Honeywell HE150 Humidifier Issues

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Old 12-22-10, 08:25 AM
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Thumbs down Honeywell HE150 Humidifier Issues

Glad to be in this forum. Had an Aprilaire in old house which ran perfectly. Wanted one in new home, contacted local HVAC contractor. He talked me into a Honeywell. I had no problem moving to this reputable brand. Contractor proceeded to take three days for this 2 hour installation. First two days, they were stumped. On third day, they got it to operate. However, water appears to only be supplied to unit intermittently. It is wired to supply humidification whenever there is a call to heat. But, when I remove the front cover, I only see water flowing sometimes. It is not a matter of the humidistat being satisfied, either, as the unit is still in humidification mode, the damper is open, and the light is green. I am not sure why no water is making it to the unit all the time while heat is being called for. The contractor has dropped out and I am working with Honeywell to find a new contractor and replace the unit, if necessary. Any feedback would be appreciated. Perhaps there are those on this board who have experienced such a "lemon" and know the cause and fix.

Thank you!

Wanted to add the contractor's faulty plumbing job handling the excess water draining from the humidifier. He ran some PVC under the humidifier and into my A/C's condensate pump. From here he utilized an abandoned clothes washer drain line. He plumbed the condensate pump drain line DIRECTLY into the abandoned washer drain line -- WITH NO AIR GAP. There is a trap in there, but from my reading this simply does not meet any local or national code. Though there is a persistent water gap in there (A/C in summer; humidifier in winter, assuming the unit is getting any water) to keep sewer gases out, a sewer line back up would backwash directly into the consensate pump line and then into everything else downstream. These guys really did a poor job and now have dropped out to move on to bigger and better things (i.e., projects that pay the big bucks). Btw, the intiial dain ran to the outside. Nice move on their part ... not! Being that we typically have winters in the
10-27 F range, that line would've frozen. Add to that other bad moves, such as securing ductwork to my gas lines, etc. really makes me wonder how many homes are filled with their defects.
 

Last edited by mjlwriter; 12-22-10 at 08:35 AM. Reason: additional facts
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Old 12-22-10, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by mjlwriter View Post
Contractor proceeded to take three days for this 2 hour installation. First two days, they were stumped. On third day, they got it to operate.
Yikes! Hope they only charged by a fixed amount than hourly?

However, water appears to only be supplied to unit intermittently.
Normal with this style of unit. It's the water saving feature.

From Honeywell's sales info.

Timer-metered solenoid wets the pad only as needed, reducing water waste by as much as 30% and saving up to 5,500 gallons of water per year.


It is wired to supply humidification whenever there is a call to heat.
That's the way I suggest with any non-steam humidifier.

But, when I remove the front cover, I only see water flowing sometimes. It is not a matter of the humidistat being satisfied, either, as the unit is still in humidification mode, the damper is open, and the light is green. I am not sure why no water is making it to the unit all the time while heat is being called for.
Again, this is normal for this style. No point of having water flowing the whole time since the pad already has water on it. This is the new thing, and I like the water saving ideal.

He plumbed the condensate pump drain line DIRECTLY into the abandoned washer drain line -- WITH NO AIR GAP.
I'd cut the whatever is used to direct seal the hose to this line. Once you got it cut out, just drop the hose into the stand pipe, and secure it. Just as if you were putting a washer hose into it.

the intiial dain ran to the outside. Nice move on their part ... not! Being that we typically have winters in the
10-27 F range, that line would've frozen.
Yeah... not a smart move! Unless want an ice rink for the kids.
 
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Old 12-22-10, 11:42 AM
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Jay, you are tops!

Your response was very clear. It seems that water only comes during the humidification cycle when some sensor "decides" there is not enough water on the pad. Makes sense, I guess, but still would rather see water constantly. This is especially so because my hygrometer reads only 32% when I have my humidistat set to 40%. In order to get that humidity % up, should I perhaps try setting my humidistat higher? Also, what is the proper amount of humidity in a home? My hygrometer has a sad face icon when it is at 32%, indicating the conditions are too dry in my house.

Regarding the plumbing, the clear plastic tube coming from the condensate pump is clamped to a short run of copper tubing which is then fed into the suspect home drain line. Where the tech installed it, he closed it up with silicone. Are you saying I should just remove the silicone and then let the copper just stay where it is? How does one remove a rather thick application of silicone?

By the way, it seems you are in the middle of Honeywell territory (in Minnesota). Based on my latest dealing with one of their people, I have developed a distaste for them. Won't mention his name, but several blogs have referred to him and not in the best light.

