HE360, why not install on return side?

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Old 12-30-09, 06:30 PM
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HE360, why not install on return side?

I've done a lot of reading the forums (thanks!), but still have a question planning the install for a Honeywell HE360A.

There is not much room to mount the unit on the supply side where the instructions say it should be for a highboy type furnace. The video specifically said not to put it on the return side for this model. My question is why? What harm would it do or would it just be less efficient?

It would be a whole lot easier to put it on the return as far as I can tell with the space I am working with.

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-30-09, 06:54 PM
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Humidifier needs hot air to do the job.. When it's on the return, the air is cool, and it won't be as efficient.

If you only have room on the return, then I'd suggest to return the unit, and get the bypass unit. (HE220/260)
 
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Old 12-31-09, 11:02 AM
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thanks for the info jay, more importantly though thanks for all the other posts you have answered our silly questions! I found a spot that would work on the supply side and had a wiring problem that your other posts helped with!
 
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Old 12-31-09, 04:46 PM
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Glad to help out.

YOu have a Happy New Year!
 
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Old 01-05-10, 08:48 AM
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Somewhat related question on placement

I have a drum bypass humidifier (HE120) that I am planning on installing according to the instructions (placing unit on supply, and running bypass to the return). However, this is an attic furnace, and the return is on the floor, while the supply goes up out of the unit (highboy).

So it means the supply is about 3 feet above the return...do you think I will have an issue with the warm/moist air going down 3 feet to get back to the return? Not sure if the force coming out of the supply will be enough to get the hot air back down? Should I worry about this, or just see what happens?

Thanks in advance...reading through this site has definitely helped...
 
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Old 01-05-10, 09:58 AM
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Ugh.. I would NOT suggest putting this on your furnace in the attic. Way too risky for freeze up.

Just use the free standing unit, or do a steam unit where the unit is mounted in the living space.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 10:18 AM
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ugh...

oh, thanks...I was a little worried about possibility of freezing...I am in NJ, so the attic gets pretty cold, but I was thinking I would be relatively safe (I measure it at around 38 degrees the other night when outside temps were around 20...we aren't nearly as cold as Rochester, MN...).

I do have a separate furnace in the basement that I was going to hold off on putting a humidifier on because I wanted to humidify the sleeping floor first (main living space is on 1st floor, but sleeping on the 2nd floor). But maybe I should actually put it in the basement (it stays pretty warm since it is 3/4 finished) and see if that would find it's way to the second floor? I do have a large foyer entrance with 20 foot ceilings, and the return for the attic furnace is pulling air from right next to that foyer?

Is that a better plan?
 

Last edited by teevan; 01-05-10 at 10:26 AM. Reason: clarification
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Old 01-05-10, 10:49 AM
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Yeah, that's much better.

Just never know when you get a hard cold snap like we are getting now.. this morning was -12˚. Few days ago it was -20˚.

Humidity will find it's way to the dry area slowly. and I'd hate to see you have a water damaged ceiling from frozen pipes.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 11:21 AM
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great, thanks

Thanks a bunch for the help...will go the basement route; probably better to be safe than sorry.

Good luck staying warm this winter...
 
 

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