Ducted dehumidifier behind the wall?

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  #1  
Old 06-29-05, 07:40 AM
SNB
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Question Ducted dehumidifier behind the wall?

I have a 1/2 finished basement that needs a dehumidifier. I am turning it into a playroom/entertainment room. Is there such a thing as a small dehumidifier that could be installed in an adjacent utility room, with ducted intake and output to/from the room I want to dehumidify?

I am aware of the ones that install onto your central HVAC, but I don't need that since it's only the one room in the basement that has occasional problems. I don't want to set a portable one in the room itself, because they are loud, take up valuable space, are unattractive, and need a drain hose/pipe to run through the wall, and we're trying to make this room not feel like a basement.

Short of placing a portable one in the utility room and attaching ducts to it (would have to be rigged), I am not sure if such a product exists... thanks.
 
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Old 06-30-05, 01:30 AM
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No, you won't find anything that small.. Just have to use the free standing unit.. Just let it drip into the pan itself, and you won't have to worry about hose..

the LG unit has a "quiet" mode.. you can turn it off and it will turn itself in after X amount of time.

Lot of these newer unit are quiet, and should not be a issue like the old ones.

I would NOT advise to ridge up a unit to use a duct.. You'll be asking for trouble.
 
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Old 06-30-05, 08:45 AM
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Thanks for the reply. I hadn't been able to find anything online, so it was worth asking. Maybe someday I'll develop one of these and market it. There's a market for everything...
 
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Old 08-06-05, 01:09 PM
Kprods
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dehumidifier ducting

I have a similar need, I have a small house without A/C in the Virginia mountains. It rarely gets hot, but does get humid. I'm thinking about installing this:
http://www.aprilaire.com/category.as...1DBB024BF068FA

I'm still researching the unit. It may be too much for you, but it has a wall mounted 'humastat', you can set the level from 40 to 60 % relative humidity.

If I get more info I will let you know. $1,025 is the lowest price I have found
 
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Old 03-01-09, 08:25 AM
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To SNB or anyone! Basement Dehumidification.

I have exactly the same situation as you do. I have an L shaped basement room which serves as an extra bedroom and an office. I really don't need a big basement or whole house type of dehumidifiier and I also have been researching how to put a small unit in an adjacent room. I had no success checking out the web, calling dehumidifier stores, hvac guys, etc. Just this past week I was watching DIY network and they showed a basement remodel where they cut a hole in the wall and built a shelf in the adjacent utility room to hold a small dehumidifier. They used a grill to cover up the hole in the finished room which they claim will allow the air to flow through to the dehumidifier. Since it has been many years since your post, I was wondering what (if any) solution you decided on. I am trying to avoid both the noise and the heat in the finished area. The kenmore I have now throws a great deal of heat. I would greatly appreciate your response or input from anyone about possible approaches to this problem. I am new to this forum and think it's great. Any help appreciated! Thanks & have a great day!
 
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Old 03-01-09, 09:12 AM
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Because you are in a green grass state you will benefit from a large dehumidifier. This will come into play during non load times and during days of wet weather. You will always have heat from a dehumidifier so you will not be able to do any thing about that.
 
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Old 03-01-09, 02:56 PM
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Hi airman - thanks for taking the time to reply. I'm sure you're right and that's likely what I'll end up doing. I just wanted to make sure there's nothing out there I'm missing. So thanks again - I sincerely appreciate your input! Have a great day!
 
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Old 07-20-09, 05:53 PM
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Hi all! I've been researching portable air conditioners. I notice that they don't get great reviews for air conditioning but a few have a dehumidifier setting and they vent through a duct hose out the window. I'm thinking this may be an option. Any thoughts or suggestions?
Thanks!
Stan
 
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Old 07-20-09, 09:53 PM
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The dehumidification function of portable air conditioners is just barely better than worthless. It would only work if the temperature in the room were to stay above 70 degrees and even then it will not do that much.

Also, I always recommend against single hose (duct) portable A/C units because they pump inside conditioned air out through that single hose while outside unconditioned air must seep in through whatever leaks are present in the house to replace that lost conditioned air. If you are going to purchase a portable then spend the extra dollars and buy a two hose model.
 
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Old 07-21-09, 07:45 AM
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Hi Furd! Thanks so much for your quick reply & info. I did read where the 2 hose units are much better for the reason you state. However, I was not aware that the temperature affected the performance so significantly. The temp. in the room I have always hovers around the mid 60s, so if what you say is true, this option will not likely help me at all. Thank you for bringing it to my attention. I sincerely appreciate it! Guess I'll have to keep researching. Have a great day!
Stan
 
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Old 07-31-12, 03:04 PM
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I tried a new electronic device TERGO, now 4 months. I'm monitoring the humidity and believe me with excellent results.
 

Last edited by hvactechfw; 07-31-12 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 08-08-12, 12:55 AM
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There is nothing wrong with ducting a portable dehumidifier. There is, however, some considerations that need to be addressed. If you are running short ducting, ie 5' or less from either the intake or exhaust side, the machine should be able to handle it provided the ducting is 8" diameter. A sheet metal box for both the front and back of the machine will have to be built about 12" in length. Set your desired humidity level on the controls and attach the sheet metal boxes to the dehumidifier with aluminum duct tape.Cut a round hole 8" in diameter centered in the intake area and install a flex duct collar. Do the same at the back of the machine at the center of the discharge area. Attach your flex duct with duct tape to the collars and run the flex duct to the wall board locations you desire. If you cut tight fitting holes in your wall board, you will not need additional duct collars. Cover the duct openings with venting grills and you are done. If you need longer than 5' duct runs on your installation, you will need to install a "duct booster fan" in the discharge side of the ducting as the portable units internal fan will not be strong enough to adequately move a longer column of air. Of course you will need to install a drain line and have a power outlet for the dehumidifier. Be careful with a drain line, water will not flow uphill, mount your dehumidifier on a shelf if necessary to provide adequate drop for water drain flow. If needed, you can install a "condensate pump" in your collection pan that will automatically pump the water to an appropriate drain. Depending on how fancy you want to get, you can cut an access panel in the metal box at the front of the machine and put a hinged opening on it for access to the switches. I might mention that contrary to what some people think, a dehumidifier adds very little heat to a conditioned space. The air is first chilled as it passes the cold coils and then re-heated with the same heat that was removed from the air. A small amount of heat is generated by the very small compressor internally, but not enough to be a problem. Lastly, a small room air conditioner makes a great dehumidifier provided you don't put it in the wall. Just set it somewhere in the room and make sure you have water collection hose attached. This would not appeal to most people as the small a/c will be noisier than a smaller dehumidifier and water collection is sometimes a challenge, but for a larger area like a large unfinished basement, it works super. I have also set up a system on one occasion using a wall a/c to cool or dehumidify. I added ducting to the outside of the unit with a damper that could be positioned to exhaust warm air or positioned to return the warm air through another duct back inside the conditioned space. This was a manual damper, but it could be motorized and controlled by a humidistat. You see, a dehumidifier is simply a smaller version of a window a/c that discharges the warm air back to the room instead of outdoors.
 

Last edited by podunk; 08-08-12 at 01:16 AM.
 

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