Moles destroying my lawn. It's grubs right?

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Old 04-18-06, 02:27 PM
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Moles destroying my lawn. It's grubs right?

Are there any grub killers that are safe for my yard because I have a well...
 
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Old 04-18-06, 02:47 PM
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Killing the grubs often does not get the moles to go away anyway. Best bet is to trap the moles.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 03:45 PM
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Ah I see. I haven't seen them yet, but I assume that it has to be moles.

Looks like a cartoon bugs bunny was criss crossing my yard.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 04:19 PM
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Moles are carnivores and get insect larvae, especially beetle grubs. The best defense against grubs is a healthy lawn, which requires adequate water, fertilizer, and aeration. Contact your local Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent about chemical controls in your area that would have the least impact on your environment and well water and grub repellent grass varieties. Shallow dug wells are more susceptible to pollution than deep bedrock wells. Unless soil is rich in organic material grub pesticides tend to have little effect as pesticide leaches out quickly. Milky spore is a natural biological control for grubs, but it takes two to three years for it to colonize.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 05:01 PM
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Spraying to kill grubs would most probably have a detrimental affect on all other insects found in the soil. Do you really want to kill or harm everything?
I have had a terrible mole problem. Traps are the way to go. Everything I have found on the net from reputable sources (ag extension services etc) say traps are the only way to go.
 
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Old 05-31-06, 11:30 AM
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Grub predators

Try using Beneficial Nematodes, they control over 200 different insects in the soil.They are harmless to earthworms, and leave plants alone. Not to be confused with pest nematodes, beneficial nematodes are parasitic, and invade the bodies of their prey, leaving behind the dead insect carcasses. They are a very efficient organic insect control method and kill most insects before they become adults. This includes lots of common lawn and garden pests such as grubs, fleas, mole crickets, japanese beetles and weevils.

No chemicals required and they are easy to apply, check with your local garden shop - may have to be ordered in
 
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Old 06-12-06, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by slackeyed
Ah I see. I haven't seen them yet, but I assume that it has to be moles.

Looks like a cartoon bugs bunny was criss crossing my yard.

I have the same problem...but was lucky enough to see one in action. The mole hill was pulsating, so I took out my frustrations by jabbing it with my shovel. Felt good. And left the remains in the hole for his family & friends to see.
 
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Old 07-07-06, 08:46 PM
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I understand how you feel. Last year the moles were so bad in my yard I had convinced myself they got together and said Let's tear up Bills yard this year. I believed that without a doubt. My backyard looked like a construction zone. I finally calmed down after spending numerous trips to the local hardware and buying everything there was about moles. After three months and a drier wallet I was convinced that the only way to rid of a mole was to take his life. I still have a few now and then but they are under control.

This is not for everyone though. The next person might say something completly different...

Just my two cents.
 
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Old 07-08-06, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Curious Homeowner
I was convinced that the only way to rid of a mole was to take his life.
I'm not a fan of killing things, I don't hunt, but I kill gophers and moles without remorse.
 
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Old 07-08-06, 10:13 AM
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Have fought a few mole attacks here in the great northwest. I tried everything including Juicy Fruit gum. I did the grub removal thing but our moles love the earthworms and did very well without the grubs. Yup I trapped the little critters to get rid of them. Since then Washington State passed a no trap law but now look the other way because nothing else works. Have heard that if you soak the poison mole pellets with the worm stuff the fishermen use to put on their gear, you will get them. If you try that let us know, might be another Juicy Fruit gum thing.
 
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Old 07-16-06, 12:03 PM
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I have a terrible mole problem in my yard. My frustrations have reached a peak
Today I used poison pellets, smoke bombs, and topped it off by spreading some grub control. Yes I do have a trap which I set as well but have never been lucky enough to catch one.

If trapping is the best way to rid them, what kind of traps are most effective? How many should I use? DO you need to collapse the runway in order to set them? The single trap I have seems inadequate.
 
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Old 08-10-06, 08:00 AM
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I would also like to hear the answers to Jst's questions. I have tried the Victor harpoon mole trap without any success. In fact, after two weeks of setting them out, I have never even seen one of them that was tripped.

It seems to me like there are a lot of proponents of traps/trapping, but they never say what kind of trap to use & how they set it for best results.

Those with trapping experience please, how about stepping forward & telling us beginners how you get your succesfull results?
 
