Basement humidity: What do I do?

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Old 07-19-15, 06:44 PM
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Basement humidity: What do I do?

Hello,

I am finishing a basement and it is a bit too humid down there some of the time. The last time I finished a basement it was 10 years ago and the dehumidifier I used was in a closet with the front exposed into the room and a drain inside the closet. The thing made a lot of heat but it was all contained within the closet.

10 years later..do dehumidifiers on the market now generate less heat or should I expect the same thing?

If that is the case, I may want to do the same thing and put the dehumidifier inside a mechanical room but cut a hole in the wall so the front of the unit faces out into the room but the heat stays inside the closet.

Inside the mechanical room, there is a condensate pump that I could drain the condensed water from the dehumidifier into, but it is already in use and I do not want it to burn out from overuse. There are 2 AC units currently draining into it. I assume it would be too much of a load to add in the dehumidifier?

If that is the case, I could drill a hole through the concrete slab down into the crushed stone and let the thing drain down into there.

Or, if dehumidifiers nowadays do not throw as much heat as the older ones I'm thinking of, I could just put it in the corner of the room and drill down and let it drain out under the concrete.


What's the best option?
 
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Old 07-19-15, 07:19 PM
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Unfortunately due to physics they must give off heat. The newer models may give off slightly less heat but still a considerable amount.

A dehumidifier is nothing more than an air conditioner. Do you have a window you can put a small window A/C in ? You'll get cool air and dehumidification.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 07:30 PM
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Yes, but there is already AC down there and it is plenty cool. Just a bit too humid is all. Do you think I'd be better off running the condensation into the condensate pump (already drains 2 A/C units, not sure if that would be too much of a burden on it) or just go under the slab into the crushed stone?

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 07:38 PM
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Your moisture is already likely coming from the slab. So don't put the water back under it. The heat the dehumidifier puts out is the dryed air so you want that back into the space. Maybe look into a ductable unit.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 07:41 PM
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If the area is already cooled then a small humidifier should work good for you.
Like airman said.... get rid of the water.

You can have it go into the condensate pump but make sure you clean that out every year. You don't want it to fail and overflow.
 
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Old 07-20-15, 04:53 AM
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The pump runs probably once every 10 minutes. There are 2 AC units draining into it now, and I think a third thing, especially a dehumidifier, might just be too much of a load. If it did burn out, there would be water everywhere. It does not seem to be worth the risk.

The house is on a cliff and the water table is 70 feet below the ground at the bottom, so virtually no water table problems.

I'm more concerned about the inherent heat that the unit will throw. If it makes the room less humid but makes it hotter, that won't work. I figured 10 years later, the units they sell now must be much more efficient, but I guess physics has it so no matter what, it produces heat. If that is the case, I'll probably put it in the closet and cut an opening for it to face out into the room, but the heat will be contained within the closet. I did that 10 years ago and it worked great, except I had a drain then.

It seems to be with consumer utility pumps there are either the standard condensate pumps or plain sump pumps, and nothing in between.

What if I added another condensate pump for the dehumidifier, and spliced the line onto the line coming out of the other pump? That might screw up the pressure/vaccum in the line though.

I don't know.
 
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Old 07-24-15, 10:35 AM
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If you're positioning the unit with the suction side (usually nicer looking) facing the room and blowing the warm dry air into a closet, you're not really dehumidifying the living space. You're just filling up a closet with warm dry air. You need to circulate the living space air through the unit and back into the living space, not into a closet. You might find that when it's circulating correctly that it dries the space out faster and doesn't run as much, resulting in less heat.

I have a small unit in the basement, house has central air. The unit runs on about a 50% duty cycle and my basement is always nice and cool.
 
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Old 07-24-15, 07:27 PM
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I have a basement that is very cool and I also run a dehumidifier. Since the basement is cool I don't notice the dehumidifier creating much heat and it doesn't run too often either.
 
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