Consider installing whole house humidifier....

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Old 11-23-16, 08:10 PM
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Consider installing whole house humidifier....

Have forced air heat and I want to install whole house humidifier....Just started to do some research on the internet about various types and reviews and I like the idea behind the Drainless humidifiers but a bit concerned....especially about the fact that water collects and stays inside the unit until fully evaporated...which an lead to bacterial growth.

What would you guys recommend in terms of technology ? Bypass ? Flow through ?

Thanks !
 
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Old 11-23-16, 09:41 PM
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I like, use and recommend the Aprilaire line of bypass humidifiers.
They do have a drain which allows the excess minerals to be washed away.
 
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Old 11-24-16, 04:33 AM
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Hi Paul,
When someone is looking to add a humidifier I often like to point out that low humidity is the result of excess outside air. That outside air is dry and due to air leakage or duct leakage your air exchange is too high. Two things will happen if you do some air sealing, the humidity level will rise and your heating costs will fall.

The desired air exchange replaces all inside air every 3 to 4 hours. The low humidity is telling us your home is replacing all of the inside air on an average of every 2 to 3 hours, very common.

Some homes built tighter than the every 3 to 4 hours exchange have to run a dehumidifier. The target range is that 3 to 4 and very little additional humidity will be needed.

Bud
 
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Old 12-03-16, 11:45 AM
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any other suggestions and tips before I buy and install it.... ? I have actually improve on the insulation and sealing gaps etc... I am sure the house is still leaking air but it is a good improvement over what it was when I moved in two yrs ago.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 12:33 PM
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You could purchase an accurate humidity meter and check your house in several locations before making a permanent decision.

I have an Aprilaire bypass unit. My home was built in the late 50's so I know I have some leakage. I use the humidifier sparingly. I raise the humidity a percent or two mostly to keep the static charges under control. I don't shoot for unrealistic humidity levels.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 01:01 PM
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I agree with PJ, a meter will tell you where you are and help you decide if you even need a humidifier. If you end up purchasing a humidifier then that meter and base reading will tell you how well it is working.

Bud
 
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Old 12-06-16, 03:35 PM
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I am at 30% humidity in most rooms...not much difference throughout the house.
That's considered dry ...maybe even very dry
 
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Old 12-06-16, 04:09 PM
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A customer of mine was having condensation issues with his name brand windows. When he contacted them they said he needed to get his humidity below 35% and see if the condensation continued. In winter, 45% is ok but above 50% may be getting in trouble.

I just pulled up the humidity in Point Pleasant, 46 and 88% RH. Bring that air inside and warm it to 70 and you get an RH of 37%. To know how your home and its occupants are contributing to your humidity level you need to know what is happening outside since your house will replace ALL of its inside air every 3 to 4 hours.
Temperature, Dewpoint, and Relative Humidity Calculator

Not really trying to talk you out of the humidifier, but it is nice when the house maintains a comfortable level without the expense and maintenance of a new system.

Bud
 
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Old 12-09-16, 06:54 AM
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Not sure about the relationship between Dew Point and Humidity....however, I and everyone else are in agreement that the air feels very dry in my house.
I have a few high quality digital meters that I borrowed from my friend who works in pharma so they are calibrated and have memory functions.
When the temp outside drops to below 40F and the heat comes on to keep the house in the 68-70F, the air becomes dry and the humidity drops to about 30%

When the days are nicer (in the 50s) the air feels very comfortable and is in the 50s% RH...and never any issues with condensation etc....

I guess I want to move the needle up from the low of 30%RH to about 40% during the cold months when the heat is on and pumping hot dry air
 
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