Window Sweat

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Old 01-30-10, 10:23 AM
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Window Sweat

We have had our Aprilaire 600 humidifier for almost a month now and I have noticed a significant difference in comfort and skin dryness. All our windows in our home are double pane with the exception of two single pane bay windows on the 1st and 2nd floor.

Our Aprilaire setting is on 6 which has a humidity ready of about 40% - 43%. The temps the past two days have been in the teens and I noticed the two single pane windows with condensation on them with a little sweat. I just lowered the setting to 4 because I was concerned about having too high humidity causing damage.

Why is my single pane windows sweating but my double pane are not? Should I have lowered my setting because the single panes have condensation. Please help. Thank you!
 
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Old 01-30-10, 10:38 AM
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I'm very surprised your double pains or not doing the same at such a high RH and cold outside temp.
 
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Old 01-30-10, 10:53 AM
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I checked all of them are not even one seems close to sweating.

Should I control the humidifier setting by watching the single pane or double pane windows?
 
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Old 01-30-10, 01:49 PM
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The double panes are just warmer as they have the air gap and extra layer of glass. The single panes are colder and the first to show condensation. Use the single as you suggested to control your setting. If the humidity gets uncomfortably low, add the shrink wrap plastic over the single pane units and you will be able to take your RH a bit higher.

You are understanding the process.
Bud
 
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Old 01-30-10, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by airman.1994 View Post
I'm very surprised your double pains or not doing the same at such a high RH and cold outside temp.
Air, a good double pane window don't sweet. I have them in our house, and our house is around 38% with outside temp of 5˚, and they are dry.

We used to have single pane and they got wet, and used the 3M plastic ti protect them till we replaced the windows last spring.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 04:47 AM
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Airman - Do you agree with Bud about adjusting the humidity setting based on the single pane window?

How long should you leave the 3M plastic shrink wrap up until it is time to replace? The 3M plastic shrink wrap in our bedroom single pane windows has been up for about 3 years.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 05:06 AM
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Yes adj the humidity setting if you don't have plastic on the window.

If the plastic is still holding in place, and the tape is sealing, then leave it be untill the tape dries out. I had plastic up on the window around our front door for 2 years, then the tape let go, so I repalced it.

On the windows that were in the bedroom, I took them down in the spring so I could open the windows.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 07:17 PM
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The tape seems to be holding in place. The only thing I noticed is that the plastic has a few wrinkles. Does that mean there is leaks? This window is high on our wall which cannot open so i can leave the plastic on all year round.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 07:45 PM
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No, you can run the hair dryer over it again to tighen it up. That what I did for the front door.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 08:46 PM
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OK! Thank you!

Is it normal for that single pane bay window on our 2nd floor bedroom to develop frost on the bottom part of the window during cold days?
 
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Old 02-01-10, 09:07 PM
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Yes, it's normal for frost to build up on cold windows, and mostly on single pane.

We been updating our windows over the years, and we got them done last spring. Our gas bill dropped, now the gas company is paying us! hehe
 
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Old 02-03-10, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeyBoy View Post
Airman - Do you agree with Bud about adjusting the humidity setting based on the single pane window?

How long should you leave the 3M plastic shrink wrap up until it is time to replace? The 3M plastic shrink wrap in our bedroom single pane windows has been up for about 3 years.
Yes I agree! My DP windows will have condensate on them above 48% RH 20 outside
 
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Old 02-04-10, 06:24 AM
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Is the frost buildup on my single pane bay window in our 2nd floor bedroom because of cold temps outside or too much humidity? I just want to make sure so I know when to higher or lower our Aprilaire 600 unit. I want to get to 40% RH with our unit but I am playing it safe due to the single pane windows. Currently, it is in the low 30%.
 
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Old 02-04-10, 07:04 AM
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Condensation and frost on those windows is tied to both the inside humidity and the outside temperature. It is the resulting interaction that occurs right at the surface of the window that creates condensation. On colder days, the condensation will occur at lower inside humidity levels. On warmer days, no condensation even at higher levels.
Here is an article on condensation, but specifically, go to the chart they reference and you will see the relationship between temperature, humidity, and different windows.
Window Condensation

Bud
 
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