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Old 08-10-06, 12:18 PM
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Hi Rckowal,

Where you place the traps makes a difference. Don't use the largest piles as a place to set the traps as those are junctions of tunnels. I've heard that English scissor type traps work best. This site sells an instructional video, but they have free clips you can watch that should be enough info, along with the other info you can read on their site, for you to get the idea of how to use the scissor type traps. Scroll down for the free video clips.
http://www.molepro.com/products/inst...esidential.htm

They also have info so you can make sure it's moles and not voles or gophers that you're dealing with.

Newt
 
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Old 08-10-06, 03:14 PM
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Feeding versus traveling tunnel how do you identify one and which one is best for setting the trap.i just purchased one of them harpoon type traps and have'nt had any luck so far.My main problem is theres not that many tunnel ridges on the ground to identify just a bunch of piles of pushed up dirt.
 
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Old 08-10-06, 07:09 PM
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Hi Newt,

Thanks for the reply, it's appreciated. I took a look at the link you suggested, it helped a bit to clarify some other questuons that I had.

I've also read & heard that scissors type traps work best. In fact, I just ordered one called the "Easy Set" today from http://www.nwtrappers.com/catalog/traps/gophermole.asp. It's kind of clever the way you set it - just a push of the foot does it.

When I ordered it, I asked the proprietor what was his best selling trap (they carry all of them). He said it was the Easy Set". He also said the only problem he's seen with them is that they can't make them fast enough to meet the demand.


Originally Posted by Newt
Hi Rckowal,

Where you place the traps makes a difference. Don't use the largest piles as a place to set the traps as those are junctions of tunnels. I've heard that English scissor type traps work best. This site sells an instructional video, but they have free clips you can watch that should be enough info, along with the other info you can read on their site, for you to get the idea of how to use the scissor type traps. Scroll down for the free video clips.
http://www.molepro.com/products/inst...esidential.htm

They also have info so you can make sure it's moles and not voles or gophers that you're dealing with.

Newt
 

Last edited by rckowal; 08-10-06 at 07:35 PM.
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Old 08-10-06, 11:10 PM
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Romod,

Feeding versus traveling tunnel how do you identify one and which one is best for setting the trap.i just purchased one of them harpoon type traps and have'nt had any luck so far.My main problem is theres not that many tunnel ridges on the ground to identify just a bunch of piles of pushed up dirt.
It doesn't matter if it's a feeding or traveling tunnel as long as it's not a junction where they meet. The larger pile of earth on top of the soil is the junction. If they're all the same size then choose a small one to set your trap. These critters are tidy and will start to clear away the sand you add. You'll need to visit that site I recommended to see what I'm referring to.


Rckowal,
You are very welcome! I hope that does it for you. I've bookmarked that site too.

Newt
 
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Old 08-11-06, 08:12 AM
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Hi Newt, I'm still doing my mole home work so (naturally) I have a few new questions.

When looking at pictures of mole hills and carefully noting how folks describe them, I often see & read about "fresh soil" above the turf. My hills are about 6 to 10" in diameter, they are usually covered with brown (dead) grass and connected by ridges (tunnels). However, there is no soil visible on top of these hills.

Does this mean any thing or is this just a matter of turf/soil conditions? This area of the lawn is sandy loam. It is also watered regularly (sprinklers) so it stays fairly soft & moist.

Best regards
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-14-06 at 01:03 PM. Reason: Removed quote as it's unnecessary
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Old 08-11-06, 09:09 AM
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Hi Romod, Maybe I can add on to what Newt said by sharing some of the things I've learned so far.

As I understand it, traveling tunnels are most likely the older ones. Some times they run along side of man made barriers; like concrete slabs, pools, patio stones, etc.

Feeding tunnels are usually the newest/freshest ones within the area of greatest mole activity. The mole has to keep making new tunnels to find its food. A single mole usually operates within a fairly small area - maybe a small backyard or lawn sized area. They don't travel cross country.

To check wether a tunnel is still active or not, press down a bit of it with the width of your shoe. Mark that location with some thing (so you don't lose track of where it is) then check it frequently. If you see that your depressed spot has been pushed back up, then you've found an active tunnel.

On the other hand, if a tunnel has been there for some time, (maybe showing dead grass) then it's probably not an active feeding tunnel. In turf covered areas, fresh tunnels are usually covered with green grass (until it dies off & turns brown).

Because of the way traps work, a mole can trip them in either type of tunnel. But your chances of catching one are probably a lot better when the trap is in a fresh, active feeding tunnel.

Hope this is some help.

