Crossbow Restringing

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Old 09-27-20, 07:41 AM
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Crossbow Restringing

First off I know nothing about crossbows.
So yesterday my son and I decided to bring out his crossbow to see if he can handle it (4 years since his stoke). He shows me how to set it up and I was going to take the first shot in case anything went wrong. Well it did. The string broke as I pulled the trigger. Not surprised, it was sitting for at least 4 years since last used. Anyway son was bummed out about it.
Is this something I can restring or should I bring it to someplace like Cabella's (where he originally bought it from) or a local sporting goods store? Anything I should know like string quality or type?
 
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Old 09-27-20, 08:06 AM
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If it's an Excalibur or other recurve crossbow it's pretty simple to restring. There is a tool to help but with the right technique you can do it by just leaning into the bow. If it's a compound bow I'd take it to someone.
 
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Old 09-27-20, 08:46 AM
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Compound bow.________________________________________
 
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Old 09-27-20, 11:30 AM
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Compound bows have the string length and the cable length on the information sticker on the bow. I have always used Zebra strings and cables on my bows, they are a little pricey but are very good strings. You can look up that particular bow online to find the correct way to restring it. You don't usually need a bow press to put stings on if you carefully loosen the bolts on the limbs enough to put the strings and cables on. Don't remove the bolts entirely.
 
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Old 09-27-20, 01:50 PM
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Thanks Ron. I'll check it out.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 02:00 PM
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Finally had a chance to go to Cabella's about the string replacement. They don't stock them, due to the wide variety available. But they told me to order it directly from Barnette or 60XCustomstrings and when I get the string they will install it for free.
60XCustomstrings quoted a price of $89 for a full set including the cables or $35 for just the string. He also suggested that I replace the whole set and I agree. Didn't get a chance to call Barnett yet, but I assume pricing will be comparable.
With regard to Ron's post, I thought I would be able to just hook the loop over the clip. Completely forgot about the fact that the cross arms need to be compressed. Cabella's has the machine.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 03:20 PM
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If the string broke without firing an arrow I'd give the limbs a thorough inspection. I assume breaking a string is similarly bad to dry firing.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 03:35 PM
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similarly bad to dry firing.
Not familiar with this term. But I assume that it won't fire a bullet and may cause damage if continued to remain.

But yes, I'm going to replace all strings and cables and have the store test it out and/or calibrate (if that is the proper term).
 
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Old 09-29-20, 03:55 PM
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Dry firing is firing a weapon without a projectile. It's OK with a center fire weapon but can be harmful to a recurve or compound bow.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 04:03 PM
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can be harmful to a recurve or compound bow.
How so? Doesn't seem like any harm would occur if no arrow was in the arrow flight track. The arrows hardly have any weight to them, so that shouldn't be factor. The string would just release as you pull the trigger.
 
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Old 09-30-20, 04:57 AM
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A bow or crossbow stores a lot of energy when the limbs are pulled back. They are designed to put all that energy into the arrow or bolt. With no arrow/bolt to absorb that energy during firing it has to go somewhere and can be very destructive to the limbs and even body of the crossbow. Dry firing is one of those NEVER DO things and is a easy way to destroy a crossbow. Some crossbows even have a gizmo built in that will not allow them to fire without a bolt in place.
 
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Old 09-30-20, 04:58 AM
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OK, I understand. Thanks for the info.
 
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