq. ft.
Good Luck

------------------
Jack the Contractor
 
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Old 03-25-00, 06:53 AM
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And this is certainly not a run of the mill DIY job!

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Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 07-21-06 at 04:17 AM.
  #5  
Old 03-27-00, 09:01 PM
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I think there are a couple of cheaper things maybe I can do with the ceilings. One I could simply remove the sheetrock then lay new sheetrock above the joists and do something to the exposed boards. Anyone done that. I really am enjoying the feedback.
 
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Old 03-28-00, 04:11 PM
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There will more than likely be a stiffback brace in your way. It should be running perpendicular to your joists at the halfway point in the room. It is probably only a 2x4, but could be a 2x6. It is there to keep the joists from rolling and sagging.

If you remove it, remember why it was placed there to begin with.

If there is no brace - have a great project!

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Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 07-21-06 at 04:17 AM.
  #7  
Old 07-18-06, 11:36 AM
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Question re: raising ceiling of 1-story

Hello,

I'm new to this site and am currently remodeling my very small bathroom (5'W x 7'L x 8'H). I've sifted through many threads re: raising ceilings but am unsure as to whether or not to pursue this endeavor. Some say don't do it and others say it's do-able.

I'm interested in expanding the space into the attic. Here are some details about my thoughts, what I've read here and what the current situation is:

- Roof joists are 2 x 5.5. I've read that insulation for roof ceilings should be 8" to fit into a 2x10 space. So, what is recommended for insulating in a 2x5 joist space? Or is insulation needed at all beneath the fiber board I've thought about installing?
- I don't plan to remove any already existant boards but rather leave the rafters and install extender joists, attaching them to the already extant joists and to the roof joists. Then I would nail fiber board onto that as with the rest of the bathroom.
- Since it is a bathroom, do you recommend installing tar paper over the roof joists (and over insulation, if applicable)?
- If extending the ceiling makes sense, where would the best place to re-install the ceiling vent/fan for maximum effectiveness?

If I don't have to extend the roof joists to 10", this renovation will add about 5' of vertical space in the bathroom at the highest point, which would do wonders for the small feeling of the space. If I have to add inching to the joists, I will still have an additional 4'+ of vertical space.
 
  #8  
Old 07-20-06, 07:37 PM
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Hello,
Your roof joists that size are 2x6. They would not be strong enough to walk on, if you plan on using space above to live in. For a floor to be created above you would definetly have to go to a larger joist.
Where are you located? Pick up a copy of the building codes that apply for your area. You local town may have some bylaws that would come into play as well.
 

Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 07-21-06 at 04:18 AM.
 

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