Originally Posted by romod
Feeding versus traveling tunnel how do you identify one and which one is best for setting the trap.i just purchased one of them harpoon type traps and have'nt had any luck so far.My main problem is theres not that many tunnel ridges on the ground to identify just a bunch of piles of pushed up dirt.
 
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Old 08-11-06, 09:21 AM
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Romod,

I think Rckowal answered that one, and much better then I could have.

Btw, are you certain you have moles and not voles?

Newt
 
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Old 08-11-06, 09:41 AM
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Newt, Please clarify how to tell.

As I understand it, voles leave a number of small, but visible holes in open (no turf) or mulched soil - similar to mice or toads.

Moles on the other hand never leave a visible open hole - they leave the hills or mounds connected with tunnels.

From what I've read, voles often times work in the tunnels left by moles - but they also work alone. Since they eat the roots off of plants; the signs of the damage they leave behind is not the same as moles.

Do I understand this difference correctly? By the way, I just found this web site which may help others to better understand voles. http://www.volecontrol.com/voles.html
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-12-06 at 08:31 PM. Reason: Removed unnecessary quote
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Old 08-11-06, 01:12 PM
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Rckowal,

One of the big differences is that moles feed on insects and earthworms and rarely eat plant material, while voles do eat plants. Voles will often have surface runways while moles have raised ridges over their tunnels.

I have a site that shows the difference between the tracks they leave but I can't get it to open. I'm sure this is it, so here it is in case it starts working.
http://icwdm.org/Inspection/outdoorsstep.asp

These sites have some good info on the differences.

Voles:
http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/...licationId=100

Moles:
http://elkhorn.unl.edu/epublic/live/g1538/build/

Hope that helps.
Newt
 
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Old 08-12-06, 05:28 PM
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How Can I Locate Mole Tunnels In Tall Grass?

I definitely have a mole - I see the mounds or hills it makes. I am however, having a tough time finding the active feeding tunnels which usually run between those mounds.

The problem here is that all of this mole activity is in very dense growing Kentucky Blue Grass sodded turf which is being mowed at 2" high. In portions of this turf (where the tunnels are, of course) the grass also matts down - so the surface of the soil can not be seen with the eye.

In an effort to find the ridges of the tunnels, I have gotten down on all four & felt around for them with my hands. Regardless, I am unable to positively locate the ridges using this or any other methods recommended on forums.

I intend to try cutting the grass shorter. In the mean time however, has any one ever found a method to locate ridges under such conditions? If so, please tell me how you do it. I will be very greatful for such help.
 
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Old 08-12-06, 06:36 PM
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Rckowal,

That site is working now. Read 'Habitat' on page 2 and then read 'Trapping' on page 5. It tells you how to locate an active tunnel and how to set it all up. At least it should be helpful, as knowing where your mole is active will help.
http://wildlifedamage.unl.edu/handbo...DF/mam_d51.pdf

Good luck!
Newt
 
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Old 08-12-06, 07:25 PM
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Hi Newt, Thanks again for all of the help. It's really appreciated.

I've read & understand all of the stuff you suggested, including habitat & trapping. It appears to me that setting the trap per se will be very simple once I can locate an active tunnel. But that's where I am stuck - trying to find any kind of ridge that runs along the top of a tunnel. I can see & feel the mounds ok but can't find tunnels radiating from the mounds.

My grass is just much too dense & matted down (visualize something like a thick coat of hair on a shaggy dog) to be able to SEE the tunnel ridges. As mentioned, I've resorted to trying to feel them out with my hands. But even that has not been too productive.

Just a bit ago, I used a spade to remove a wedge section of sod & soil at one of the mounds. This opened up into a cavern (maybe called a den). Feeling all around its sides, I was able to find a tunnel hole on one side of the cavern. However, when I tried to find a ridge on top of that tunnel hole, there was none visible ( nor felt) on the surface of the soil.

Crawling around like a dog, I eventually found a different ridge that protruded about 1/2 to 3/4" above the surrounding soil. Using a piece of 3 1/2 wide x 12" long wood, I was able to set it across the top of the ridge & rock it (like a see-saw) to see that it really was on a ridge. I probed that spot with a small rod & it felt like it went into a tunnel. I marked the spot with a dab of yellow paint then flattened the tunnel ridge with my foot on top of the wood. I checked for the "see-saw" again and there was none. Tomorrow I'll check to see it's been raised (indicating an active tunnel).

