Humidifier choices

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Old 01-15-10, 10:26 AM
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Humidifier choices

Need help in choosing a replacement humidifier for a 2-zone 3950 sq. ft home (including the basement). I inherited a Honeywell when I purchased the home and the valve is damaged. I'm getting dizzy with all of the different types of humidifiers out there. I'm trying to choose among:

1) Steam vs. by-pass vs. fan-powered vs. flow-through by-pass
2) Aprilaire vs. Carrier
2) If Aprilaire, 700M vs 700A

Or should I just replace the valve on the existing Honeywell? I only intend to place a humidifier at the lower-level zone--would I also need a console unit for the upper level of my home? I ultimately hope to get good humidity while controlling cost, mold, and duct rust. Help!
 

Last edited by lazuli; 01-15-10 at 10:36 AM. Reason: more clarity
  #2  
Old 01-15-10, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by lazuli View Post
Need help in choosing a replacement humidifier for a 2-zone 3950 sq. ft home
Is this one furnace or two furnace? (Some get them mixed up)

1) Steam vs. by-pass vs. fan-powered vs. flow-through by-pass
What's there now? I'd stay with the same that's there now.

2) Aprilaire vs. Carrier
Carrier is made by Aprilaire. You may pay more for the Carrier.

Both Aprilaire, and Honeywell are petty much the same.

2) If Aprilaire, 700M vs 700A
M is manual control, A is auto control.

Or should I just replace the valve on the existing Honeywell?
If the unit itself, and the controls are in good shape, I'd say new valve. be easier to do than putting in a new humidifier.

-would I also need a console unit for the upper level of my home?
You'll have to wait and see how it works out once you get it running, may not need another unit.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Jay11J View Post
Is this one furnace or two furnace? (Some get them mixed up)
There are two furnaces, one in the basement, one in the attic. I am only attaching a humidifier to the one in the basement
What's there now? I'd stay with the same that's there now.
Currently there is a Honeywell HE365A there now. It is about 6 years old. The valve is not working. The humidifier also needs to be relocated to a more accessible location. Do yo still think I should keep the existing humidifier?


Thank you for your responses.
 

Last edited by Jay11J; 01-18-10 at 01:31 PM. Reason: fixed quote.
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Old 01-18-10, 01:32 PM
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YOu got a fan powered unit, and they are best to be on the supply (warm) side duct, not return. If it's tight on the supply, then go with the bypass, and mount the unit on the return.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 11:20 PM
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So are the Aprilaire 700M and Carrier fan-powered or by-pass?
 
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Old 01-19-10, 06:07 AM
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The 700 is fan powered, not sure what model is the carrier?
 
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Old 01-19-10, 11:27 PM
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Not sure what model Carrier. Carrier was a brand that was suggested to me. Would the fan-powered on the supply side and the bypass on the return duct be equally effective at humidifying without mold and rust problems? And how does steam compare with them? Does one have any more benefits or disadvantages than the other?
 
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Old 01-20-10, 06:55 AM
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As long you keep the humidity level in check mold will not be an issue.

It may help cut down on the dust too since things are not dried out and throwing more dust from the carpet...

Steam use 100% of it's water to the air, but will be an added electric cost to run the heating coil to make the steam.

Bypass and fan powered flow though will not use 100% of the water (Flow though), but there is no high maint, and high electric cost of steam.

Older style bypass "Drum Style" are not used much anymore due to high maint, and risk of water over flow.

Bypass unit has less parts to worry about breaking down than a steam or fan powered unit.
 
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Old 01-20-10, 09:53 PM
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Thank you for your comments, Jay11J.
 
 

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