Humidification: Is this crazy thinking ?

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Old 11-22-19, 04:55 PM
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Humidification: Is this crazy thinking ?

Hi have a 3200 sq/ft home with a 12000 btu forced air furnace in the basement.

I insulated the 65 foot ducts and the separate laterals .

Originally had a squirrel cage for humidity control. Not good.

Had to replace furnace with another unit due to heat exchange crapping out.

Now have Aprilaire humidifier. I have to set the humidifier to max to get humidity up.

I think that by insulating my heating ducts in my unheated basement I am lowering the operating time of the furnace but at the same time reducing the time the humidifier could be working !

Crazy as it sounds I'm thinking of pulling the insulation resulting in longer run times (more money) but more water in the air.

Am I going crazy ?

Thank You
JOB
 
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Old 11-22-19, 05:38 PM
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Insulating the ducts should not have that much effect on heating run time.
Any heat lost thru uninsulated ductwork would rise up thru the floor.

The biggest cause of low ambient humidity is infiltration of cold air from the outside.
Why do you need so much extra humidity ?
It's not necessary to reach a certain relative level.
 
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Old 11-22-19, 06:19 PM
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PJ trying to raise indoor humidity, currently home can be uncomfortable.


If heating run time will not be effected by insulating ducts then why do it ?

JOB
 
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Old 11-22-19, 06:46 PM
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I've found that insulating ducts in a basement is more helpful with A/C. Usually the basement is already cool and the added cooling from the ductwork makes the basement cold.
 
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Old 11-23-19, 03:47 AM
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"Uncomfortable". Expand on what you mean.

If you wake up in the morning with extreme dry mouth or have uncomfortable breathing while sleeping, or you find furniture is cracking or chair legs are coming loose, then yes you have a lack of humidity during winter season. But if your home is kept at a high temp and you just feel dryness in the air then you humidifier may be having trouble adding enough moisture between heating cycles. Also, do you change the humidifier media twice per heating season? You may want to add free standing humidifier to bed rooms at night. But if the windows begin to show moisture at the bottom or edges of the frame, you're over doing it.

The other alternative is to lower your typical living temperature.
 
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Old 11-23-19, 04:00 AM
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Your humidifier adds humidity only when the furnace is running,

In theory your uninsulated ducts would loose heat faster and cause the furnace to run more meaning the humidifier is working longer but that would be minimal.

What that tells me is that your humidifier is sized too small, it's not capable of putting out the sufficient amount of moisture in the time your furnace is running.

Properly size dehumidifiers can pump out gallons of water more than enough to saturate, even cause ice damns, on cold windows!

First step, get a hygrometer and measure where your at currently!
 
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Old 11-23-19, 05:46 AM
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How long have you had the new furnace?
Did you upgrade the furnace?

The reason I ask as usually when you go from an old furnace to a new high efficiency furnace the humidity in the house rises as you are not pushing interior air out the chimney.
 
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Old 11-23-19, 06:32 AM
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Your initial post said 12,000 btu's, was that supposed to be 120,000?
And what size was the old furnace?
When you factor in the improved efficiency the new furnace needed to be substantially smaller to output the same btu's and thus the same run time. In addition, the new furnace probably could have been downsized even more.

The insulation is good. if the basement needs more heat, install another register. But, I suspect there are many places where some air sealing could reduce the air leakage and that directly affects both heating costs and dry air.

Bud
 
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Old 11-25-19, 04:07 PM
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Thank you all for your responses. Been very busy unable to get to computer to reply.

Yes the current furnace is 120,000 btu .

Replaced the old furnace 120,000 btu apx 80% efficiency with new one apx 96 % efficiency.

Regarding "uncomfortable" during heating season bedroom door will no longer latch properly, this is directly related to humidity , Come end of Spring wood expands and door closes just fine.

I replace the media filter twice a season.

The humidifier is on when thermostat calls for heat, not using a humidistat.

Not looking to add register to ducts in basement, no problem with pipes freezing.

Humidifier is Aprilaire Model 600 should be large enough.

I'll compare the humidity levels in the basement and 2nd floor perhaps just an air infiltration problem.

Thanks again
JOB
 
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