whole house humidifier with radiant heat

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Old 01-27-11, 04:19 PM
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whole house humidifier with radiant heat

Hello, my problem is I have a 2 story 2500sq' home with randiant throughout and central a/c 1 unit in attic 1 unit in basement both are variable speed. the RH doesnt get above 23% I'm looking to get the honeywell true steam for the blower thats in the basement will this work? I would like to use my ductwork instead of a stand alone unit.thanks any advice would be helpful. And i live in NY if that matters any.
 
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Old 01-27-11, 04:40 PM
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You can do that. The steam unit will be best with this set up since there is no hot air to help with the water evaporation.

How old is the house?
 
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Old 01-27-11, 06:12 PM
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ok thanks. house is 3 years old
 
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Old 01-27-11, 08:13 PM
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Wow, a house that new, and you are that dry? Do you have an air exchanger (HRV) system?
 
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Old 01-29-11, 06:38 PM
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no i dont have an hrv. do i need one? my attic is vented i thought you have to have a tight house to have one.what do you think is causing it to be so dry?
 
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Old 01-29-11, 06:54 PM
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A relative humidity reading of 23% is what you get when you take outside winter air and warm it up to room temperature. That is happening, my guess, because the house is far from too tight and that is strange considering the age. I would expect something big has been overlooked and is allowing a lot of air to leak out, thus pulling a lot of replacement air back in.

Around your chimney, plumbing, bath tub, shower, can lights, overhangs, drop over kitchen cabinets are a few. This web site (slow to open) will help. http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/ste...ide_062507.pdf

As a reference, a normal house will still exchange all of its air every couple of hours. A tight house may go 3 to 4 hours. When you get into the 4 hour range (0.25 air changes per hour) there should be a HRV or up north ERV.

The good news is, if you resolve the air leakage, you will improve your humidity levels and reduce your heating/ac costs. Worth a shot.

Bud
 

Last edited by Bud9051; 01-29-11 at 06:56 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 01-30-11, 06:05 AM
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I agree with Bud.

I am shocked to see you have that kind of reading in a newer home, and along with the in floor heat.
 
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Old 01-30-11, 05:47 PM
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thanks for the insight i do have a fireplace all my high hats are ic rated with r-30 insulation in attic. i'll try t find where i have a leak but there is no signs of drafts any where in my house.should i change my vented soffits to non vented? i think i saw somewhere that having r-30 in attic there's no need to have vented soffits i could be wrong though.
 
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Old 01-30-11, 07:36 PM
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All attic should be vented.

Get an energy audit on your home.
 
 

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