So, my not seeing water constantly (only intermittently) when the unit is humidifying is due to Honeywell's new "water saving" feature versus some issue with the solenoid or some wiring issue, correct? Guess this makes sense, but it baffles me why Honeywell doesn't know about this. I googled the concept using your quote from their literature and did find it. Sorry to be such a doubting Thomas, but the service from my contractor and Honeywell lately has left me quite unconfident about their product and the installation. Seems the innocent party in these situations is most always the poor homeowner...

Thanks again!
 
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Old 12-22-10, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by mjlwriter View Post
my hygrometer reads only 32% when I have my humidistat set to 40%. In order to get that humidity % up, should I perhaps try setting my humidistat higher?
I have a few questions for you.

How big is your home? Where are you out of? What are the avg temps are you having outside now? Avg run time on the furnace? Do you have an air exchanger, or fresh air tied into the return?

Also, what is the proper amount of humidity in a home? My hygrometer has a sad face icon when it is at 32%, indicating the conditions are too dry in my house.
It all depends on the outdoor temps. You don't want too much humidity in your home, and 32% is not dry. Getting down to 25% is when it is dry, but again depends on the outdoor temps. My thermostat is tied to the outdoors, and it will adj the settings.

Are you saying I should just remove the silicone and then let the copper just stay where it is? How does one remove a rather thick application of silicone?
Yes. You can pull out the glob. You may have to cut it out with a knife.

By the way, it seems you are in the middle of Honeywell territory (in Minnesota). Based on my latest dealing with one of their people, I have developed a distaste for them. Won't mention his name, but several blogs have referred to him and not in the best light.
I don't know anyone at Honeywell, so wouldn't know who it may be. sorry to hear you are having a bad taste with this. :-( Hope I can help you.

So, my not seeing water constantly (only intermittently) when the unit is humidifying is due to Honeywell's new "water saving" feature versus some issue with the solenoid or some wiring issue, correct?
This is a whole new system. and I have not seen this in action or know how long the valve is suppose to be open for. From what you've said, I'd say this is normal.

Sorry to be such a doubting Thomas, but the service from my contractor and Honeywell lately has left me quite unconfident about their product and the installation.
No need to be sorry. I'm here to help you. Seems like everything is done right, but Do you have a photo you can post on here for me to see for sure if is done right?
 
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Old 12-22-10, 05:23 PM
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Unhappy Answers to previous questions

Home size: Probably ~ 2k. I live in NJ, with pretty cold winters. Estimate the avg. temp for last month in my city is 35 degrees F. My furnace seems to run a lot in this cold weather. At one point, and it may be happening now, the furnace would run for 7 or 8 minutes, then shut off for ~ 5 minutes. This seems to be the pattern in the very cold weather. Doesn't appear to be short cycling, though this was a problem the contractor caused at one point by accidentally dislodging some sort of pressure valve... On the other hand, this kind of cycling doesn't seem all that normal, either. In really cold weather, Jay, can a furnace run 7-8 minutes, shut down for ~ 5 minutes, and then start again or is this an anomaly?

No air exchanger to my knowledge, nor do I know of any fresh air being introduced into the return. I believe we have a "closed" system wherein the air just goes in a loop out the supply ductwork and back in through returns.

By the way, I bumped up the humidistat to 45% (still within the normal range according to the dial) and am waiting to see how that affects the humidistat.

May have a plumber in to remove the silicone and lay out a drainage system where daylight is introduced to the condensate pump's drain. I don't like the current set up, with or without the silicone.

The new slogan among contractors, in contrast to the classic "The customer is always right": The homeowner is always wrong. And if he's not, make him feel that way.
 
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Old 12-22-10, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by mjlwriter View Post
My furnace seems to run a lot in this cold weather.
How many BTU is the furnace?

At one point, and it may be happening now, the furnace would run for 7 or 8 minutes, then shut off for ~ 5 minutes.
That's too short of a cycle. Furnace isn't running long enough to "hot" enough to let the humidifier do the job. What stat do you have?
 
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Old 12-23-10, 06:53 AM
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Wink

Not sure of the BTUs of furnace. Would have to take off top cover and peer inside and figure I shouldn't be messing around too much, since don't know if can count on my HVAC contractor to come on by if a wire loosens up, etc.

But that does seem to be the cycling when it is in the low 30s out and my set point is 69. I did lower it to 68 yesterday to modulate the cycling a bit and I believe it worked. Not longer run time obviously, but certainly longer down time between off and on cycles. I didn't like the short time the furnace would be off before it would cycle back on.