In the end result - to make a long story shorter, I think I may have finally found a technique to locate tunnels in thick turf.

Repeatin my earlier question Does any one know a way to find tunnels in 2" tall matted down turf grass?
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-12-06 at 08:30 PM. Reason: Removed unnecessary quote
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Old 08-12-06, 11:40 PM
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I have that problem also of finding actual tunnels its almost like the moles are smart enough not to leave them,plenty of mounds to go around but i usually just carefully remove the dirt and probe around for some holes in the ground under the mounds,i reset my trap today under a fresh mound but don't have my hopes up for it to spring anytime soon.should you keep the trap in the same place for a long time or keep resetting it in the fresh digs?
 
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Old 08-13-06, 07:10 AM
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Thumbs up

Finding the tunnels seems to be a common problem. I was at nursery supply store yesterday & heard the same from another trap "user". As one said "If I can't see a tunnel how will I ever know where to set the trap"???

Romod, maybe I'm missing some thing but from what I read, the trap should never be placed in a mound. It must be set in a tunnel. If set in a mound the trap CAN NOT WORK.

All traps rely on a trigger that must be contacting the soil over a tunnel that has been flattened when the trap is set. When a mole arrives at that spot, it wants to re-open the narrow (flattened) spot in the tunnel. To do so, they push the soil upwards with their back. This raises the soil, putting pressure on the trigger which causies the trap to trip.

I'm thinking that timing has some thing to do with what kind of tunnels the mole makes. I've read that when the soil is frozen (winter) or the soil is real warm (middle of summer) the worms they feed on go deeper in the soil. So it follows that the mole has to make tunnels that go deeper as well. Deep tunnels don't leave ridges at the surface of the soil.

Most instructions don't say anything about how long to leave a trap in one place. I understand that if you haven't caught a mole within a day or two, then it's time to move the trap.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-14-06 at 01:05 PM. Reason: Removed quote as it's unnecessary
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Old 08-14-06, 12:28 PM
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On my box it says spring is the best time to see the tunnels,but says moles can be trapped anytime except when the ground is very dry or cold.just seen three new mounds pop up in my yard today.wonder if i could stick a running garden hose the the mound holes if it would flush them out or drown them?
 
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Old 08-14-06, 12:51 PM
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I would think you could connect the 'dots' where you see new mounds and dig down and find the new tunnels so you can set the trap.

Newt
 
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Old 08-14-06, 01:04 PM
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Hi Romod,

I have read that some people have shoved garden hoses into mole tunnels & believed they had run them off. However, some also say, that their moles came back soon after the water left their tunnels & dens.

Myself, I've never tried this. However, I would think that the water would not go too far into the tunnel system before it was being absorbed by the surrounding soil (as fast as the hose can put it in). If so, that would mean that you would only be getting in there a short way.

I have had some success in getting the mole activity to stop for a short time using the castor oil concoctions. I say SOME because I never saw anything to prove that they were gone or that the castor oil stuff did it. You can make your own by mixing castor oil & some detergent soap liquid Then cooking that untill it forms a solution. Or you can buy one made by Dr T's at http://www.repell.com/. I've ssen this stuff at Lowes & other garden supply stores. In any case, it doesn't claim to be a permanent solution.

Good luck
 
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Old 08-14-06, 01:14 PM
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I tried this a few times but never found a tunnel on the "dotted lines". It doesn't mean that it can't work, just that I haven't found a tunnel doing it.

This is what makes me think that my tunnels may be on the dotted line but much deeper than the 4 to 6" that traps are designed to work in. As mentioned earlier, I used a spade & cut out a chunk of sod covered soil down to depth of 8 - 10" and there was no tunnel to be found.

Best regards

Originally Posted by Newt
I would think you could connect the 'dots' where you see new mounds and dig down and find the new tunnels so you can set the trap.

Newt
 
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Old 08-15-06, 11:44 AM
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Today the tables turned The harpoon trap finally did its job.Yesterday i noticed a small bit of raised ground coming from a fresh mound.so i stomped a piece of it down with my foot and later in the day i noticed it raised back up,so thats where i set my trap and got up this morning and noticed the trap had finally sprung.i pulled the trap up out of the ground and dug up the dirt and there he was,a big ole fat mole.Patience is a key word when using theses things,they might not get em right away but if you keep trying eventually the mole will be yours.
 
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Old 08-15-06, 12:52 PM
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Hi Romod,

Congratulations "Great Mole Hunter", that's good news.

