LG dehumidifier not doing job?

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Old 05-29-15, 03:55 AM
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LG dehumidifier not doing job?

We have an LG dehumidifier that has not been very reliable. It had control board replaced under warranty and then froze up and was replaced about 1 1/2 years ago. It is a 70 pint/day dehumidifer.

In our new house, we have it running down basement and is set for 55%. The basement is reading 70% humidity on humidity monitor. It is not a particularly wet or damp basement.

The dehumidifier runs constantly and air is warm. I pulled water bucket out after 2 days, and it had about an inch or 2 of water in it. If it is capable of pulling 70 pts of water per day out of air and is running nonstop, shouldn't I expect water bucket to have much more water in it after a couple days?

Thanks
Dave
 
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Old 05-29-15, 04:22 AM
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Top 38 Complaints and Reviews about LG Dehumidifier

According to all the complaints on that ^^ site, yours is in great shape. What model do you have?
 
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Old 05-29-15, 05:23 AM
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I have LHD659EBL. Theorectically, shouldn't a dehumidifier running continuously pull out the amount of moisture per day that it is rated for? So a 45 pt would extract 45 pts if running nomnstop? I am going to sh**can this one. We have a 2400 sf basement with 8' ceiling (unfinished). Again, not particularly damp. Would a 50 pt per day suffice, or should I get a 70? Thanks again
 
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Old 05-29-15, 08:12 AM
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So a 45 pt would extract 45 pts if running nonstop?
No. The unit will extract up to 45 pints per day. It depends on the amount of moisture in the air and the temperature.
 
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Old 05-29-15, 09:12 AM
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Temp yesterday was 64 degrees. Humidity was 70%. Dehumidifier was running nonstop. Did not make much water. When I checked later, RH was 68%
 
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Old 05-29-15, 09:41 AM
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Part of the problem is the incoming outside air. 75 outside air at 60% RH has a dew point of 60.18. Once that air leaks into the basement and cools to 65 its RH goes up to 84% That is more like the number your system is starting with.

As for air leakage, ALL houses replace ALL of their inside air every 3 hours or sooner. The exceptions are extremely tight homes built for less air exchange, but equipped with fans to make up the difference.

What concerns me though is the lack of water being extracted and that sounds like that machine either can't function at 64 or isn't working right. If you plan on running the dehumidifier during colder weather, look for one rated for lower temps.

Air leakage is always an issue where the house sit on the foundation. Reducing the leakage will help.

Also, monitor the RH and the temp in the basement as well as the RH and temp outside.
Here is a calculator to play with.
Temperature, Dewpoint, and Relative Humidity Calculator

Bud
 
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Old 05-29-15, 10:44 AM
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I have a sensor in basement. It said temp 64 and RH 70. Decreased to RH of 68 after running for hours.
 
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Old 05-29-15, 11:55 AM
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I'm just getting technical here, but "reduced it to 68 after running for hours" still needs the associated temperature. A dehumidifier actually increases the temperature as it has no way to vent like an air conditioner.

Starting at 64 and 70% RH, if the temp increased by just one degree the RH would fall to 68% with no water being removed. That would say it did nothing. But if the temp decreased by 1 and the RH dropped 2 points, then you made a little more progress.

Always compare the dew points, or use the dew point with another measure number to get the third.

But
 
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Old 05-29-15, 12:26 PM
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Sorry. Temp stayed the same (64). Humidity went from 70 to 68
 
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Old 05-29-15, 01:40 PM
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If you have already decided to replace the machine, make sure that whatever you buy has a good return policy. I'm not recommending Home Depot but they have a good return policy.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 02:05 PM
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Just an update. I tossed the LG and bought a Frigidaire 70 pint dehumidifier. Within about 12 hours, the relative humidity in the basement went from 66 to 55.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 04:12 PM
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Thanks for the update and good decision. I assume the output increased substantially?

Bud
 
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Old 06-04-15, 02:30 PM
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I assume so, but it goes to a shoebox pump.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 04:39 AM
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a 70 pint dehumidifier at 64 degrees would probably only pull out around 55 pints a day.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 07:55 AM
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Update: when I started dehumidifier last Tues, humidity in 2400 SF basement was 66%. Over the weekend, it was 49%.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 08:19 AM
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Just a little related discussion. We often get posters who claim their basements are dry and refuse to accept that concrete walls and floor can be passing very much moisture. Can you tell us about your basement? Does it seem otherwise dry, no streams flowing through or persistent wet spots?

Using Airman's 55 pints per day, you would be removing over 8 gallons of water per day. If you could direct your outflow into a 5 gallon bucket for some period of time to give us (me) an idea as to how much you are actually seeing it would be interesting. But whatever it is removing your numbers are looking much better.

Bud
 
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Old 06-08-15, 08:55 AM
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Basement never has water but seemed humid lately. Will put hose in bucket to see what we get
 
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Old 06-09-15, 05:22 AM
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Remember as your basement gets drier it will be harder to remove that moisture so it will most likely be even less.
 
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