Don't know if I'll get to the bottom of this unless I get another HVAC contactor in in the future.

Thanks again, Jay. Your perspective and info was very helpful.

Oh, and I realized no matter what set point I designate on the humidistat, since it is tied to the call for heat, it will only run while the furnace's burner is on. It will then shut off regardless of whether the humidistat's setting is satisfied or not. Guess I'll need to be satisfied with 32% humidity instead of the 40% I am shooting for (via the humidistat)...
 
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Old 12-23-10, 07:59 AM
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What is the make/ model of the t-stat?

There is a way we can make the humidifier keep the fan on to add humidity into the air, and if we did this, hot water should be hooked up to the unit, and FYI, I tried this on mine, it seems to run a lot more to get to set point than just having it run on heat mode only.
 
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Old 12-23-10, 09:25 AM
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Lightbulb

Better that I not tinker at this point, particularly because this would require a hot water hook up and changes in the wiring that may be beyond me... Better just stick to what I have for now and wait for an experienced HVAC contractor to swing by.

Last thing, Jay. What do you make of the humidifier's drain line being fed into the condensate pump? Could the mineral content eventually clog it up?

Secondly, what do you think of the condensate pump line being plumbed directly (no daylight) into the unused washer drain. The length that it is fed in there is clamped off of a longer run of clear plastic tubing. The entry point into the unused washer drain is on the good side of a trap and is bound in with silicone. My position is that this direct plumbing job is not to code and I will be seeking help to have it drain into the same pipe but with the required daylight in between. I know the water gap is currently keeping sewer gas from coming in, but I am concerned with the potential occurrence (though low risk) of a sewer back up, in which case all of my HVAC equipment and mechanical/storage room would be compromised.

What do you say, Jay? Leave it as is or modify the manner in which the condensate line is draining?
 
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Old 12-23-10, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by mjlwriter View Post
Better that I not tinker at this point, particularly because this would require a hot water hook up and changes in the wiring that may be beyond me...
Too bad I'm not near by to help ya. But you are making a smart move just leaving it before you get yourself into a bigger mess that you don't want.

Last thing, Jay. What do you make of the humidifier's drain line being fed into the condensate pump? Could the mineral content eventually clog it up?
I've seen this done a few times, and no issues with doing that. Is the cut off switch/wire wired up to the furnace?


What do you say, Jay? Leave it as is or modify the manner in which the condensate line is draining?
I'd open it up. If you were to sell the house, they may ask to undo it.

Yes, if the sewer backed up, it would make a mess there than back up next to the furnace. But then, with the 1/2" hose, there less mess "blowing" out.
 
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Old 12-25-10, 11:24 PM
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The seal around the drain line

Ok, so I think that the drain line's orientation is okay. I believe the method described as against code is where the line is plumbed directly into the stack. Here the drain line is plumbed into a waste line separated by a trap from the stack. That leaves the silicone seal that surrounds the copper pipe extension that goes into the waste pipe as an issue. So, what would be the best and least intrusive way of getting all of that silicone out of the picture? I hope that by getting the surface material, that will be everything, but then again it probably went down into the hole the contractor drilled. What do you suggest? I probably should tackle this rather than leave it be.

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-26-10, 07:20 AM
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Maybe take a knife, and go around the pipe to cut the silicone and then try pulling it out.. Lot of time they pull out with some elbow work.

I'm still waiting to hear back from you what's your stat make/model. We may be able to adjust it to make the furnace run longer.
 
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Old 12-26-10, 11:51 AM
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Thermostat is a Honeywell. Not sure what model it is, but it is programmable. I think the furnace runs the way it does is just due to the thermostat being satisfied then requiring more heat to achieve the set point. In other words, I think it is running okay as is but is dealing with not the tightest house and in cold conditions. However, could you tell me generically what the concept is. If it entails messing with the wiring, I would be inclined to once again leave it to the professionals.

Regarding the removal of the silicone, that sounds like a sound approach. But perhaps I would get into a bind and then... So, probably will go with a HVAC contractor who also has a plumbing license. Then he can assess all and also take care of the silicone at the same time.
 
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Old 12-27-10, 06:28 AM
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Sounds like the stat is left at default cycle per hour of 5. that is cycles on and off fast and short. Many people/dealer does not adj the CPH. Is the stat a retail model that you put in or a dealer/Pro model?

Can you take a photo of it and post it here for me to see it?
 
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Old 12-27-10, 08:46 AM
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Here is a URL that will take you to the photo of the stat. Is the method by which you alter the CPH via wiring or programming. We are in the middle of an snow storm, with horrible conditions. I wouldn't want to mess with wiring, esp. b/c I am w/o an HVAC contractor right now.

But, if it's programming related, I might give it a shot. What is it you're proposing? Migrating from the 7 minutes on, 5 minutes off to something like 10 minutes on, 8 minutes off?

Also, I'm supplying a drawing from Honeywell that describes the method by which you are to drain the humidifier. It looks like there should be a connection like the one my contractor did (directly into the downstream portion of a wet trap, that is, away from the stack) and they even say that all connections downstream from the humidifier should be sealed, so it sounds as if the silicone is sound. According to this description, I should be fine as is...

Would like to still know how I can have my humidistat set point be satisfied. Still only at 31-32%, so if you think running my furnace longer would do the trick, I'd be interested. Wouldn't this increase my gas bill significantly, though?

 
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Old 12-27-10, 08:51 AM
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Red face Hmmm, don't see my photos

... So here are just the URLs:

Drawing of humidifier draining options:
http://www.forwardthinking.honeywell.../69_2413ef.pdf
See marked p. 25 of material (this is Appendix B; p. 27 of 60 within .pdf file)

Photo of thermostat:

Pictures from Sprint: View Message

Btw, didn't see a way to just attach images. That's why I attached URL links. Where is the attach button for including images?

Thank you,
Michael
 

Last edited by mjlwriter; 12-27-10 at 08:56 AM. Reason: Clarification
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Old 12-27-10, 10:00 AM
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Here is the manual on the model close to yours.

Take a coin on the bottom to snap the stat off the base plate.

on back of the stat there is either dip switch or screws you turn. Set it up to "Hot water/High eff" that will give a longer run time to allow the furnace to warm up and the humidifier has hotter air to do the job.

There will be no or maybe better fuel saving with this. Longer run time leads to better thermo mass transfer once the furnace has a chance to warm up.

The image button is the 3rd from the left on the tool bar.
 
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Old 12-27-10, 07:29 PM
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Took a good look at your description and was contemplating pulling the thermostat off the base to see if could make that adjustment, then realized:

My furnace is neither a hot water nor high efficiency furnace. Wouldn't this change of setting be improper for my furnace. I think I understand the premise: allow the furnace to prepare longer to supply the warm air, so as to provide warmer air to the house, warmer air to the humidifier, and facilitate longer breaks between off and on.

However, is this switch appropriate for a <90% efficiency furnace, such as the one I suspect I have?
 
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Old 12-27-10, 08:36 PM
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Even if you don't have a 90%, go ahead and switch it over to it. I tell everyone on here to set it to 3 no matter what they have.
 
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Old 12-28-10, 07:41 AM
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Could it have any ill effects. If you haven't been able to tell, I am super conservative. Also, where would I pry open the stat from the backing plate with a coin. No real spot that I see where I'd do that.

Last, will I see exactly the picture that is in the manual you sent me. Will it be a DIP switch or something to turn? Please advise
 
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Old 12-28-10, 07:53 AM
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With the longer run time, it will be more efficiency. The furnace has a chance to warm up (about 15 minutes) to it's steady state of efficiency.

An example in my home, I have a two stage furnace. 1st stage pretty much runs non-stop when it's 0˚ outside. Once we get down to -15˚ or so then 2nd stage starts firing off. My gas usage is much lower than my old single stage.

You may have to grasp lower part of the stat and pull forward if there no slot for the coin. Since I don't know what model of stat you have (we will see printed on back of the stat once you get it off the wall) so not sure what you have off hand for set up. (Switch or screws)
 
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Old 12-28-10, 08:01 AM
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Red face

I seem to remember pulling it off once w/o a coin, so it probably comes down to doing that. In terms of the model number, perhaps I can get that from the inside of the battery compartment. I believe that information is in there. Rather get you the exact model number before I monkey around with stuff. Whatever the orientation, I'd like to get explicit instructions from you before I pull the stat off. If it's a DIP switch, want to know where it is exactly and in what position it needs to go. If it's screws, I guess I'd need to loosen the screw and switch the wire over and snug up. I'll reach out to you as soon as I get the model number. Are you open to a phone call (me to you? you to me? whatever you want...).

Also, and please don't take this the wrong way, is this "fix" something that can have any adverse effect. I suspect I have a single stage furnace; I have done no tinkering with the switches or wires since this was installed by my HVAC contractor. In terms of whether we acquired the stat or the contractor supplied, I don't remember definitively.
 
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Old 12-28-10, 12:21 PM
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I've never seen a model # on the battery area before. Get back to me when you find out, and I'll help ya when you are ready.

Sorry, I don't do phone due to my hearing.
 
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Old 12-28-10, 12:43 PM
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ok, will check things out this afternoon and write back to you.

thanks!
 
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Old 12-28-10, 04:50 PM
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Red face

DIP Switches are now: OFF, ON, and ON (1,2,3, respectively). I have the confidence in how you were guiding me, but not the know how. So, I had a Honeywell rep walk me through removing the stat from the wall, and identifying where the DIP switches were, etc.

Thank you for the excellent suggestion. As we speak, furnace has not yet come back on, but I am looking forward to seeing how it cycles and whether this will allow my humidifier to satisfies it's humidistat and my hygrometer...

One thing I am not understanding, though, is this: Isn't the stat's set point the sole determining factor which dictates the relationship between the stat and the furnace. That is, when the temp dips below the stat's set point it calls for heat. Next, when the stat's set point is satisfied, the furnace is instructed to shut off. Bottom line: What will this adjustment with the DIP switch cause and what, ultimately, will this accomplish?

Furnace just kicked on. Hoping for good things!

Thank you,
Michael
 
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Old 12-28-10, 05:28 PM
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Honeywell does not do the "Swing" like most other and old style do.. They learn the temp changes in your home, and puts it into cycles per hour. It may take a day or so for it to learn your home.

They provide a better comfort in your home with out the swing, and it's pretty complex how it works. I will find the info on they work once I'm done making supper.

Glad to help you out so far.
 
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Old 12-28-10, 05:58 PM
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Yes, anything you provide would be appreciated. I'd be particularly interested in learning more about how the DIP switch change I made could affect my home's heating and humidifying. Also, I think I remember you saying the change would have no effect on my heating bill, or could even help it? Do I recall correctly? Would hate for my bill to go up...

Look forward to your next response.
 
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Old 12-28-10, 06:05 PM
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The dip switch changes is changing the CPH. Did you find the model # on it?

Here is the detail.


 
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Old 12-28-10, 09:06 PM
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Yes, it was actually in the battery compartment. It is T8112D1005. If that is not the recognizable model number, then the model number is imbedded in there somehow. The folks at Honeywell recognized my stat by that number. There was nothing on the back of the stat that I saw in terms of the model number...

It's been several hours since I made the DIP switch adjustment and so far no change in the hygrometer setting. But either you, or I read this, detailed that the associated change(s) could take a while while the stat and its programming take effect after taking in various data.

Intend to leave the new setting as is. Now that you have my model number, what do you expect to happen over the next several days? Do you expect the hygrometer humidity percentage to move up from its typical 31-32% to the humidistat setting of 45% (still have it there from when I was attempting to push the hygrometer reading higher)? Really want to to just set it to 40% and achieve that. I believe 35-40% humidity is ideal. Where I'm at (31%) is too dry...

Also, is there a difference between humidity and relative humidity? My hygrometer measures relative humidity. Is it's reading in relative humidity appropriate for measuring the humidity level as set on the humidistat -- or are these apples and oranges?
 
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Old 12-29-10, 06:00 AM
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Honeywell had a lot of style like that, but they were not the same model#, once I looked it up, you got it set right.

Are you noticing longer run time now?

My home's humidity read the same on 3 of my weather stations as they do on my t-stat.
 
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Old 12-29-10, 07:10 AM
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Question

Yes, longer run time for furnace after the DIP switch change. But as of this morning, no change in hygrometer read out. Nothing to compare it to, except the humidistat setting, which I've left at 45%. Hoping to at least get 35-40% humidity in the house, as measured by my hygrometer, with the longer furnace run time, but not happening thus far...

Humidistat set to 45%
Hygrometer still reads 31-32%

Any thoughts?

One thought is maybe I'm comparing apples to oranges because:

My hygrometer measures relative humidity... Is this comparable to the humidistat setting (or is that just a humidity setting, different somehow from relative humidity)?
 
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Old 12-29-10, 07:31 AM
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Take your hygrometer outside, and see what reading you are getting and see what your local weather webpage or station are saying?

Maybe this may help?
 
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Old 12-29-10, 09:05 AM
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Thumbs up Your input has been invaluable...

Thanks.