I received the Easy Step trap that I ordered last week, but still haven't come across an active tunnel to try it. I intend to keep trying until I do since I do believe that trapping is the best way to get them.

By the way, I contacted Victor (probably made the harpoon trap you're usiing) inquiring about ways to locate active tunnels. They told me what we already knew " That finding active tunnels can be difficult at times". Hmmm - no kidding (grin).

In any case, your success has given me new hope that I'll eventually catch that rascal.

Best regards.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-15-06 at 12:57 PM. Reason: Removed quote as it's unnecessary
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Old 08-16-06, 01:45 AM
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Thumbs up

I just hope i don't have to try to catch too many more of them,i really hate killing things but these things just drive me nuts,i wouldn't mind the tunnel ridges above the ground at all but the big piles of dirt have to go.My trap is called a "revenge mole trap" purchased at a local dept store for 12.95 i think.I really got lucky finding that active tunnel as it came out from the mound about a foot or so then went straight into the ground.Last winter was the worst i've ever seen my yard,,, it looked like a runaway bulldozer went straight through it and the neighbors didn't hardly have any damage at all go figure!Hope this winter is much different
 
  #34  
Old 08-16-06, 06:46 AM
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Hi Romod, I feel like you do about killing little critters. My wife thinks I'm a monster since she's a real strong animal lover. She feeds the birds, squirrels & a little wild bunny every day. Even spiders get a chance to live around here - she'll scoop them up & put them outdoors.

Most of my tunnels are like yours. They come out of the mound & then dive deeper about a foot away. I'm testing some of those to try to find an active one.

Regarding moles being selective about which yard to work in. I have read that lawns/yards that are well kept are more likely to be attacked. Lawns that are fertilized & well watered, as well as gardens that are mulched are prefferd. These conditions encourage the growth of earth worms which Universities say is 75% of the moles diet. Grubs are only about 20% & they are not eaten when worms are available. Additionally, moist soil is a lot softer for the mole to tunnel in.

Another thing I read said that a typical city lot will usually only support one mole. If you have a big yard then there may be more out there. Only time wil tell.

Best regards
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-16-06 at 06:59 AM. Reason: removed quote as it's unnecessary to quote the entire post that's directly above yours
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Old 08-17-06, 05:33 PM
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Moles

Grubs are not for sure as they eat many things. I have had moles in my back yard for years and just ignore them. The only way to deal with them is by trapping. The trick is placing of the traps, so if you can live with them great if not hire a pro. One other thing is earth worms are a favorite so excessive watering of the area effected to keep the grass green will worsen the problem.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 05:55 PM
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Unhappy Anyone tried sound technology to rid moles

I have a mole problem that I cant seem to get rid of. They are tearing up what little lawn I have with the "close to suface" tunnels. Grub killer didnt work like I thought it should. I applied some 2 weeks ago and now more tunnels in different section of lawn. Traps , at least for now, are not an option
Has anyone tried Sonic technology to replel moles? One device I'm looking at is good for 1/4 acre but at $35 I want to hear from people who have used this device. I'm considering one depending on feedback

We have our home for up for sale and one thing I dont need is a mole problem.
Thank You Bruce
 

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Old 09-29-06, 04:17 PM
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I was miserable with the moles for a time, I bought the nail trap and it was okay but sometimes the damage was big before I checked and then I bought a terrier as a pet and wow he can smell them through the earth and dispences of them of them quickly - no more moles
 
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Old 10-14-06, 10:50 PM
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Originally Posted by BruceY
Has anyone tried Sonic technology to replel moles? One device I'm looking at is good for 1/4 acre but at $35 I want to hear from people who have used this device.
Thank You Bruce
Prior to my wife and I buying our house three months ago, I knew we had a bad mole problem. The home was built in 1981 and sits on 1.25 acres, as most of the other houses in our subdivision are.

Being that the moles are lower on the list of priorities I have done nothing as of yet to get rid of them other than research for the near future. However, the other day while talking to the neighbor across the street, he informed me that that my neighbor to the south (one side) and the neighbor to the west (rear of property) are both using the P3 Sonic Molechasers.

Those two neighbors’ yards are mole free! The one across the street barrowed one 30-60 days ago and he said that it drove the moles from the north side of his acre to the southwest side.


http://www.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.com/original.html

Cheers, C
 

Last edited by Annette; 10-16-06 at 11:38 AM. Reason: removed link to commercial website/advertising prohibited
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