Need Advice. Floor has settled, wall is separating from ceiling

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-20-20, 08:19 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Need Advice. Floor has settled, wall is separating from ceiling

Last year I completed construction of a new Master Bath (yes, my house didn't have a master bathroom). I divided the large master in half and installed two non-load bearing walls. I made, what is appearing to be, two mistakes that are coming back to bite me.
  1. I reused a wall frame from a different part of the room that was being demolished. The wall was a bit short for where I was placing it. Apparently the floor sagged/ceiling was higher in this area than where the frame came from. I went with it anyway since it wasn't load bearing. I did secure it to the ceiling drywall using anchors and nailed it to the floor. It was pretty solid when I finished but it was not connected to rafters in the attic as they were going parallel to the new wall and it was in between two rafters.
  2. I had the drywall guy finish before the tile guy/plumber. I think that's relevant because...

The problem I'm having is that the floor is now supporting quite a bit of weight it wasn't before: A large amount of tile, a double vanity, a toilet, a new shower, a pretty extensive closet organizer, and the two new walls themselves. The settling has literally pulled the top of the wall away from the ceiling. There is a visible tear in the top. If I'm standing in the closet with the lights off, but the vanity lights on, I can literally see light shining through the top of the wall. The door in that wall, which was perfectly square at first is now catching and is out of square. Pics:

Name:  IMG_2775.jpg
Views: 59
Size:  19.7 KB
Name:  IMG_2777.jpg
Views: 43
Size:  19.2 KB

I have checked the beam of the downstairs room below and it isn't even slightly bent so I don't think this is structurally in danger of collapse or anything, but I'm not quite sure if I should just re-square the door and repair the drywall or if I should attempt to connect the top of the wall to the rafters in the attic. I know that's not really what rafters are for (pulling a wall up). Instead they are for supporting loads downward, right? I don't think I'm dealing with a structural integrity problem as much as a settling problem that the door and sheetrock are revealing. Is there something I should do structurally or is this a common cosmetic thing that would have been preventable if I'd sheetrocked the walls and installed the door after the weight was installed?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-20-20, 08:29 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 24,829
Received 434 Votes on 397 Posts
Hard to say. But problems like that -can be- related to the way the sheetrock was hung. In houses with trusses, you "shouldnt" fasten the drywall around the ceiling perimeter... that drywall should just float and be supported by the drywall on the walls. That allows some movement in the corner joints as building materials shrink and swell due to changes in the seasons.

But if the top plate wasn't fastened to anything that could be a big part of it too. When a top plate falls between ceiling joists, you are supposed to put perpendicular framing in every 24" or so, so that the wall is actually fastened to something. You cant expect drywall not to crack when the framing can still move.

Also of note, we can see the fiberglass tape. (Another strike against it.) Fiberglass tape must be bedded in setting compound to increase its strength. Regular joint compound and mesh tape is bound to fail.

The door sagging could be unrelated. Improperly installed doors will sag over time.
 
  #3  
Old 02-20-20, 10:16 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Point taken that I definitely should have done the perpendicular supports. As for the door, it was properly installed. It isn't sagging, the frame is contorting with the middle wall dropping. I'm attaching a pic of it now. You can see if that wall settled because the floor sank a bit in the middle (where the other wall joins it) after the door was installed, it would cause this binding.

Name:  IMG_2778.jpg
Views: 38
Size:  10.2 KB

Any suggestions for what I should do at this point? I'm willing to put the perpendicular in now if you think it will help. If it's merely cosmetic at this point, I could put up crown moulding.
 
  #4  
Old 02-21-20, 07:09 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 24,829
Received 434 Votes on 397 Posts
The picture resolution makes it hard to see any problem. Is it hitting on the top right? Cuz all I can make out is that there is a lot of light on the latch side from the latch being loose in the strike plate, or the door stop needs adjusted.

Yeah crown molding is a good solution, but it wont stay tight against the ceiling either if there's nothing to nail the top edge to. A small bed molding might be nice.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: