which dehumidifier to buy and why

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Old 07-16-16, 06:11 AM
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which dehumidifier to buy and why

I just found out that i can help my poor ac by buying dehumidifier. I have 1200sq ft. My townhouse has basement but ut is always cool and i barely use it because it is storage not living area. We live mainly in living room and kitchen because 2 bedrooms upstairs are always too hot too humid. Our ac cant cool down house too good. Ac is set to 74F and it barely stops working. Electricity bill is high now $150.
So if it is really true that dehimidifier would take away himidity then ac could faster and economically cool down house then i would be extremally happy. I found dehumidifiers in costco for $200.
40 Pint, For Rooms up to 2500 Sq Ft, Energy Star Rated
Is this something good for me?
Should i buy more expensive units? How many pints? Sq ft same as my house or much bigger? Where should i put it? In living room? In basement? Upstairs?
Please advise...
 
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Old 07-16-16, 07:31 AM
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While it is true that your air conditioner consumes a lot of energy to remove moisture from the air, I think your money would be better spent making sure your A/C is working properly at peak efficiency.

A dehumidifier does remove water from the air but in the process it adds heat to the air and it use significant electricity in the process. So it lessens the humidity load on the A/C but increases the heat load on the A/C, all while increasing your electric bill.

I honestly don't know whether the reduction in humidity load would offset the added heat load, but I doubt it would result in a savings on electricity or in much overall improvement.

Your first step should be to make sure your air conditioner is working as well as it can. That means making sure the filter is clean. Have a tech check the indoor and outdoor coils and clean if necessary. The same tech can check the refrigerant level to make sure it is optimum, and adjust blower speeds if needed.

Anything you can do to minimize air leakage around windows and doors would help too. And don't open windows at night if the outside air is humid as the A/C will have to remove that moisture the next day.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 07:52 AM
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Other things to check is leaks in the ducts, uninsulated ducts, dirty coil.
Not enough insulation, attic and basement where never air sealed before insulation was installed, improperly installed insulation that's blocking the soffit vents, not enough roof venting.
No return air vent on the second floor.
Poor windows, not keeping the blinds closed on the sunny side of the home.
https://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm...sulation_table
Ever put your hand near the back side of a running window A/C unit and felt how hot it gets, that's what will happen with a dehumidifier running.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 09:19 AM
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I honestly don't know whether the reduction in humidity load would offset the added heat load, but I doubt it would result in a savings on electricity or in much overall improvement.
There would be no improvement using a dehumidifier. The added heat load would negate any positive effects..... plus the additional electrical cost.

This is one reason we don't keep two threads running on a similar topic...... all the same questions get asked again.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 09:13 AM
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Also, keep in mind that a properly sized AC unit should run 100% of the time when conditions are at their worst. A larger unit would cool faster but cycle more often which will use more energy and shorten equipment life. This is according to the experts anyway, which I myself am not.
 
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Old 07-20-16, 04:34 PM
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I like to keep things separated. Sorry about that.
So what is the reason to buy humidifier? At least in my region...?
I found multiple website with people stating it does work.
 
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Old 07-21-16, 07:49 AM
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I have a dehumidifier in the basement because I refuse to open enough vents down there for the AC to dehumidify the space because it would then be too cold for me.

In other words, it allows me more control over the environment.
 
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Old 07-21-16, 12:17 PM
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In green grass states every basement will benefit from a dehumidifier. Nobody has said anything about no load times. Dehumidifier is a must then. Dehumidifiers are sized at 80 degrees so at 65 a 40 pint dehumidifier might only remove 20 pints. So get the biggest you can get.
 
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Old 07-21-16, 01:50 PM
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If basement doesn't have a/c put a dehumidifier down there to control the humidity and possible mold/mildew. Per my a/c tech the max temp difference between inside and outside is 15 degrees. Try 75 degrees and see how you feel. Can also supplement a/c with fans. The theory is/was that an oversized a/c unit will cool the house faster but won't get the humidity down as well as a properly sized unit.....too big is probably better than too small as far as a/c unit sizes are concerned.
 
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Old 07-21-16, 02:06 PM
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We dont really use basement yet. It is unfinished without ceilling drywalls and only sidewalls are done. Anyway i have to remove every drywall for my village inspector(different thread). So our basement is our storage and my computer office once in a while. It is really cold and there is only 1 vent which is always closed. At this point in my life i cant afford adding dehimidifier in itto remove moisture which of course i believe it has. So im guessing until my kids will get older then we wont use this space at all... Beside collecting "garbage".
 
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Old 07-21-16, 02:36 PM
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If you have hardwood floors on the floor above the basement it is important to keep basement humidity low. Might be a good idea to open the basement a/c vent when it's really humid. Too much humidity in the basement could damage whatever you are storing down there. Where are you located?
 
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Old 07-21-16, 02:42 PM
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I live close to Chicago IL.
I have laminated flooring in kitchen and living room. We have hardwood floor on stairs to second level and it its bedrooms.
Is there a easy way to check humidity level? Maybe i dont need dehumidifier.
 
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Old 07-22-16, 11:35 AM
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you can pick up a RH gauge almost anywhere. Hardware store, wallmart etc etc.
 
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