Installing Aprilaire 500 in Condo - Need Some Installation Advice

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Old 02-28-18, 12:40 PM
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Installing Aprilaire 500 in Condo - Need Some Installation Advice

I just moved into a condo (1400sf), and I am thinking about installing an Aprilaire 500. I know that in ideal conditions, I wouldn't need one. I have to work on reducing some of the draftiness. My concern is that I'm going to be installing solid hardwood floors, and I don't want to have issues from the low humidity. My goal is to use the unit with either a Nest or Ecobee thermostat (not sure which one to buy). I wanted to see if I could get some advice before I attempt the install. I haven't purchased the unit yet, so if I should get something different, I am open to any suggestions.

I suspect that this will be a more challenging project for me, but I really would like the satisfaction of doing this myself.

1. From the initial reading that I've done, I understand that it's a bad idea to use a saddle valve. I was going to use a Sharkbite compression fitting off of the hot water supply. From there, I thought maybe I would use a braided stainless connection instead of plastic. I could also use copper tubing if that's better. I'm just afraid of kinking it.

2. Can anyone suggest the best location to install the unit? I've attached pictures of my HVAC system.

3. What is the best way to pipe the drain? I wasn't sure if I should tap in to the PVC somewhere with a tee, or if there is a better way to do it.

4. Is it better to use rigid duct for the bypass instead of some type of semi-rigid duct? Is there a particular gauge that I should buy? I will tape all of the joints.

5. Any suggestions for how to cut a clean hole in the duct when placing the humidifier. I was thinking that I would drill a small starter hole and then use tin snips to cut out the square. If there is a better way, please let me know.

I appreciate any suggestions/advice.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 01:06 PM
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The Aprilaire 500 would be a good choice.

A location above the A coil and where you can conveniently connect the bypass line to the return duct.

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1) copper is a good choice. You would use the soft rolled type 1/4" copper. A short flex line is also ok for there.

2) as illustrated

3) You could tee into the A/C drain line. Need to see where it goes.

4) I like using rigid duct work with the swivel type 90.

5) Drill a hole and use tin snips is the best way to cut it out.
 
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Old 03-01-18, 01:56 PM
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I definitely need help with figuring out how to drain the humidifier. There is a Little Giant Condensate Pump on the floor. The AC drain line runs to this pump. From there, there is a clear tubular plastic line that is inserted into PVC drain pipe. You can see it in the pictures below. It's to the left of the PVC exhaust vent. I can't tell where the PVC drain runs, other than I see it exit through the side of my wall. I'm sorry if this is a dumb question, but what is the purpose of the condensate removal pump. Does it have anything to do with my unit being on the 2nd floor? How should I drain the humidifier?

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Last edited by PJmax; 03-01-18 at 10:57 PM. Reason: enhanced/labeled pictures
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Old 03-01-18, 11:29 PM
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A = drain line B = furnace condensate C = A/C condensate

A condensate pump is a necessary evil when the drain line is above the water or condensate source. Anything that drains into it needs to be shutoff automatically in case of pump failure and overflow. That means the A/C and the furnace would shutdown on an overflow.

You have an additional problem and that's if your drain line going into the wall gets clogged.... you'll have water everywhere when the pump runs. You don't have a drip pan under the furnace either.

It looks like the A/C line should go directly into the drain line, There is no need to have it pumped out. I would connect the A/C condensate line back into the drain line with a tee. The cond pump and the humidifier can both go into the top of the tee.

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Old 03-08-18, 08:13 AM
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This should be my last question, hopefully. What should I use to connect the bypass to the return duct? I bought a Take Off and a Starting Collar. The take off has an adhesive strip and holes to screw into the duct, while the starting collar has "teeth" that fold backwards against the duct. I'm not sure which is correct for my application. Thank you again for all of your help. Here is a picture of what I bought:
 
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Old 03-08-18, 09:11 AM
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I usually use the top fitting where the fingers are bent over to hold it. The bottom may also work but I think it's supposed to be mounted from the inside out.
 
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Old 03-08-18, 10:06 AM
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I think that bottom take off is made for duct-board.
 
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Old 03-09-18, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by PJmax View Post
I usually use the top fitting where the fingers are bent over to hold it. The bottom may also work but I think it's supposed to be mounted from the inside out.
Do you secure it with zip screws at all, or do you just use the fingers to secure it?
 
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