I think this part says it best:

"Humidity has units (mass/volume) but relative humidity is just a fraction or percentage."

Both my hygrometer and the humidistat measure in % and are concerned with the % of humidity in the air at that moment.

So, I guess it's apples to apples. Must be the looseness of my house's insulation, build, etc. that is not allowing the RH to be > 32-32%. However, the longer cycle has only been in effect for less than a day. Maybe the relative humidity takes a while to increase and this will eventually be facilitated by the longer run cycles. I liked your explanation of why the longer run cycle is better, but didn't quite get it. You referred to better therm mass transfer or something like that. I'll take note of the hygrometer's reading when I get home and also as the days go by.

I can also take the hygrometer outside and do the test you noted or perhaps exchange the hygrometer for a different one that could be more accurate.

Thanks Jay!

Btw: Your input about the water-saving feature on the humidifier was sanity saving for me -- and the tip about altering the cycling on the furnace via DIP switch was great. All your other feedback has been very helpful, too. I can only imagine your skills in the field! What may I ask is your profession? Are you a professional HVAC moderator or is this just your "charity" to us hapless homeowners?

Regarding the plumbing from the condensate pump to my home plumbing that I am not happy with, I found what appears to be a great site for indirect plumbing connections (via an air gap). Here it is: Welcome to Air Gap International, Inc.
 
  #34  
Old 12-29-10, 09:34 AM
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It may take some time, all dpends on the home.. Lots of wood or hardwood floors, and ect.

One way of putting on the long run time.. Say driving your car getting to point A to B. Are you going to save gas on the stop and go at the stop light, or longer steady speed?

I went to college for HVAC in 1990 after I got out of High School. It a two year program, and we also cover major appliance repair. After I got out of college, I went into the HVAC field, and loved it.. I had good results, and feed back. At the end of a year being there, I end up being the one and ONLY service tech. (started off with 3 of us) I was getting to a point of not having a life of being on call 24/7, and was before cell phones, so I had to depend the pager, and was lot of range in many area. After 2 years, I got out and needed a break. At that time my grandmother was ill with cancer, and felt I should move back to my hometown to help my grandparents. I worked at the grocery store, and was moved up to produce and assist store manager. I keep the system going at the store, and other maint work there.

After 8 years at the store, kinda got tired of the small store and moved onto something bigger. I'm now at Home Depot as a kitchen designer, and appliance sales. I am here to help people like you out, and enjoy doing this from the comfort of my home. There are times I thought of going back into the field again, but with this economy, kinda hard to get into it for now.
 
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Old 12-29-10, 11:48 AM
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Good description. I imagine the longer cycle will suit me well. And regarding satisfying the humidistat, I'll just be patient and see how it goes.

Thanks again, Jay. I will surely save your site and refer people to it should they have questions. And I will save it, too, as questions always arise.

I'm sure you design magnifiscent kitchens @ HD.

Best,
Michael
 
  #36  
Old 01-01-11, 05:30 PM
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Unhappy HE150 Not Powering On

Jay,

New issue. When stat calls for heat and furnace goes on, the humidifier does not power on -- though the damper is still in the "on" position.

The only thing I've done is turn off the emergency shut off switch in the basement so that I could check out the saddle valve (to make sure it was fully open). Switch is back to on...

I don't think adjusting the DIP switch had any effect, as I'm pretty sure I've gone down to check the humidifier's operation since I made that change.

Could my having flipped the emergency switch off then on have altered anything that would make the humidifier inoperational? The humidifier is powered through some sort of transformer hard wired to the furnace... Is there any reason that it would now not be getting power?

Any advice? Will go down to the basement a little later to see how things are operating.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-01-11, 08:07 PM
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Turning the power off should not have any affect on this.
 
  #38  
Old 01-01-11, 09:08 PM
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Red face All's good now

My theory of what happened:

I believe the saddle valve was not open all the way. I fully turned it counter clockwise. This now allowed the correct flow of water to be released into the feed tube and onto the pad, thereby finally satisfying the humidistat. Thus, when I observed the furnace turn on and not the humidifier, it was because the humidistat was still satisfied. Upon my turning the humidistat up, the humidifier came on.

All I know is it's working but seemingly still only at a higher humidistat setting (becuase the humidity is still probably above 40%). I have the saddle valve all the way open and now the humidistat's back on 40.

Will randomly go down to basement over the next couple of days to make sure the humidifier comes on at least some of the time at this humidistat setting.

Also will look into finding a more reliable hygrometer.

Thoughts?
 
 

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