Condensation pump discharge flooding backyard

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Old 11-20-18, 04:16 AM
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Condensation pump discharge flooding backyard

Hello All,

Just got a new Aprilaire 700. They hooked the drainage on this to my existing condensation pump. The pump is pumping a good amount of water into my backyard. There isn't any flooding, but there is over saturation and standing water.

See below photo. I'd like to divert the water from the condensation pump into my gutter drainage tube.



Can anyone provide guidance on what I should be aware in trying to do this? Gravity? Freezing? PVC parts to do this? How do I connect it to the existing gutter drainage tube?
 
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Old 11-20-18, 04:51 AM
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There is no fitting for a pipe like that to connect to a gutter. Best would be to bury a new drain pipe for the condensate drain. While at it you could make a French drain to help the water soak in better.

If you want to connect the pipe to your downspout drain you'll need to cut a hole in the black pipe and route the PVC over to it. Make sure to maintain fall in the new piping you run and I would have it enter the black corrugated pipe on top so it doesn't interfere with the rainwater using the pipe.
 
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Old 11-20-18, 04:54 AM
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Let me ask this, if I sawed off that 2" closer to the siding, put a 2" connect on it and reduced to half inch right where it enters the downspout drain, is there any risk of freezing at the transition from 2" to 1/2"?
 
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Old 11-20-18, 06:07 PM
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is there any risk of freezing at the transition from 2" to 1/2"?
You betcha. The smaller the diameter the bigger the freeze problem.

You're going to have a tough time there maintaining a good pitch as both are close to the same height. I would highly recommend making sure the humidifier is connected thru the overflow switch on the condensate pump to eliminate surprises.
 
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Old 11-21-18, 04:21 AM
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Whenever possible I would run the humidifier to an inside drain connection or to the laundry tub. If necessary I would install a dedicated condensate pump for just the humidifier. Is the condensate pipe coming out of the house used for the furnace and A/C or just the A/C, and where in the U.S. do you live. I ask this because, if you live in the northern part of the country and that line is exposed to the weather, it could freeze and no water will flow.
 
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Old 09-03-19, 02:18 PM
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Ok so I rolled the dice and did the following:

  • Sawed off the existing PVC so I could connect an immediate 90 elbow
  • Connected about 18" of straight 2" PVC
  • Connected the straight 2" to a 45 elbow
  • Connected a 2" to a 1" reducer
  • Connected about 6" of straight 1" PVC
  • Finally connected a 1" 90 that goes direct into the top of black down spout



It works like a dream when we tested it! My only concern now is how it handles in the cold weather and freezing.
 
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Old 09-04-19, 04:48 AM
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Yes, I would be concerned about the line freezing up in cold weather.
 
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Old 09-04-19, 06:17 AM
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Would insulating the PVC pipe help?

https://www.buyinsulationproductstor...ation-SSL-ASJ/
 
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Old 09-04-19, 08:43 AM
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A lot depends on how your condensate pump will be discharging water and the temperature. After running there will be a film of water in the pipe that can freeze. If the next cycle of the pump runs long enough and the water is warm enough to melt the previous water I think you'll be OK. If the pump only runs for a short time you may build up a new layer of ice with each pump cycle until the pipe is clogged.
 
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Old 09-06-19, 05:13 PM
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Hi, just curious, why is there so much condensation, what is dumping into the pump, I like the idea of that pump discharge going into an inside drain as mentioned, the pump will pump quite a distance, mine goes approximately 50 across the basement into an overhead trap, works fine.
Geo
 
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Old 09-07-19, 03:22 AM
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"Just got a new Aprilaire 700. They hooked the drainage on this to my existing condensation pump."...
 
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Old 09-07-19, 11:32 AM
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The 700 is a bypass type humidifier that has a constant water flow to a drain during operation.
It could use from 2-10 gallons in a day and discharge half of that.
 
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